hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 893 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 752 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 742 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 656 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 367 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 330 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 330 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 268 0 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 235 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,015 total hits in 158 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
and day. --The History of the Civil War in America: by J. S. C. Abbott, i. 108. In contrast wd the Capital. John Sherman, now (1865) United States Senator from Ohio, was then an aid-de-camphey are a part of the whole militia of the United States, obeying the call of the President. This ademy in this view the buildings of the United States Naval Academy are seen. grounds. troops whereto by the civil authorities, as of the United States laws, which are being violated within its lutionary authorities. Within that period United States soldiers, while committing no offense, hadast in part, with articles stolen from the United States; and the Federal flag, while waving over td on the 19th, April, 1861. seized by the United States Marshals at the same hour, namely, three ole uprising. Who speaks of the end of the United States? This end seemed approaching but lately, ven to that of Washington: to raise up the United States will not be less glorious than to have fou[6 more...]
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
d have been of short duration. Parton's General Butler at New Orleans, page 117. There was no rebuke :in President Lincoln's recall of General Butler from Baltimore, in compliance with the wishes of General Scott. On the contrary, it had the appearance of commendation, for he immediately offered him the commission of a Major-General of Volunteers, and the command of a much more extended military district, including Eastern Virginia and the two Carolinas, with his Headquarters at Fortress Monroe. He was succeeded in command at Baltimore by General Cadwalader, of Philadelphia, and the troops were temporarily withdrawn. Afterward the Fifth New York Regiment (Zouave), Colonel Abraham Duryee, occupied Federal Hill, and thereon built the strong earthwork known as Fort Federal Hill, whose cannon commanded both the town and Fort McHenry. The 14th of May was a memorable one in the annals of Maryland, as the time when the tide of secession, which for weeks had been threatening to i
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
tead of five, I would give them all sooner than have our country rent in fragments. . . . I hope you will provide them each with a Bible, and give them their mother's love and blessing, and tell them our prayers — will accompany them, and ascend on their behalf, night and day. --The History of the Civil War in America: by J. S. C. Abbott, i. 108. In contrast with this was the letter of a Baltimore mother to her loyal son, a clergyman in Boston, who, on, the Sunday after the attack on Fort Sumter, preached a patriotic discourse to his people. The letter was as follows:-- Baltimore, April 17, 1861. my dear son:--Your remarks last Sabbath were telegraphed to Baltimore, and published in an extra. Has God sent you to preach the sword, or to preach Christ? your Mother. The son replied:-- Boston, April 22, 1861. dear Mother:--God has sent me not only to preach the sword, but to use it. When this Government tumbles, look amongst the ruins for your Star-Spangled bann
avery, could not but perish with it. Now, every thing has changed in aspect. The friends of America should take confidence, for its greatness is inseparable, thank God! from the cause of justice. Justice can not do wrong. I like to recall this maxim, when I consider the present state of America. The Uprising of a Great People: by Count Agenor de Gasparin. Translated by Mary L. Booth. These sentences were written in March, 1861, just after President Lincoln's Inaugural Address reached Europe, and when the legislative proceedings a nd public meetings in the Free-labor States were just made known there, and gave assurance that the great body of the Nation was loyal and would sustain the incoming Administration. Speaking of the departure of Mr. Lincoln for Washington, and the farewell to his friends and neighbors, mentioned on page 275, the Count exclaims: What a debut for a Government! Haven there been many inauguration s here below of such thrilling solemnity? Do uniforms and
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
their friends had robbed the Government to the amount of forty millions of dollars; put about forty thousand armed men in the field, twenty-five thousand of whom were at that period concentrating in Virginia; sent emissaries abroad, with the name of Commissioners, to seek recognition and aid from foreign powers; commissioned numerous pirates to prey upon the commerce of the United States; extinguished the lights of light-houses and beacons along the coasts of the Slave-labor States, from Hampton Roads to the Rio Grande, The light-houses and beacons seized, and lights extinguished, commencing with that on Cape Henry, in Virginia, and ending with Point Isabel, in Texas, numbered one hundred and thirty-one. Of these, thirteen were in Virginia, twenty-seven in North Carolina, fourteen in South Carolina, thirteen in Georgia, eighteen in Florida, eight in Alabama, twenty-four in Louisiana, and fourteen in Texas. and enlisted actively in their revolutionary schemes the Governors of thirt
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ans's steam gun, 440. exasperation against Baltimore, 441. plans of Scott and Butler against Balin Maryland, 443. loyal troops pass through Baltimore, 445. Butler's descent on Baltimore, 446. Baltimore and Ohio Railway, nine miles from Baltimore, and hold it, so as to cut the secessionistsof May, an immense Union meeting was held in Baltimore, whereat the creation of the Board of Publicsand men, namely, seize and hold the city of Baltimore. Accordingly, on Saturday afternoon, the 4tted at the Relay House, within nine miles of Baltimore, seized the railway station there, spread oved at the Relay House by many Unionists from Baltimore, who gave him all desired information; and h offered aid to the corporate authorities of Baltimore, in the due administration of law; forbade t imprisoned in Fort McHenry. Judge Giles, of Baltimore, issued a writ of habeas corpus for his relethe space of six months after the tragedy in Baltimore, no less than one hundred prisoners of state[50 more...]
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
olis Junction, 439. the New York Seventh in Washington Winans's steam gun, 440. exasperation aga Annapolis, and thence across Maryland to Washington City. Butler was ordered to take that route, ttery to Annapolis to assist in the march on Washington. General Butler in New Orleans, &c.: by J Philadelphia with the intention of going to Washington by way of the Potomac. They embarked at fous Junction, and other places on the route to Washington, now came to the ears of General Butler and nts ceased, the Seventh New York going on to Washington, and the Eighth Massachusetts remaining to hss, a Committee of that Legislature, were in Washington, remonstrating with the President and Secret passed through the city on their way toward Washington without molestation. The wharves were crowdemed to indicate such complicity was sent to Washington, and the Government was furnished with such e founded them. At the middle of May, Washington City was safe, for thousands of well-armed loy[14 more...]
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
upon the commerce of the United States; extinguished the lights of light-houses and beacons along the coasts of the Slave-labor States, from Hampton Roads to the Rio Grande, The light-houses and beacons seized, and lights extinguished, commencing with that on Cape Henry, in Virginia, and ending with Point Isabel, in Texas, numbered one hundred and thirty-one. Of these, thirteen were in Virginia, twenty-seven in North Carolina, fourteen in South Carolina, thirteen in Georgia, eighteen in Florida, eight in Alabama, twenty-four in Louisiana, and fourteen in Texas. and enlisted actively in their revolutionary schemes the Governors of thirteen States, and large numbers of leading politicians in other States. Insurrection had become rebellion; and the loyal people of the country, and the National Government, beginning to comprehend the magnitude and potency of the movement, accepted it as such, and addressed themselves earnestly to the task of its suppression. Tail-piece — Light ext
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
on the march toward the Capital. John Sherman, now (1865) United States Senator from Ohio, was then an aid-de-camp of General Patterson. He was sent by that officer to lay before General Scott the advantages of the Annapolis route, suggested by General Patterson. The route was approved of by the Lieutenant-General. See A Narrative of the Campaign in the Valley of the Shenandoah: by Robert Patterson, late Major-General of Volunteers. The Massachusetts regiment had been joined at Springfield by a company under Captain H. S. Briggs, and now numbered a little over seven hundred men. It reached Philadelphia several hours before the New York Seventh arrived there, and was bountifully entertained at the Girard House by the generous citizens. There Butler first heard of the attack on the Sixth, in Baltimore. His orders commanded him to march through that city. It was now impossible to do so with less than ten thousand armed men. He counseled with Major-General Robert Patterson,
Chesapeake Bay (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
The troops were soon embarked, and at six o'clock in the evening the huge vessel — with a captain who seemed to need watching by the vigilant and loyal eyes of the soldiers, lest he should run them into Baltimore or aground — went out toward Chesapeake Bay. Making good time, she was off the old capital of Maryland at a little past midnight, when, to Butler's surprise, Annapolis and the Naval Academy were lighted up, and the people were all astir. The town and the Academy were in possession of Baltimore. These troops left Philadelphia on the 8th of May, and on the following morning, accompanied by a portion of the Third Infantry Regiment of regulars from Texas, embarked on the steamers Fanny Cadwalader and Maryland, and went down Chesapeake Bay. The whole force under Colonel Patterson was about twelve hundred. They debarked at Locust Point, near Fort McHenry, under cover of the guns of the Harriet Lane and a small gunboat, at about four o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, in
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...