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Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Jones; Thirty-first Massa
Charles Boggs (search for this): chapter 14
p-of-war Portsmouth, 17; gun-boats Varuna, Captain Boggs, 12; Cayuga, Lieutenant Harrison, 5; Winon terribly its vials were poured upon her. Commander Boggs said, in his report, that immediately aft of them blew up. She was soon afterward Charles Boggs. furiously attacked by the ram Governor M, killing four and wounding nine of her crew. Boggs managed, he said, to get a three-inch shell in around nearly to the side of the Varuna, when Boggs gave her five 8-inch shells abaft her armor from his port guns. This settled her, said Boggs, and drove her ashore in flames. Finding his own vain Lee, came to the rescue of the Varuna, but Boggs waved him on after the Moore, which was then ihe cruelty of the flames. Report of Captain Charles Boggs to Commodore Farragut, April 29th, 1862. In his report, Captain Boggs warmly commended a powder-boy named Oscar Peck, only thirteen yearrragut had reached the Quarantine, he sent Captain Boggs in a small boat, through shallow bayous in[4 more...]
Watson Smith (search for this): chapter 14
nt Harrison, 5; Winona, Lieutenant Nichols, 4; Katahdin, Lieutenant Preble, 6; Itaska, Lieutenant Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny, Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea
John Griffith (search for this): chapter 14
f six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts,
George H. Harrison (search for this): chapter 14
ese consisted of forty-seven armed vessels, eight of which were large and powerful steam sloops-of-war. Farragut's fleet was composed of the steamers Hartford (the flag-ship), Captain Wainright; sloops Pensacola, Captain Morris, and Brooklyn, Captain Craven, 24 guns each; Richmond, Captain Alden, 26; Mississippi, Captain M. Smith, 12; Iroquois, Commander De Camp; and Oneida, Commander S. P. Lee, 9 each; sailing sloop-of-war Portsmouth, 17; gun-boats Varuna, Captain Boggs, 12; Cayuga, Lieutenant Harrison, 5; Winona, Lieutenant Nichols, 4; Katahdin, Lieutenant Preble, 6; Itaska, Lieutenant Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny, Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Wa
assachusetts, Colonel Jones; Thirty-first Massachusetts, Colonel Gooding, and Everett's Sixth Massachusetts battery. On the Matanzas, General Phelps, with the Ninth Connecticut, Colonel Cahill, and Holcomb's Second Vermont battery. On the Great Republic, General Williams, with the Twenty-first Indiana, Colonel McMillen; Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine, and Sixth Michigan, Colonel Cortinas. On the North America, the Thirtieth Massachusetts, Colonel Dudley, and a company each of Reed's and Durivage's cavalry. On the Will Farley, the Twelfth Connecticut, Colonel Deming. was ready at the Southwest Pass, just below, to, co-operate On that day the Confederates sent down a fire-ship --a fiat-boat filled with wood saturated with tar and turpentine — to burn the fleet. It came swiftly down the strong current, freighted with destruction; but it was quietly stopped in its career by some men in a small boat that went out from the Iroquois, who seized it With grappling irons, towed it to th
Picayune Butler (search for this): chapter 14
firmly held by the Confederates. The time for Butler to act had arrived. Half an hour after Farragpanions had pulled down the National flag, General Butler arrived and joined Farragut on the Hartforxplicitly stated. In that proclamation, General Butler called upon all who had taken up arms agaiistered, as the occasion calls for it General Butler had resolved to act with strictest justiceence, the temper of the people and that of General Butler were mutually understood; and his proclamarompt the inhabitants to erect a statue of General Butler in one of the public squares, in testimonyre made to thwart the orders and wishes of General Butler while he was feeding the starving poor by uncompromising with treason and rebellion, was Butler's administration of affairs in New Orleans, ththe most foolish acts. At about the time when Butler left New Orleans, Jefferson Davis issued a notouthern heart, in which he professed to review Butler's administration of affairs there. In connect[41 more...]
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 14
44. National troops in New Orleans, 345. General Butler and the absurd Mayor Monroe Butler's procButler's proclamation, 346. rebellion rebuked and checked, 347. martial law proclaimed concessions to the peopman order its effects, 350. a traitor hung Butler's administration, 351. effect of the capture rts from their supplies and supports, when General Butler should land his troops in the rear of Fortnd Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted ford, when that measure was decided upon. General Butler, who had arrived with his staff, had been ssigned work without regard to the forts. General Butler and his staff went on board the Saxon, andthe concussions. Combine, said Major Bell, of Butler's staff, all that you have ever heard of thundfor the capture and delivery of the said Benjamin F. Butler, dead or alive, to any proper Confederat order of our noble President, Davis, when old Butler is caught, and my daughter asks that she may b[2 more...]
Henry H. Bell (search for this): chapter 14
in perfect harmlessness. So early as the 28th of March, Fleet-captain Henry H. Bell had made a reconnoissance well up toward Fort Jackson, w of intense darkness, the wind blowing fiercely from the north, Commander Bell, with the Pinola and Itaska, supported by the Iroquois, Kennebeeep closely to the eastern bank, and. fight Fort St. Philip. To Captain Bell was assigned the duty of attacking the Confederate fleet above t a single broadside, lost her tow and drifted down the river. Captain Bell was less fortunate. The Sciota, Iroquois, and Pinola, passed thgging of the Hartford, had been watching the movements of Bailey and Bell through his night-glass with the greatest interest, while the vesselad and helpless fishes stunned by the concussions. Combine, said Major Bell, of Butler's staff, all that you have ever heard of thunder, and the Pinckney Battalion of Volunteers. On the following day, Captain Bell landed with a hundred marines, put the National flag in the plac
Pierre Soule (search for this): chapter 14
ing counsel of prudence, waited upon General Butler at the St. Charles, with Pierre Soule, formerly a representative in Congress, and some other friends. The interviernment, could be allowed in the management of the public affairs of the city. Soule and his friends persisted in regarding Louisiana as an independent sovereignty,ns. It had been read at the conference at the St. Charles just mentioned, when Soule declared that it would give great offense, and that the people, who were not coa withering rebuke from the commanding general. I did not expect to hear from Mr. Soule a threat on this occasion, he said. I have long been accustomed to hear thrents in the vicinity of New Orleans, and in the course of a few days the wish of Soule was literally complied with, for the troops were all withdrawn from the city, es felt by the former, by arrest and threatened imprisonment in Fort Jackson; by Soule, the ablest of the instigators of treason in Louisiana, as a prisoner in Fort W
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