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armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Jones; Thirty-first Massachusetts, Colonel Gooding, and Everett's Sixth Massachusetts battery. On the Matanzas, General Phelps, with the Ninth Connecticut, Colonel Cahill, and Holcomb's Second Vermont battery. On the Great Republic, General Williams, with the Twenty-first Indiana, Colonel McMillen; Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine, and Sixth Michigan, Colonel Cortinas. On the North America, the Thirtieth Massachusetts, Colonel Dudley, and a company each of Reed's and Durivage's cavalry. On the Will Farley, the Twelfth Connecticut, Colonel Deming. was ready at the Southwest Pass, just below, to, co-operate On that day the Confederates sent down a fire-ship --a fiat-b
B. Caldwell (search for this): chapter 14
-of-war. Farragut's fleet was composed of the steamers Hartford (the flag-ship), Captain Wainright; sloops Pensacola, Captain Morris, and Brooklyn, Captain Craven, 24 guns each; Richmond, Captain Alden, 26; Mississippi, Captain M. Smith, 12; Iroquois, Commander De Camp; and Oneida, Commander S. P. Lee, 9 each; sailing sloop-of-war Portsmouth, 17; gun-boats Varuna, Captain Boggs, 12; Cayuga, Lieutenant Harrison, 5; Winona, Lieutenant Nichols, 4; Katahdin, Lieutenant Preble, 6; Itaska, Lieutenant Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny, Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutena
Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousan
, opposite New Orleans. A company of the Thirty-first Massachusetts was the first to land. These were followed by the remainder of the regiment; also by the Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine; and Everett's battery of heavy field-guns. These formed a procession and acted as an escort for General Butler and his staff, and General Williams and his staff; and to the tune of the Star Spangled Banner they marched through Poydras and St. Charles Streets to Canal Street, under the guidance of Lieutenant Weigel, of Baltimore, one of Butler's aids, who was familiar with the city. They took possession of the Custom House, whose principal entrance is on Canal Street, and there the Massachusetts regiment was quartered. Strict directions had been given not to resent any insults that might be offered by the vast crowd that filled the side-walks, without orders; but if a shot should be fired from a house, to halt, arrest the inmates, and destroy the building. Every moment the crowd became great
John T. Monroe (search for this): chapter 14
cursing crowd to the City Hall, escorted by sensible citizens. To the demand for surrender, Lovell returned an unqualified refusal, but saying, that as he was powerless to hold the city against great odds, and wishing to save it from destruction, he would withdraw his troops and turn it over to the civil authorities. At the same time he advised the Mayor not to surrender the city, nor allow the flags to be taken down by any of its people. Acting upon this foolish advice, the Mayor (John T. Monroe), one of the most unworthy of the public men of the day, refused to surrender the city or take down the Louisiana flag from the City Hall. This refusal was in the form of a most ridiculous letter to Farragut, in which the Mayor declared that, while his people could not prevent the occupation of the city by the National forces, they would not transfer their allegiance to a government they had deliberately repudiated. As to the hoisting of any flag, he said, than the flag of our own ad
George Mangham (search for this): chapter 14
divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and th
Headquarters in the house of General Twiggs, and his private residence in the fine mansion of Dr. Campbell, on the corner of St. Charles and Julia Streets, which was afterward occupied by General Banks. The Common Council having accepted a generous proposition of the General, the civil city government was allowed to go on as usual. The troops were withdrawn from the vicinity of the City Hall, and camps on public squares were broken up. Quite a large number of the soldiers were sent to Carrolton, under General Phelps, where a permanent camp was formed. General Butler's residence. Others, under General Williams, went up the river with Commodore Farragut, to take possession of and hold Baton Rouge. Others were sent to points in the vicinity of New Orleans, and in the course of a few days the wish of Soule was literally complied with, for the troops were all withdrawn from the city, excepting a sufficient number retained to act as an efficient provost-guard. These concess
Henry James (search for this): chapter 14
, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea Foam, Henry James, Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Jones; Thirty-first Massachusetts, C
e most ample provisions, as they thought, for the sure defense of New Orleans. The infamous General Twiggs, See page 265, volume I. whom the Louisiana insurgents had called to their command, had bs assisted by General Ruggles, a man of considerable energy. Lovell everywhere saw evidences of Twiggs's imbecility; and, when he was informed of the gathering of National ships and soldiers in the Gnsulates were crowded with foreigners depositing Twiggs's House. this was the appearance of Twiggs's residence when the writer visited it, in the spring of 1866. it was a large brick House, at ts paymaster. their money and other valuables for safety from the impending storm; and poor old Twiggs, the traitor, like his former master, Floyd, fearing the wrath of his injured Government, fled f The General left the St. Charles Hotel, and made his military Headquarters in the house of General Twiggs, and his private residence in the fine mansion of Dr. Campbell, on the corner of St. Charles
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 14
At sunset on the 23d, April, 1862. Farragut was ready for his perilous forward movement. The mortar-boats, keeping their position, were to cover the advance with their fire. Six gun-boats (Harriet Lane, Westfield, Owasco, Clinton, Miami, and Jackson, the last towing the Ports-mouth) were to engage the water-battery below Fort Jackson, but not to make an attempt to pass it. Farragut, with his flag-ship Hartford, and the equally large ships Richmond and Brooklyn, that formed the first divisioere hallooing ourselves hoarse at the men not to fire into our ships. We have observed that the fleet had not fairly passed the river obstructions before the Confederate rams and gun-boats appeared. There were six rams, named Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defiance, Resolute, Governor Moore, and General Quitman, commanded respectively by Captains Stephenson, Philips, McCoy, Hooper, Kennon, and Grant. These were river steamers, made shot-proof by cotton bulk-heads, and furnished with iron pr
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