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Barnwell Court House (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
or His blessing and favor on this great act of His people about to be consummated. The whole assembly at once rose to its feet, and, with hats off, listened to the touching and eloquent appeal to the All-wise Disposer of events. At the conclusion of the ceremonies, when the signatures had all been affixed by the members, whose names were called in the order of their districts, The signatures were written in five columns, and in the following order:-- D. F. Jamison, Delegate from Barnwell, and President of the Convention. Thomas Chiles Perrin.R. G. M. Dunovant.A. W. Bethen.John M. Shingler.B. H. Rutledge. Edward Noble.James Parsons Carroll.E. W. Goodwin.Daniel Du Pre.Edward McCrady. J. H. Wilson.William Gregg.William D. Johnson.A. Mazyck.Francis I. Porcher. Thos. Thomson.Andrew J. Hammond.Alex. McLeod.William Cain.T. L. Gourdin. David Lewis Wardlaw.James Tompkins.John P. Kinard.P. G. Snowden.John S. Palmer. John Alfred Calhoun.James C. Smyly.Robert Moorman.George W.
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C Daniel E. Sickles, of New York; Thomas C. Hindman, of Arkansas; Clement L. Vallandigham, of Ohio; and John W. Noell, of Missouri. Mr. Cochrane, who was afterward a general in the National Army, fighting the Slave interest in rebellion, and also ah Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for dividing the States, and the accompanying propositions concernintween Free and Slave-labor States forever, the parallel of 36° 30‘ north latitude, running from the southern boundary of Missouri to the Pacific Ocean, and known as the Missouri Compromise line. North of that line there should be no Slavery; south o
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rous things, except when the necessities of the country absolutely demand them. He opposed them, he said, simply and entirely with the view of hastening the dissolution of the Union. For the same reason, Lawrence M. Keitt favored a convention. I think, he said, it will bring about a more speedy dissolution of the Union. At this time the Union men of the State took measures for counteracting the madness of the disunionists. They celebrated the 4th of July by a mass meeting at Greenville, South Carolina. Many distinguished citizens were invited to attend, or to give their views at length on the great topic of the Union. Among these was Francis Lieber, Ll.D., Professor of History and Political Economy in the South Carolina College at Columbia. He sent an address to his fellow-citizens of the State, which was a powerful plea for the Union and against secession. He warned them that secession would lead to war. No country, he said, has ever broken up or can ever break up in peace,
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; S. R. Curtis, of Iowa; John C. Burch, of California; William Winslow, of Minnesota; and Lansing Stout, of Oregon. The Speaker, in framing this Committee, chose conservative men of the Free-labor States. Those holding extreme anti-slavery viewew Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Missis. Collamer, of Vermont; William Bigler, of Pennsylvania; R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; Robert Toombs, of Georgia; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; H. M. Rice, of Minnesota; Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois; Benjamin Wade, of Ohio; J. R. Doolittle, of Wisconsin. and J. W. Grimes, of Iowa., The Committee; was composed of eight Democr
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
th Carolina. On the red field were a silver Palmetto and Crescent. The Crescent was placed in the South Carolina flag in 1775, under the following circumstances:--The Provincial Council had taken measures to fortify Charleston, after the Royal Governor was driven away. As there was no national flag at the time, says General Moultrie, in his Memoirs, I was desired by the Council of Safety to have one made, upon which, as the State troops were clothed in blue, and the fort [Johnson, on James Island] was garrisoned by the First and Second Regiments, who wore a silver crescent on the front of their eaps, I had a large blue flag made, with a crescent in the dexter corner, to be in uniform with the troops. This was the first American flag displayed in the South. See Lossing's Pictorial Field-book of the Revolution, II. 545. The introduction of the Crescent or New Moon on the standard was considered even by thinking South Carolinians, as singularly appropriate, for those who there inau
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4
hat the enemy might not see it as a beacon. It was a mistake, for it was then more prominent than ever against a light gray sky. When the British finally took possession of the city, in the spring of 1780, the bells of St. Michael's were sent to London as spoils of victory. The merchants of that city purchased them, and returned them to the church, where they chimed and chimed, until the conspirators now believed they had sounded the death-knell of the Union, which its vestry, in 1776, zealousppertain South Carolina medal. to a free and independent State. He declared the proclamation to be given under his hand, on the 24th of December, 1860, and in the eighty-fifth year of the sovereignty and independence of South Carolina. The London Morning Star, commenting on this declaration of the Sovereignty of South Carolina, said:--A nationality I Was there ever, since the world began, a nation constituted of such materials — a commonwealth founded on such bases? The greatest empire o
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ma; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; S. R. Curtis, of Iowa; John C. Burch, of California; William Winslow, of Minnesota; and Lansing Stout, of Oregon. The Speaker, in fas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for dividing the States, and the accompanying propositions concernAlabama, A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia, James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw; to Virginia, John S. Preston. to ask their co-operation; to propose the National Constitution just abandoned as a basis for a provisional governmen
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
lace; and it was boastfully declared that the old ensign — the detested rag of the Union --should never again float in the free air of South Carolina. Already Robert Barnwell Rhett, appropriately called the Father of South Carolina secession, had sounded the tocsin. He was an arrogant demagogue, whose family name was Smith, and whose lineal root was to be found in obscurity, among the sand-hills near the mouth of the Cape Fear River, in North Carolina. He made his residence at Beaufort, South Carolina, when he dropped the name of Smith and took that of Rhett — a name honorable in the early history of that State. Note to article on Beaufort District, by Frederic Kidder, in the Continental Monthly, 1862. He succeeded in taking position among respectable men in South Carolina. With vulgar instinct Robert Barnwell Rhett. he spurned the common people, boasted of superior blood, and by the force of social influence, and much natural talent for oratory and intrigue, with the aid
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
m. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; S. R. Curtis, of Iowa; John C. Burch, of California; William Winslow, of Minnesota; and Lansing Stout, of Oregon. The Speaker, in framing this Committee, chbe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Mi
Saint Michael (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
nd going in irregular procession through Broad Street, to dinner, they were cheered by the populace, and the chimes of St. Michael's Protestant Episcopal Church St. Michael's is one of the oldest, if not the oldest Church in Charleston, and the bSt. Michael's is one of the oldest, if not the oldest Church in Charleston, and the bells, chimed for the unholy purpose mentioned in the text have interesting historical associations. When an attack on Charleston was expected, in 1776, the church spire, which was white, and was visible from some distance at sea, was painted black,er against a light gray sky. When the British finally took possession of the city, in the spring of 1780, the bells of St. Michael's were sent to London as spoils of victory. The merchants of that city purchased them, and returned them to the churc now believed they had sounded the death-knell of the Union, which its vestry, in 1776, zealously assisted to create. St. Michael's spire was the target for General Gillmore's great cannon, called The Swamp angel, during his long siege of Charlesto
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