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J. K. Duncan (search for this): chapter 14
eral command of the river defenses was intrusted to General J. K. Duncan, formerly an office-holder in New York, who was regorities at Richmond were so well assured of safety, by General Duncan, that they refused, even to entertain the possibility ys the bombardment continued, with such slight effect that Duncan reported that he had suffered very little, notwithstanding him, of which one thousand had fallen within the fort. Duncan was not singular among Confederate officers in making othed could be entertained for a moment. On the same day, General Duncan, then in Fort Jackson, issued an address to the soldiearriet Lane; and on the part of the Confederates by General J. K. Duncan, commander of the coast defenses, and Colonel Edwint, and some very spicy correspondence occurred between General Duncan and Captain Mitchell. The former, in his official rep of General Butler and those under his command; and of General Duncan and Colonel Higgins, of the Confederate forces. No rel
Jonas H. French (search for this): chapter 14
ered to leave the municipal government of New Orleans to the free exercise of all its powers so long as it should act in consonance with true allegiance to the General Government, and that offer had been answered by a threat. He saw clearly that compromise was out of the question, and that rebellion must be treated as rebellion, and traitors as traitors. He accordingly commenced a most vigorous administration of public affairs. Major Joseph W. Bell was appointed Provost-Judge and Colonel Jonas H. French Provost-Marshal. At the same time an effort was made to remove all causes for unnecessary irritation, and to conciliate the people. The General left the St. Charles Hotel, and made his military Headquarters in the house of General Twiggs, and his private residence in the fine mansion of Dr. Campbell, on the corner of St. Charles and Julia Streets, which was afterward occupied by General Banks. The Common Council having accepted a generous proposition of the General, the civil c
J. S. Hollins (search for this): chapter 14
ten thousand men, which the newspapers magnified, The Louisiana. for the purpose of alarming the Nationals and strengthening the faith of the people. The New Orleans Picayune of April 5 said, We have 32,000 infantry, and as many more quartered ia the neighborhood. In discipline and drill they are far superior to the Yankees. We have two very able and active generals, who possess our entire confidence-General Mansfield Lovell and Brigadier-General Ruggles. For Commodore, we have old Hollins — a Nelson in his way. That faith in the defenses of the city was very strong, for they believed them to be impregnable. Never doubting that impregnability, the citizens continued their occupations as usual. One of the journals boastingly said, Our only fear is, that the northern invaders may not appear. We have made such extensive preparations to receive them, that it were vexatious if their invincible armada escapes the fate we have in store for it. New Orleans Picayune, April 5,
Thomas Monroe (search for this): chapter 14
. battle with the forts and the ram Manassas, 334. fearful struggle of the Hartford, 335. a desperate naval battle, 336. capture of forts Jackson and St. Philip, 339. excitement in New Orleans, 340. flight of Lovell and his troops, 341. Farragut approaches New Orleans Destruetion of property there, 342. Farragut before the City, 343. folly of the civil authorities impertinence of a French naval Commander, 344. National troops in New Orleans, 345. General Butler and the absurd Mayor Monroe Butler's proclamation, 346. rebellion rebuked and checked, 347. martial law proclaimed concessions to the people, 348. benevolent and Sanitary measures the rebellious spirit of citizens, 349. Butler's famous woman order its effects, 350. a traitor hung Butler's administration, 351. effect of the capture of New Orleans, 352. Ship Island was the place of rendezvous for the naval as well as the land portion of the forces destined for the capture of New Orleans. The naval forc
t Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny, Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), an
Oliver H. Lee (search for this): chapter 14
A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horars he was offensive as well as defensive, and compelled three of the Confederate gun-boats to surrender to him before the Varuna, Captain Boggs, and the Oneida, Captain Lee, came to his rescue. Then the Cayuga, which had been struck forty-two times during the struggle, and much damaged in spars and rigging, moved up the river pursid not cease until the water was over the gun-trucks, when Boggs turned his attention to getting the wounded and crew out of the vessel. Just then, the Oneida, Captain Lee, came to the rescue of the Varuna, but Boggs waved him on after the Moore, which was then in flames. The latter was surrendered to the Oneida by her second off
David D. Porter (search for this): chapter 14
Plan for the capture of New Orleans Porter's mortar fleet, 328. the defenses of New Orle that a fleet of bomb-vessels, under Commander David D. Porter (with whose father Farragut had crui performance of the duties required of him. Porter's mortar fleet had been for several months in the 17th of April. The fleets of Farragut and Porter These consisted of forty-seven armed vesselh, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenon. To prevent the discovery of his movement, Porter had daubed the hulls of his vessels with Missiwoods, and the six in full view of the forts. Porter was in a position on the Harriet Lane to obserof the assault, its citadel was set on fire by Porter's shells and destroyed, with all the clothing state, was seen moving down into the midst of Porter's mortar-fleet. Some of these opened fire upohe hastened to accept the generous terms which Porter had offered. While these terms were being red[13 more...]
s to act to advantage. My greatest fear was that we should fire into each other; and Captain Wainwright and myself were hallooing ourselves hoarse at the men not to fire into our ships. We have observed that the fleet had not fairly passed the river obstructions before the Confederate rams and gun-boats appeared. There were six rams, named Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defiance, Resolute, Governor Moore, and General Quitman, commanded respectively by Captains Stephenson, Philips, McCoy, Hooper, Kennon, and Grant. These were river steamers, made shot-proof by cotton bulk-heads, and furnished with iron prows for pushing. The ram Manassas, then commanded by Captain Warley, was an entirely different affair. She was thus described by an eye-witness: She is about one hundred feet long and twenty feet beam, and draws from nine to twelve feet water. Her shape above water is nearly that of half a sharply pointed egg-shell, so that a shot will glance from.her, no matter where it s
efenses, even when the mortar-fleet had begun its work. Pollard's First Year of the War, page 810. All things were in readiness for assault on the 17th of April. The fleets of Farragut and Porter These consisted of forty-seven armed vessels, eight of which were large and powerful steam sloops-of-war. Farragut's fleet was composed of the steamers Hartford (the flag-ship), Captain Wainright; sloops Pensacola, Captain Morris, and Brooklyn, Captain Craven, 24 guns each; Richmond, Captain Alden, 26; Mississippi, Captain M. Smith, 12; Iroquois, Commander De Camp; and Oneida, Commander S. P. Lee, 9 each; sailing sloop-of-war Portsmouth, 17; gun-boats Varuna, Captain Boggs, 12; Cayuga, Lieutenant Harrison, 5; Winona, Lieutenant Nichols, 4; Katahdin, Lieutenant Preble, 6; Itaska, Lieutenant Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny,
2, and arrived in the harbor of Ship Island on the 20th of the same month, having been detained by sickness at Key West. He had been instructed by the Secretary of the Navy Jan. 20, 1862. to proceed with all possible dispatch to the Gulf of Mexico, with orders for Flag-officer McKean, on duty there, to transfer to the former the command of the Western Gulf squadron. He was informed that a fleet of bomb-vessels, under Commander David D. Porter (with whose father Farragut had cruised in the Essex during the war of 1812), would be attached to his squadron, and these were to rendezvous at Key West. He was directed to proceed up the Mississippi so soon as the mortar-vessels were ready, with such others as might be spared from the blockade, reduce the defenses which guarded the approaches to New Orleans, and, taking possession of that city under the guns of his-squadron, hoist the American flag in it, and hold possession until troops could be sent to him. If the Mississippi expedition f
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