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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

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ded the latter in the mud, in shallow water. The Pinola rescued her. Two hours afterward an immense fire-raft came roaring down the stream like a tornado, Attack on the forts. and, like its predecessors on similar errands, it was caught, and rendered harmless to the vessels it was intended to destroy. Day after day the bombardment was continued, and night after night the fire-rafts were sent blazing down the stream. Fort Jackson, the principal object of attack, still held out. On the first day of the assault, its citadel was set on fire by Porter's shells and destroyed, with all the clothing and commissary stores, the garrison suffering severely for several hours from the intense heat of the conflagration. On the 19th, the mortar-schooner Maria J. Carleton was sunk by a rifle-shell from Fort Jackson, and, at the same time, the levee having been broken in scores of places by exploding shells, the waters of the Mississippi had flooded the parade-ground and casemates of the fort
about four miles below it. This was favorable for the intended operations of the Nationals. On the 8th of April, a detachment of the coast-survey party made a minute examination of the river-banks under the protection of the Owasco; and, on the 18th, two divisions (fourteen vessels) of Porter's flotilla were moored under cover of the wood, on the shores just below Fort Jackson. To prevent the discovery of his movement, Porter had daubed the hulls of his vessels with Mississippi mud, and clotupports at Fort Jackson had been swept away by the flood, and only slight, obstructions appeared in its place, composed of eight hulks and some of the cypress logs chained together. The battle was begun before nine o'clock on the morning of the 18th, by a shot from Fort Jackson. As soon as Porter was ready, the Owasco opened fire, and the bombardment was commenced by the fourteen mortar-vessels, concealed by the woods, and the six in full view of the forts. Porter was in a position on the H
caught, and rendered harmless to the vessels it was intended to destroy. Day after day the bombardment was continued, and night after night the fire-rafts were sent blazing down the stream. Fort Jackson, the principal object of attack, still held out. On the first day of the assault, its citadel was set on fire by Porter's shells and destroyed, with all the clothing and commissary stores, the garrison suffering severely for several hours from the intense heat of the conflagration. On the 19th, the mortar-schooner Maria J. Carleton was sunk by a rifle-shell from Fort Jackson, and, at the same time, the levee having been broken in scores of places by exploding shells, the waters of the Mississippi had flooded the parade-ground and casemates of the fort. For six days the bombardment continued, with such slight effect that Duncan reported that he had suffered very little, notwithstanding his barbette guns had been disabled at times, and that twenty-five thousand heavy shells had been
Porter was in a position on the Harriet Lane to observe the effects of the shells, and he directed their range accordingly; and by ten o'clock the conflict was very warm. It was continued for several days with very little intermission, the gun-boats taking part by running up when the mortar-vessels needed relief, and firing heavy shells upon the forts. Perceiving little chance for reducing the forts, Farragut prepared to execute another part of his instructions by running by them. On the 20th April, 1862. he called a council of captains in the cabin of the Hartford, when that measure was decided upon. General Butler, who had arrived with his staff, had been up in a tug to take a look at the obstructions, and had reported that they must be opened before any vessels could pass, especially when under fire. So, at ten o'clock that night under cover of intense darkness, the wind blowing fiercely from the north, Commander Bell, with the Pinola and Itaska, supported by the Iroquois, K
ed at times, and that twenty-five thousand heavy shells had been hurled at him, of which one thousand had fallen within the fort. Duncan was not singular among Confederate officers in making other than the most exaggerated reports for the public. The number of shells thrown was about five thousand, and the number that entered the fort about three hundred. God is certainly protecting us, he said. We are still cheerful, and have an abiding faith in our ultimate success. At sunset on the 23d, April, 1862. Farragut was ready for his perilous forward movement. The mortar-boats, keeping their position, were to cover the advance with their fire. Six gun-boats (Harriet Lane, Westfield, Owasco, Clinton, Miami, and Jackson, the last towing the Ports-mouth) were to engage the water-battery below Fort Jackson, but not to make an attempt to pass it. Farragut, with his flag-ship Hartford, and the equally large ships Richmond and Brooklyn, that formed the first division, was to keep near
olutely necessary that they should escape as soon as possible. So Lovell prepared to abandon New Orleans. He disbanded the conscripts, and sent stores, munitions of war, and other valuable property up the country by steamboats and the railroad and while a portion of the volunteers hastened to Camp Moore, on the Jackson and New Orleans railway, seventy-eight miles distant, the regiment of colored troops refused to go. With nine vessels Farragut proceeded up the river on the morning of the 25th, and when near the English Turn he met evidences of the abandonment of New Orleans by the Confederates in the form of blazing ships, loaded with cotton, that came floating down the stream. Soon afterward, he discovered the Chalmette batteries on both sides of the Mississippi, a few miles below the city, and at once made dispositions to attack them. The river was so full that his vessels completely commanded the Confederate works. Moving in two lines, they proceeded to the business of disab
old and muddy water; but the work was soon and well accomplished, and on the night of the 27th Butler was at the Quarantine, ready to begin the meditated assault on Fort St. Philip the next day. His troops were landed a short distance above the fort, under cover of the guns of the Mississippi and Kineo. A small force was sent across the river to a position not far above Fort Jackson. In the mean time Porter had been pounding Fort Jackson terribly with the) shells from his mortars. On the 26th, he sent a flag of truce with a demand for its surrender, and saying that he had information that Commodore Farragut was in possession of New Orleans. On the following morning, Colonel Higgins, the commander of the forts, replied that he had no official information of the surrender of New Orleans, and, until such should be received by him, no proposition for a surrender of the works under his command could be entertained for a moment. On the same day, General Duncan, then in Fort Jackson, i
should hold no further intercourse with a body whose language was so offensive, and that, so soon as General Butler should arrive with his forces, he should turn over the charge of the city to him, and resume his naval duties. Let us see what General Butler had been doing for the few preceding days. A few hours after Mumford and his companions had pulled down the National flag, General Butler arrived and joined Farragut on the Hartford; and, in his report to the Secretary of War on the 29th, he foreshadowed his future act by saying: This outrage will be punished in such manner as in my judgment will caution both the perpetrators and abettors of the act, so that they shall fear the stripes if they do not reverence the stars of our banner. He hastened back to his troops, and took measures for their immediate advance up the river. His transports were brought into the Mississippi, and these, bearing two thousand armed men, appeared off the levee in front of New Orleans on the firs
izens from unruly members, but really in the interests of the Confederates, composed of British, French, and Spanish aliens, was now almost at an end, and the English members of it, who admired the frequent displays of British neutrality elsewhere, now imitated it by voting at their armory, that, as they would have no further use for their weapons and accouterments, they would send them to Beauregard's army at Corinth, as a slight token of their affection for the Confederate States. On the 30th, April, 1862. Farragut informed the city authorities that he should hold no further intercourse with a body whose language was so offensive, and that, so soon as General Butler should arrive with his forces, he should turn over the charge of the city to him, and resume his naval duties. Let us see what General Butler had been doing for the few preceding days. A few hours after Mumford and his companions had pulled down the National flag, General Butler arrived and joined Farragut on th
March 28th (search for this): chapter 14
eady at the Southwest Pass, just below, to, co-operate On that day the Confederates sent down a fire-ship --a fiat-boat filled with wood saturated with tar and turpentine — to burn the fleet. It came swiftly down the strong current, freighted with destruction; but it was quietly stopped in its career by some men in a small boat that went out from the Iroquois, who seized it With grappling irons, towed it to the shore, and there let it burn out in perfect harmlessness. So early as the 28th of March, Fleet-captain Henry H. Bell had made a reconnoissance well up toward Fort Jackson, with two gun-boats, and found a thick wood covering the shores of the Mississippi for about four miles below it. This was favorable for the intended operations of the Nationals. On the 8th of April, a detachment of the coast-survey party made a minute examination of the river-banks under the protection of the Owasco; and, on the 18th, two divisions (fourteen vessels) of Porter's flotilla were moored un
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