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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
mination to thwart all legislation in the direction of compromise or conciliation. And when Mr. Morris, a Democrat from Illinois, offered a resolution, December 4, 1860. that the House of Representatives were unalterably and immovably attached to t of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A.re, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Vif Virginia; Robert Toombs, of Georgia; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; H. M. Rice, of Minnesota; Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois; Benjamin Wade, of Ohio; J. R. Doolittle, of Wisconsin. and J. W. Grimes, of Iowa., The Committee; was composed of eigh
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Committee of Thirty-three was made by the Speaker, The Committee consisted of the following persons:--Thomas Corwin, of Ohio; John S. Millson, of Virginia; Charles Francis Adams, of Massachusetts; W. Winslow, of North Carolina; James Humphreys, ofresentatives John Cochrane and Daniel E. Sickles, of New York; Thomas C. Hindman, of Arkansas; Clement L. Vallandigham, of Ohio; and John W. Noell, of Missouri. Mr. Cochrane, who was afterward a general in the National Army, fighting the Slave intMaine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Dela of Georgia; Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi; H. M. Rice, of Minnesota; Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois; Benjamin Wade, of Ohio; J. R. Doolittle, of Wisconsin. and J. W. Grimes, of Iowa., The Committee; was composed of eight Democrats and five Repub
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
land; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; ReubeVirginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for dividing the States, and the accompanying propositnd a disposition to compromise much for the sake of fraternal good — will and peace. On motion of Lazarus W. Powell, of Kentucky, a Committee of Thirteen was appointed by Vice-President Breckinridge, to consider the. condition of the country, and re Constitution or otherwise, for its pacification. This Committee consisted of L. W. Powell and John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky; William H. Seward, of New York; J. Collamer, of Vermont; William Bigler, of Pennsylvania; R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia;
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d the Marseillaise Hymn. At Wilmington, in North Carolina, one hundred guns were fired. In Portsmouth,Virginia, fifteen were fired, being the then number of the Slave-labor States; and at Norfolk, the Palmetto flag was outspread from the top of a pole a hundred feet in hight. A banner with the same device was displayed over the custom-house at Richmond. An attempt was made to fire fifteen guns in Baltimore, when the loyal people there prevented it. On the 22d, a jubilant meeting at Memphis, Tennessee, ratified the ordinance. Fifteen guns were fired, and the office of the Avalanche, then an organ of the conspirators in that region, was illuminated. At the same time, the politicians of several of the Slave-labor States, as we shall observe presently, were rapidly placing the people in the position of active co-operation with those of South Carolina. Those who did not choose to follow the lead of South Carolina were treated with amazing insolence by the usurpers in that State, and
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ssion would be accepted. The appointment of the Select Committee of Thirty-three was made by the Speaker, The Committee consisted of the following persons:--Thomas Corwin, of Ohio; John S. Millson, of Virginia; Charles Francis Adams, of Massachusetts; W. Winslow, of North Carolina; James Humphreys, of New York; Wm. W. Boyce, of South Carolina; James H. Campbell, of Pennsylvania; Peter E. Love, of Georgia; Orris S. Ferry, of Connecticut; Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhoorth, The West, The Pacific, and The South. Proceedings of Congress, Feb. 7, 1861, reported in Congressional Globe. Mr. Vallandigham proposed the following grouping of States in the four sections:--The North, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The West, Ohio, Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carol
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
signing of the Ordinance, 106. Commissioners to Washington appointed, 109. addresses and Declaration, 109-1 had struck to the floor in the Senate Chamber at Washington with a bludgeon, with murderous intent (and who, e Convention; that Commissioners would be sent to Washington to treat on the terms of separation; that the demen from the Cotton-producing States, when he left Washington, was to take South Carolina out of the Union instantly. Now, Sir, he said, when the news reaches Washington that we have met here, that a panic arose about a ople, and that they had sources of information at Washington (the traitorous Secretary of War?) which made it onal Constitution; also, to send Commissioners to Washington to negotiate for the cession of the property of tms, and James L. Orr, Commissioners to proceed to Washington, to treat for the possession of the National proptrate of the nation, then sitting in the chair of Washington and Jackson; but their hearts were amazingly stre
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
necticut; Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard,diana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Pacific, Oregon and California. The South, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. These were all Slave-labor States. This scheme for dividing the States, and the accompanying propositions concerning the election of President and Congressmen, was admirably adapted to the uses of the conspirators,
Crescent City (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
of Southern productions of the earth, and over and around them the words, the wealth of the South--Rice, tobacco, sugar, and Cotton. On the day when the Ordinance of Secession was passed, the Convention adopted a banner for the new empire. It was composed of red and blue silk, the former being the ground of the standard, and the latter, in the form of a cross, bearing fifteen stars. The largest star was for South Carolina. On the red field were a silver Palmetto and Crescent. The Crescent was placed in the South Carolina flag in 1775, under the following circumstances:--The Provincial Council had taken measures to fortify Charleston, after the Royal Governor was driven away. As there was no national flag at the time, says General Moultrie, in his Memoirs, I was desired by the Council of Safety to have one made, upon which, as the State troops were clothed in blue, and the fort [Johnson, on James Island] was garrisoned by the First and Second Regiments, who wore a silver cre
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ts for the office of Vice-President of the United States, proposed the Hall of the House of Repreic property and territory belonging to the United States Tying within it, and upon the proportion o abolishing the office of President of the United States, and establishing, in lieu thereof, an Exete; also, the value of the property of the United States not in South Carolina, and the value of thkept violent hands off the property of the United States. The President, as we shall observe herea was competent to declare what laws of the United States should be continued, and what not. --All tit was asserted that the Government of the United States was no longer a Government of Confederatedying: Whilst constituting a portion of the United States, it has been your statesmanship which has was also decreed, that all citizens of the United States who were living within the limits of Southhe Convention. The judicial powers of the United States were vested in the State Courts; and Gover[18 more...]
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
le. They were men who hated democracy and a republican form of government — men who yearned for the pomps of royalty and the privileges of an hereditary aristocracy; and who had persuaded themselves and the common people around them that they were superior to all others on the continent, and patterns of gentility, refinement, grace, and every characteristic in the highest ideal of chivalry. More than once, said one of her orators, and an early conspirator, has the calm self-respect of old Carolina breeding been caricatured by the consequential insolence of vulgar imitation. William H. Trescot, Assistant Secretary of State under President Buchanan, in an Oration before the South Carolina Historical Society, in 1859. Mr. Trescot was a member of an association of South Carolinians, in 1850, whose avowed object was the destruction of the Republic by disunion. And this was the common tone of thought among them. They cherished regret that their fathers were so unwise as to break the po
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