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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
solely, that she would otherwise lose the chief source of income for seventy thousand families of the State, arising from the sale of boys and girls, men and women. According to a report before me, five thousand slaves were sent South from Richmond, Virginia, over the Petersburg Road, five thousand over the Tennessee Road, and two thousand by other channels, during the year 1860, valued at one thousand dollars each. Twelve millions of dollars have been received in cash by the State, said the report. The Virginia Legislature, which Mr. Memminger said he found extremely difficult to see through, Mr. Memminger, in an autograph letter before me, written to R. B. Rhett, Jr., editor of The Charleston Mercury, and dated Richmond, Va., January 28, 1860, revealed some of the difficulties in the way of the success of his treasonable mission. He says:-- It is extremely difficult to see through the Virginia Legislature. The Democratic party is not a unit, and the Whigs hope to clea
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
a; Charles Francis Adams, of Massachusetts; W. Winslow, of North Carolina; James Humphreys, of New York; Wm. W. Boyce, of South Carolina; James H. Campbell, of Pennsylvania; Peter E. Love, of Georgia; Orris S. Ferry, of Connecticut; Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tllowing grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virgin. This Committee consisted of L. W. Powell and John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky; William H. Seward, of New York; J. Collamer, of Vermont; William Bigler, of Pennsylvania; R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; Robert Toombs, of Georgia; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; H. M. Rice, of Minnesota; Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois; Benjamin
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
etts; W. Winslow, of North Carolina; James Humphreys, of New York; Wm. W. Boyce, of South Carolina; James H. Campbell, of Pennsylvania; Peter E. Love, of Georgia; Orris S. Ferry, of Connecticut; Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reu, The Pacific, and The South. Proceedings of Congress, Feb. 7, 1861, reported in Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Caro
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n all acts of the Congress concerning Slavery; to make these, and all other provisions of the Constitution relating to Slavery, unamendable; and to grant to the several States authority to appoint all National officers within their respective limits. Proceedings of Congress, December 12, 1860, reported in the Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham, who was afterward convicted of, and punished for, alleged treasonable acts, See Report of his Trial, published by Rickey & Carroll: Cincinnati, Ohio, 1863. submitted a proposition for a change in the National Constitution, providing for a division of the Republic into four sections, to be called, respectively, The North, The West, The Pacific, and The South. Proceedings of Congress, Feb. 7, 1861, reported in Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania
Pacific Ocean (search for this): chapter 4
e. venerable John J. Crittenden offered to the Senate a series of amendments of the Constitution, and Joint Resolutions, for the protection of Slavery and the interests of the slaveholders, which, embodied, are known in history as the, Crittenden Compromise. The amendments proposed were substantially as; follows:-- I. To re-establish, as a boundary between Free and Slave-labor States forever, the parallel of 36° 30‘ north latitude, running from the southern boundary of Missouri to the Pacific Ocean, and known as the Missouri Compromise line. North of that line there should be no Slavery; south of it, the system might flourish, and all interference with it by the Congress should be forbidden. Not only this, but the Congress, by law, should protect this) property of the slave-owners from interference by all the departments of the Territorial government, during its continuance as such. That such Territory should, when legally qualified, be admitted into the Union as a State, with o
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
dings of the Convention, 102. rejoicings in Charleston, 104. signing of the Ordinance, 106. Commijoicings because of the revolutionary Act at Charleston, 113. Impressions in the Free-labor States,p before a large congregation of citizens in Charleston, November 30, 1860. and, in a speech which owed by speeches (some from Northern men, in Charleston on business), in which the people were addreproposed an immediate flight, by railway, to Charleston. William Porcher Miles, just from his abandhivalry of South Carolina did scamper off to Charleston the next morning, December 18, 1860. where opedia, 1861, page 649. On assembling at Charleston, the Convention proceeded at once to busines historical associations. When an attack on Charleston was expected, in 1776, the church spire, whird, of Charleston, who, after the attack on Fort Sumter, in April, 1861, sent it to Dr. Fogg, by thIt is related of the late Judge Pettigru, of Charleston, who resisted the madness of the secessionis[22 more...]
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
he expected Confederacy? This significant question was answered in, the affirmative, ten years later, by the madmen at Montgomery, who formed such Confederacy and new constitution ; and before the rebellion that ensued was crushed, the Confederacy wof dollars. When, as we shall hereafter observe, Virginia hesitated to join the Southern Confederacy, formed at Montgomery, Alabama, in February, 1861, the threat was held out that there should be a clause in the Constitution of the Confederacy pas a basis for a provisional government; and to invite the seceding States to meet South Carolina in convention at Montgomery, Alabama, on the 13th of February, 1861, for the purpose of forming a Southern Confederacy. They also made provision Decet action was greeted with delight by disunionists in most of the Slave-labor States. A hundred guns were fired both at Montgomery and Mobile, by order of the Governor (Moore) of Alabama, in honor of the event. In the latter city there was also a mi
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
on foreign relations; Committee on Commercial Relations and Postal Arrangements ; and Committee on the Constitution of this State. Judge Magrath moved to refer to a committee of thirteen so much of President Buchanan's Message as related to the property of the United States within the limits of South Carolina, and instruct them to report of what such property consists, how acquired, and whether the purpose for which it was so acquired can be enjoyed by the United States after the State of South Carolina shall have seceded, consistently with the dignity and safety of the State; also, the value of the property of the United States not in South Carolina, and the value of the share thereof to which South Carolina would be entitled upon an equitable division thereof among the United States. The President, he said, had affirmed it to be his high duty to protect the national property in South Carolina, and to enforce the laws of the nation within its borders. He says he has no constitut
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
tious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. Conduct of Souts Humphreys, of New York; Wm. W. Boyce, of South Carolina; James H. Campbell, of Pennsylvania; Peter and become spectators of the movements in South Carolina, preparatory to the open revolt that occurwas the language of a leading statesman of South Carolina, whom the people were required to venerateecember 13, 1860. said: In ten days more, South Carolina will have certainly seceded; and in reasonates, when he left Washington, was to take South Carolina out of the Union instantly. Now, Sir, he f the property of the United States not in South Carolina, and the value of the share thereof to whions, then Representatives in Congress from South Carolina:--John McQueen, William Porcher Miles, M. , for the purpose of signing the Seal of South Carolina. ordinance, which, in the mean time, had plainly to the fifteen Slave-labor States, South Carolina is to be the head and heart of the new Con[100 more...]
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
me. Memminger's manifesto, which was concluded with a ludicrous appropriation of the closing words of the great Declaration of Independence by the Fathers, in 1776, viewed in the light of truth and soberness, appears in itself a solemn protest against the wicked actions of the conspirators at that time, and ever afterward. It also presents a fair specimen of that counterfeit statesmanship which for years was palmed off on the confiding people of the Slave-labor States as genuine. The Augusta (Georgia) Chronicle and Sentinel, a leading newspaper in the South, said, twelve days after the Ordinance of Secession was passed in the South Carolina Convention:--It is a sad thing to observe, that those who are determined on immediate secession have not the coolness, the capacity, or the nerve, to propose something after that. . . . No statesmanship has ever been exhibited yet, so far as we know, by those who will dissolve the Union. --January 1, 1861. On the same day when the Declar
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