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Cold Harbor Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ad of the navigation of the Pamunkey, and about eighteen miles from Richmond, until the 16th. He arrived at Tunstall's Station, on the Richmond and York River railway, on the 18th, and on the 22d he made his Headquarters at Cool Arbor, Cool Arbor derived its name from a tavern, at a delightful place of summer resort in the woods for the Richmond people, even so early as the time of the Revolution. The derivation of the name determines its orthography. It has been erroneously spelled Coal Harbor and Cold Harbor. The picture on the next page is a view of the house known as New Cool Arbor, not far from the site of the old one. It was yet standing when the writer visited the spot in June, 1866. It was on a level plain, and near it was a National cemetery into which the remains of the slain Union soldiers buried in the surrounding fields were then being collected and reinterred. not far from the Chickahomminy, and between eight and nine miles from Richmond. His advanced light tro
Harrison, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
It was specially so at the center, and continued several hours, Milroy and Schenck all the while gaining ground; the former with heavy loss. The brunt of the battle fell upon him and Stahl, and upon Trimble on the part of the Confederates. Stahl's troops Union Church at Cross Keys. this little picture shows the appearance of the Church when the writer sketched it, in October, 1866. it was built of brick, and stood in a grove of oaks, a short distance from the Port Republic road from Harrison. Burg. Its interior was a ruin, and its walls showed many scars of heavy shot and shell. In front of it was a cemetery, in a substantial inclosure. Fremont used the Church for a hospital. finally gave way, and an order was given at about four o’Clock for the whole line to fall back, at the moment when Milroy had penetrated Ewell's center, and was almost up to his guns. That daring soldier obeyed, but with the greatest reluctance, for he felt sure of victory. The Confederates occupied
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, 398. battle of Port Republic and escape of Jackson's Army, 399. a visit to the Shenandoah regiondependent command in Southwestern Virginia. Jackson's entire force was now about fifteen thousanded, as nearly destroyed. In the mean time Jackson's whole force had been ordered up, The bat and quarter-master's stores were destroyed. Jackson's reported loss, including that at Front Roya fugitives after the battle at Winchester. Jackson's Report to the Confederate Secretary of War.near Port Republic almost simultaneously with Jackson's advance. On Saturday, the 7th, Carroll hadsten to that point, destroy the bridge, seize Jackson's train, and fall on his flank. With less thmiles of Port Republic. He was informed that Jackson's train was parked there,. with a large drovef capturing the June 8. coveted prize; drove Jackson's cavalry-guard out, and took possession of tisoners. So overwhelming was the number of Jackson's troops that Tyler was compelled to retreat.[5 more...]
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ational troops on the Pamunkey a sharp fight, 385. head quarters near the White House a trick to save that building, 386. preparations to attack Norfolk vigilef, with the advance portion of his force, did not reach the vicinity of the White House, The White House, as it was called, was the property of Mary Custis Lee, White House, as it was called, was the property of Mary Custis Lee, a great-granddaughter of Mrs. Washington, daughter of George W. P. Custis, the adopted son of Washington, and wife of the Confederate Commander, Robert E. Lee. It stood on or near the site of the dwelling known as The White House, in which the widow Custis lived, and where the nuptial ceremonies of her marriage with Colonel Geoy, and about eighteen miles from Richmond, until the 16th. He arrived at Tunstall's Station, on the Richmond and York River railway, on the 18th, and on the 22d he m from Richmond. His advanced light troops had reached Bottom's The modern White House. bridge, on the Chickahominy, at the crossing of the New Kent road, two d
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the Massanutten Mountain and the Blue Ridge, and hastened toward Front Royal, to cut off Banks's retreat in that direction, if he should atteell May 28, 1862. with crushing force on the little garrison of Front Royal, of about a thousand men, under Colonel Kenly. These were com was charged with the protection of the road and bridges between Front Royal and Strasburg. One company each of the Second Massachusetts, Thtant. In it was the statement, that when Ewell's force was near Front Royal, a young woman was seen running toward them. She had made a cirall Confederate force there, which was easily driven back on the Front Royal road by Knipe's Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, supported by Cochran'sores were destroyed. Jackson's reported loss, including that at Front Royal, was 68 killed and 829 wounded. He also reported that he capture space of forty-eight hours after hearing of Kenly's disaster at Front Royal, Banks, with his little army, had marched fifty-three miles, wit
Madison (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
occasion to describe this really great wonder of nature — a wonder worthy of a voyage across oceans and continents to see; This cave is seventeen miles northeast from Staunton, in the northern extremity of Augusta County. It is on the eastern side of a high hill that runs parallel with the Blue Ridge, and a little more than two miles from it. It was accidentally discovered by a hunter — a German named Barnard Weyer — about the year 1804. A short distance from it, in the same hill, is Madison's Cave, so well described by Jefferson in his Notes on Virginia, at a time when this far greater cave was unknown. so we will dismiss the consideration of it by saying that we ascended into upper air and the sunlight at a late hour in the afternoon, with appetites that gave a keen relish to a good dinner at Mohler's, for we had eaten nothing since breakfast. After dinner we rode on by a good highway, parallel with the Valley Pike, toward Staunton, passing the site of what is known as the B<
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
n Mountain and the Blue Ridge, and hastened toward Front Royal, to cut off Banks's retreat in that direction, if he should attempt to join McDowell by way of the Manassas Gap railroad. Ashby's cavalry so perfectly masked this movement that Banks was not aware of it, and almost without a warning Ewell fell May 28, 1862. with crushing force on the little garrison of Front Royal, of about a thousand men, under Colonel Kenly. These were composed of two companies each of the Twenty-seve Pennsylvania and Fifth New York cavalry, one company of Captain Mapes's Pioneers, and a section of Knapp's battery. Kenly was charged with the protection of the road and bridges between Front Royal and Strasburg. One company each of the Second Massachusetts, Third Wisconsin, and Twenty-seventh Indiana were posted along that road. When the writer was at Nashville, early in May, 1866, he was permitted by General Ewell, then residing there, to peruse and make extracts from the manuscript records of
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
was seen, when Dana landed, and the Sixteenth, Thirty-first, and Thirty-second New York, and the Ninety-fifth and Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania, were ordered to drive from the woods what was supposed to be a body of scouts lurking there in front of a few Confederate regiments. They pushed into the forest and were met by Whiting's division and other troops, forming the rear-guard of Johnston's retreating forces, when a spirited engagement began, chiefly by Hood's Texas brigade and Hampton's (South Carolina) Legion, on the part of the Confederates. The contest was continued for three or four hours, when the cannon on the gun-boats, and batteries that were speedily landed, drove the foe from their shelter in the woods, and kept them at bay. In this encounter the Nationals lost one hundred and ninety-four men, mostly of the Thirty-first and Thirty-Second New York. The loss of the Confederates was small. The National force now at the head of York was sufficient to hold it firmly, as a secur
Fishers Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
June 12. two miles from Port Republic, and on the 17th he was summoned, with a greater portion of his army, to assist in the defense of Richmond. The writer, accompanied by two friends ( S. M. Buckingham and H. L. Young), visited the theater of events recorded in this chapter early in October, 1866. Having explored places made famous by the exploits of Sheridan and others at a later period of the war, from Harper's Ferry to Winchester, and at Kernstown, Middletown, Cedar Creek, and Fisher's Hill, we left Strasburg for Harrisonburg at nine o'clock in the evening, Oct. 5, 1866. in an old-fashioned stage-coach, making three of nine passengers inside, with a remainder on the top. Our route lay along the great Valley Pike from Winchester to Staunton, a distance of fifty miles, and we were at breakfast in Harrisonburg the next morning at eight o'clock. An hour later we were on our way to the battle-fields of Cross Keys and Port Republic, in a well-worn and rusty pleasure-carriage bel
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
h fifteen thousand men; General Banks was at Strasburg, in the Valley, with about sixteen thousand; to fall upon Banks. The latter had fled to Strasburg pursued by Ewell, and Jackson pushed on,, jothe road and bridges between Front Royal and Strasburg. One company each of the Second Massachuset over the Greenbrier River. Banks was at Strasburg, about fifteen miles distant, unsuspicious oview of a possible necessity for a return to Strasburg, Banks sent Captain Abert, of the Topographiff from the column, had a severe skirmish at Strasburg, and did not rejoin the army until it was ate and the troops from McDowell might join at Strasburg in time to head off Jackson. McDowell obeyee from Franklin to Harrisonburg, and reached Strasburg on the evening of the 1st of June, a little rd of cavalry, under General Bayard, reached Strasburg, too late likewise for the intended service own, Cedar Creek, and Fisher's Hill, we left Strasburg for Harrisonburg at nine o'clock in the even[3 more...]
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