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A. N. Smith (search for this): chapter 14
he flag-ship), Captain Wainright; sloops Pensacola, Captain Morris, and Brooklyn, Captain Craven, 24 guns each; Richmond, Captain Alden, 26; Mississippi, Captain M. Smith, 12; Iroquois, Commander De Camp; and Oneida, Commander S. P. Lee, 9 each; sailing sloop-of-war Portsmouth, 17; gun-boats Varuna, Captain Boggs, 12; Cayuga, Lieutenant Harrison, 5; Winona, Lieutenant Nichols, 4; Katahdin, Lieutenant Preble, 6; Itaska, Lieutenant Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny, Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vesse
ell. Commodore Farragut, in the mean time, was having a rough time of it, as he said. While battling with the forts, a huge fire-raft, pushed by the Manassas, came suddenly upon him, all a-blaze. In trying to avoid this, the Hartford was run aground, and the incendiary came crashing alongside of her. In a moment, said Farragut, the ship was one blaze all along the port side, half way up to the main and mizzen tops. But thanks to the good organization of the fire department, by Lieutenant Thornton, the flames were extinguished, and at the same time we backed off and got clear of the raft. All this time we were pouring shells into the forts, and they into us, and now and then a rebel steamer would get under our fire and receive our salutation of a broadside. The Hartford. Before the fleet had fairly passed the forts, the Confederate gunboats and rams appeared and took part in the battle, producing a scene at once awful and grand. The noise of twenty mortars and two hun
Charles Reed (search for this): chapter 14
the Great Republic, General Williams, with the Twenty-first Indiana, Colonel McMillen; Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine, and Sixth Michigan, Colonel Cortinas. On the North America, the Thirtieth Massachusetts, Colonel Dudley, and a company each of Reed's and Durivage's cavalry. On the Will Farley, the Twelfth Connecticut, Colonel Deming. was ready at the Southwest Pass, just below, to, co-operate On that day the Confederates sent down a fire-ship --a fiat-boat filled with wood saturated withly informed, in a private manner, that the hauling down of the flag from the Mint was the unauthorized act of the men who performed it. These were W. B. Mumford (who cut it loose from the flagstaff), Lieutenant Holmes, Sergeant Burns, and lames Reed, all but Mumford members of the Pinckney Battalion of Volunteers. On the following day, Captain Bell landed with a hundred marines, put the National flag in the places of the ensigns of rebellion on the Mint and Custom House, locked the door o
Sarah Bruin (search for this): chapter 14
under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Jones;
ur ships. We have observed that the fleet had not fairly passed the river obstructions before the Confederate rams and gun-boats appeared. There were six rams, named Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defiance, Resolute, Governor Moore, and General Quitman, commanded respectively by Captains Stephenson, Philips, McCoy, Hooper, Kennon, and Grant. These were river steamers, made shot-proof by cotton bulk-heads, and furnished with iron prows for pushing. The ram Manassas, then commanded by Captain Warley, was an entirely different affair. She was thus described by an eye-witness: She is about one hundred feet long and twenty feet beam, and draws from nine to twelve feet water. Her shape above water is nearly that of half a sharply pointed egg-shell, so that a shot will glance from.her, no matter where it strikes. Her back is formed of twelve-inch oak, covered with one-and-a-half-inch bar iron. She has two chimneys, so arranged as to slide down in time of action. The pilot hous
William Farley (search for this): chapter 14
rty-first Massachusetts, Colonel Gooding, and Everett's Sixth Massachusetts battery. On the Matanzas, General Phelps, with the Ninth Connecticut, Colonel Cahill, and Holcomb's Second Vermont battery. On the Great Republic, General Williams, with the Twenty-first Indiana, Colonel McMillen; Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine, and Sixth Michigan, Colonel Cortinas. On the North America, the Thirtieth Massachusetts, Colonel Dudley, and a company each of Reed's and Durivage's cavalry. On the Will Farley, the Twelfth Connecticut, Colonel Deming. was ready at the Southwest Pass, just below, to, co-operate On that day the Confederates sent down a fire-ship --a fiat-boat filled with wood saturated with tar and turpentine — to burn the fleet. It came swiftly down the strong current, freighted with destruction; but it was quietly stopped in its career by some men in a small boat that went out from the Iroquois, who seized it With grappling irons, towed it to the shore, and there let it burn o
Paul R. Hayne (search for this): chapter 14
with you, oh, our fathers I Rather, like Virginius, plunge your swords into our breasts, saying, This is all we can give our daughters. The Governor of Louisiana said: It was reserved for a Federal general to invite his soldiers to the perpetration of outrages, at the mention of which the blood recoils with horror. A Georgian offered a reward of $10,000 for the infamous Butler's head; and A Savannah woman suggested a contribution from every woman in the Confederacy to triple the sum. Paul R. Hayne, the South Carolina poet, was again inspired to write nonsense (see page 104, volume I.), and said:-- Yes I but there's one who shall not die In battle harness! One for whom Lurks in the darkness silently Another and a sterner doom! A warrior's end should crown the brave-- For him, swift cord I and felon grave! Lord Palmerston, the British premier, in the plenitude of his admiration for the insurgents, and remembering how savages in red coats had been wont to. conduct themselves
or three vessels to act to advantage. My greatest fear was that we should fire into each other; and Captain Wainwright and myself were hallooing ourselves hoarse at the men not to fire into our ships. We have observed that the fleet had not fairly passed the river obstructions before the Confederate rams and gun-boats appeared. There were six rams, named Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defiance, Resolute, Governor Moore, and General Quitman, commanded respectively by Captains Stephenson, Philips, McCoy, Hooper, Kennon, and Grant. These were river steamers, made shot-proof by cotton bulk-heads, and furnished with iron prows for pushing. The ram Manassas, then commanded by Captain Warley, was an entirely different affair. She was thus described by an eye-witness: She is about one hundred feet long and twenty feet beam, and draws from nine to twelve feet water. Her shape above water is nearly that of half a sharply pointed egg-shell, so that a shot will glance from.her, no m
John Williams (search for this): chapter 14
battery of heavy field-guns. These formed a procession and acted as an escort for General Butler and his staff, and General Williams and his staff; and to the tune of the Star Spangled Banner they marched through Poydras and St. Charles Streets to Che General and the city authorities had been in conference, the conduct of the populace had become so alarming, that General Williams sent word to Butler that he feared he could not control them. The General calmly replied: Give my compliments to GeGeneral Williams, and tell him, if he finds he cannot control the mob, to open upon them with artillery. The Mayor and his friends sprang to their feet in consternation. Don't do that, General, exclaimed the terrified Monroe. Why not, gentlemen? saarrolton, under General Phelps, where a permanent camp was formed. General Butler's residence. Others, under General Williams, went up the river with Commodore Farragut, to take possession of and hold Baton Rouge. Others were sent to points
Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 14
ollowing regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Jones; Thirty-first Massachusetts, Colonel Gooding, and Everett's Sixth Massachusetts battery. On the Matanzas, General Phelps, with the Ninth Connecticut, Colonel Cahill, and Holcomb's Second Vermont battery. On the Great Ry of the Thirty-first Massachusetts was the first to land. These were followed by the remainder of the regiment; also by the Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine; and Everett's battery of heavy field-guns. These formed a procession and acted as an escort for General Butler and his staff, and General Williams and his staff; and to the leans heard when the troops landed. yet the consciousness of supporting power behind the pacific order caused them to march silently on to their destination. Captain Everett posted his cannon around the Custom House, and comparative quiet prevailed in New Orleans that night. Colonel Deming's Twelfth Connecticut landed, and bivoua
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