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North America (search for this): chapter 4
rick E. Carn. another to draft a declaration of the causes that impelled and justified the secession of South Carolina ; This committee was composed of C. G. Memminger, F. H. Wardlaw, R. W. Barnwell, J. P. Richardson B. H. Rutledge, J. E. Jenkins, and P. E. Duncan. and five others, consisting of thirteen persons each, and entitled, respectively, Committee on the Message of the President of the United States, relating to property ; Committee on Relations with the Slaveholding States of North America; Committee on foreign relations; Committee on Commercial Relations and Postal Arrangements ; and Committee on the Constitution of this State. Judge Magrath moved to refer to a committee of thirteen so much of President Buchanan's Message as related to the property of the United States within the limits of South Carolina, and instruct them to report of what such property consists, how acquired, and whether the purpose for which it was so acquired can be enjoyed by the United States aft
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
g over a nest of young ones in the attitude of protection, at the same time feeding them. The same device was on the Louisiana flag. It was designed to symbolize the parental care of the National Government, and it appeared out of place in the hands of men banded to destroy that government. was unfurled, speeches were made to the populace, and no other airs were played in the streets but polkas and the Marseillaise Hymn. At Wilmington, in North Carolina, one hundred guns were fired. In Portsmouth,Virginia, fifteen were fired, being the then number of the Slave-labor States; and at Norfolk, the Palmetto flag was outspread from the top of a pole a hundred feet in hight. A banner with the same device was displayed over the custom-house at Richmond. An attempt was made to fire fifteen guns in Baltimore, when the loyal people there prevented it. On the 22d, a jubilant meeting at Memphis, Tennessee, ratified the ordinance. Fifteen guns were fired, and the office of the Avalanche, then
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Political Economy in the South Carolina College at Columbia. He sent an address to his fellow-citizens of thehe old Charles G. Memminger. State House at Columbia. The lower House of the South Carolina Legislatury a great torch-light procession in the streets of Columbia. The old banner of the Union was taken down from work of wide and powerful influence, published at Columbia, said, on the 15th of December, It is well known tber, 1860. they assembled in the Baptist Church at Columbia, they were all of one mind in relation to the mainme that the small-pox was raging as an epidemic in Columbia. Men who were professedly ready to die for the caliam Porcher miles. At the evening session in Columbia, before their flight, John A. Elmore, of Alabama, preservation in the archives of South Carolina, at Columbia. A great shout of exultation went up from the mule of Secession, to be placed in the State House at Columbia, for preservation. The Legislature of South Car
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ame device was on the Louisiana flag. It was designed to symbolize the parental care of the National Government, and it appeared out of place in the hands of men banded to destroy that government. was unfurled, speeches were made to the populace, and no other airs were played in the streets but polkas and the Marseillaise Hymn. At Wilmington, in North Carolina, one hundred guns were fired. In Portsmouth,Virginia, fifteen were fired, being the then number of the Slave-labor States; and at Norfolk, the Palmetto flag was outspread from the top of a pole a hundred feet in hight. A banner with the same device was displayed over the custom-house at Richmond. An attempt was made to fire fifteen guns in Baltimore, when the loyal people there prevented it. On the 22d, a jubilant meeting at Memphis, Tennessee, ratified the ordinance. Fifteen guns were fired, and the office of the Avalanche, then an organ of the conspirators in that region, was illuminated. At the same time, the politicia
Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
e State House and the Palmetto Flag was unfurled in its place; and it was boastfully declared that the old ensign — the detested rag of the Union --should never again float in the free air of South Carolina. Already Robert Barnwell Rhett, appropriately called the Father of South Carolina secession, had sounded the tocsin. He was an arrogant demagogue, whose family name was Smith, and whose lineal root was to be found in obscurity, among the sand-hills near the mouth of the Cape Fear River, in North Carolina. He made his residence at Beaufort, South Carolina, when he dropped the name of Smith and took that of Rhett — a name honorable in the early history of that State. Note to article on Beaufort District, by Frederic Kidder, in the Continental Monthly, 1862. He succeeded in taking position among respectable men in South Carolina. With vulgar instinct Robert Barnwell Rhett. he spurned the common people, boasted of superior blood, and by the force of social influence, and mu
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d every compromise. I shall not vote. Clopton, of Alabama, considered secession as the only remedy for existiould not sanction any temporizing policy. Pugh, of Alabama, said:--As my State intends following South Carolinarolina delegation, and most of those from Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia. By this action, they viWilliam Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennesseen Columbia, before their flight, John A. Elmore, of Alabama, and Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi, were introdof the State; and so anxious was Governor Moore, of Alabama, that South Carolina should not delay a moment, forrs appointed to visit other Slave-labor States:--To Alabama, A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia, James L. Orr; to Floridery and Mobile, by order of the Governor (Moore) of Alabama, in honor of the event. In the latter city there w
Calhoun, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
e-labor State. Rising from this mass are seen two columns of perfect and symmetrical blocks of stone, connected by an arch of the same material, on each of which, fifteen in number, are seen the name and coat-of-arms of a Slave-labor State. South Carolina forms the key-stone of the arch, on which stands Powers' statue of Calhoun leaning upon the trunk of a Palmetto-tree, and displaying, to spectators, a scroll, on, which are the words, Truth, justice, and the Constitution. On one side of Calhoun is an allegorical figure of Faith, and, on the other side, of Hope. Beyond each of these is the figure of a North American Indian armed with a rifle. In the space formed by the two columns and the arch, is the device on the seal and flag of South Carolina, namely, a Palmetto-tree with a rattlesnake coiled around its trunk, and at its base a pa-k of cannon, and some emblems of the State commerce. On a scroll fluttering from the body of the tree are the words, Southern Republic. Over the w
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
. She is sick of the Union--disgusted with it, upon any terms within the range of the widest possibility. The call was responded to by the resignations of many commissions held by South Carolinians; and the conspirators, unable to comprehend a supreme love for the Union, boasted that not a son of that State would prove loyal to the old flag. One of those who abandoned the flag was Lieutenant J. R. Hamilton, of the Navy, who, on the 14th of January, 1861, issued a circular letter from Fort Moultrie to his fellow-officers in that branch of the service, calling upon them to follow his example. It was a characteristic production. After talking much of honor, he thus counseled his friends to engage in plundering the Government:--What the South most asks of you now is, to bring with you every ship and man you can, that we may use them against the oppressors of our liberties, and the enemies of our aggravated but united people. At that time, thirty-six naval officers, born in Slave-la
f the decision of the Supreme Court, in the case of Dred Scott, that the descendant of a slave could not be a citizen of the United States, See Note 1, page 34. as the settled policy of the Government toward the inhabitants of the country, of African origin. He also proposed that neither Congress nor the people of any Territory should interfere with Slavery therein, while it remained a Territory; that the Missouri Compromise, as to the limits of Slavery, should be revived; that Congress shouth Carolina, whom the people were required to venerate as an oracle of wisdom. Rhett gave the key-note. Men went out at once, as missionaries of treason, all over South Carolina, and motley crowds of men, women, and children — Caucasian and African — listened, in excited groups, at cross-roads, court-houses, and other usual gathering-places. The burden of every speech was the wrongs suffered by South Carolina, in the Union; her right and her duty to leave it; her power to defy the world i
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
; James H. Campbell, of Pennsylvania; Peter E. Love, of Georgia; Orris S. Ferry, of Connecticut; Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morsceedings of Congress, Feb. 7, 1861, reported in Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mis
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