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Middletown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ek, three miles from Strasburg, word came that the train had been attacked at Middletown, two miles farther on. The news was instantly followed by a host of frightenel it was at Williamsport, on the Potomac. and Colonel Donnelly, pushing on to Middletown, encountered a small Confederate force there, which was easily driven back onhe lead, and soon reported the road clear to Winchester, thirteen miles below Middletown; but before Banks's main body had all passed the latter village, the Confeder sheltered from their foes by stone walls. General Hatch (who was cut off at Middletown), with Tompkins's cavalry, had rejoined the army just in time to participate valry, who, stopping to pillage the abandoned wagons of Banks's train between Middletown and Newton, did not come up in time to pursue the fugitives after the battle later period of the war, from Harper's Ferry to Winchester, and at Kernstown, Middletown, Cedar Creek, and Fisher's Hill, we left Strasburg for Harrisonburg at nine o
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
to cut off the enemy's communication between Winchester and Alexandria. --Autograph letter of Roberthe lead, and soon reported the road clear to Winchester, thirteen miles below Middletown; but beforens's First Vermont cavalry rejoined Banks at Winchester the next morning, and De Forest's Fifth New federate force near Newton, eight miles from Winchester, which was repulsed by the Second Massachuse, who bivouacked within a mile and a half of Winchester, began operations to that end before the daw knowledge of what was occurring in front of Winchester, for he was seven miles in the rear. So ignsupposed Ewell to be four or five miles from Winchester, when, as we have observed, he had encamped nks, suffered serious loss in the streets of Winchester. Males and females vied with each other in ad halted his infantry a short distance from Winchester, but George H. Stewart had followed the fugir route lay along the great Valley Pike from Winchester to Staunton, a distance of fifty miles, and [11 more...]
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e that building, 386. preparations to attack Norfolk vigilance of General Wool, 387. he leads tre watchful little Monitor that it remained at Norfolk. Already some war-vessels, and a fleet of trde in McClellan's rear by the Confederates at Norfolk, and by General Wool at Fortress Monroe. Woornment to allow him to attempt the capture of Norfolk, and thus make the breaking up of the blockadattempt to seize Sewell's Point, and march on Norfolk. Arrangements were made with Commodore Goldsld be taken in reverse, and a direct route to Norfolk be opened. The troops were again embarked, aWool had landed at Ocean View, he turned over Norfolk to the keeping of Mayor Lamb, and with his troops fled towards Richmond. Norfolk was formally surrendered to General Wool; and from the City Hasland, for the two-fold purpose of protecting Norfolk and guarding the mouth of the James River. Tore strongly fortified now for the defense of Norfolk than it was in 1813. See Losing's Pictorial [3 more...]
Massanutten Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Massanutten range northward, were perfectly defined. Our driver was a competent guide, being familiar with the events and the localities in that region, and we anticipated a day of pleasure and profit, and were not disappointed. A mile south of Harrisonburg we turned to the left up a rough, lane-like road, that skirted the field upon a ridge in which Ashby was killed. The place of his death was at the edge of a wood two hundred yards north of the road. The abrupt southern end of Massanutten Mountain, on which Jackson had a signal-station while Banks lay near him, arose like a huge buttress above the general level, seven miles to our left, while before us and to the right was a beautiful hill country, bordered by distant mountain ranges. We soon came to the battle-ground of Cross Keys, sketched the Union Church (see page 396), that was in the midst of the storm of conflict, and rode on to Port Republic, twelve miles from Harrisonburg, where we passed over a substantial new bridge
Clear Spring, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
o Winchester, thirteen miles below Middletown; but before Banks's main body had all passed the latter village, the Confederates occupied it in large numbers. The rear-guard were compelled to fall back to Strasburg. Making a circuit to the Northward, Tompkins's First Vermont cavalry rejoined Banks at Winchester the next morning, and De Forest's Fifth New York cavalry made its way among the mountains of the Potomac with a train of thirty-two wagons and many stragglers, and joined Banks at Clear Spring. The main column meanwhile had moved on and encountered a Confederate force near Newton, eight miles from Winchester, which was repulsed by the Second Massachusetts, Twenty-eighth New York, and Twenty-seventh Indiana; and by midnight May 24. the extraordinary race for Winchester was won by Banks, who had made a masterly retreat with very little loss, and had concentrated his infantry and artillery there. Broadhead's cavalry first entered the city. The retreating troops found very li
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
imself and his tardy opponent. The flank movement up the York was not commenced in time to perform its intended service as such. Franklin's long waiting division was not dispatched for that purpose until the day of the battle at Williamsburg, when it was debarked at Yorktown and re-embarked. It arrived at the head of York that night, and on the following morning May 6, 1862. Newton's brigade landed and took position on a plain of a thousand acres of open land, on the right bank of the Pamunkey, one of the streams that form the York river. These are the Pamunkey and the Mattapony. Strictly speaking, these streams do not form the York River, for it is really a long estuary of Chesapeake Bay, and the two rivers are only its chief affluents. Within twenty-fours hours afterward Franklin's whole division had encamped there, and gun-boats had quietly taken possession of West Point, between the Vests House. this was a large brick House, on the main street in Williamsburg, belong
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
to obey, for he felt the importance of his forward movement, but when, at about. five o'clock, he saw the two redoubts nearest Fort Magruder re-occupied by Confederates, and a force moving on his front, and pressing forward with the war-cry of Bull Run! Bull Run! he retired beyond the crest of a ridge, not far from the dam, disputing the ground as he fell back, and there formed a line of battle and awaited Early's approach. When that force was within thirty paces of his line he ordered a genBull Run! he retired beyond the crest of a ridge, not far from the dam, disputing the ground as he fell back, and there formed a line of battle and awaited Early's approach. When that force was within thirty paces of his line he ordered a general bayonet-charge. This was executed with the most determined spirit. The Confederates broke and fled with precipitation, with a loss of over five hundred men. Hancock held his position until Smith sent re-enforcements, by order of McClellan, who had arrived near the field of action, and soon afterward the contest ceased all along the line. So ended the battle of Williamsburg. That post was Battle of Williamsburg. in this plan, a and b indicate the two redoubts on the extreme left of
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
oward Staunton, passing the site of what is known as the Battle of Piedmont (to be mentioned hereafter) at sunset, and arrived at our destination at a late hour in the evening. We spent the next day (Sunday) in Staunton, and on Monday morning departed by railway for the scenes of strife eastward of the Blue Ridge, along the hollow of Rockfish Gap in that range, and through the great tunnel. Magnificent was the panorama seen on our right as we emerged from that dark artificial cavern in the mountains. Skirting the great hill-side along a terrace, we saw, a thousand feet below us, one of those beauteous and fertile valleys with which the mountain regions of Virginia abound. Others opened to our view as we descended gradually into the lower country. We passed the seat of Jefferson, near Charlottesville, at noon, dined at Gordonsville, and lodged that night at Culpepper Court-House. Our experience at the latter place will be considered hereafter. Tail-piece — Punishments in cam
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e a most important movement had been made in McClellan's rear by the Confederates at Norfolk, and by General Wool at Fortress Monroe. Wool, who saw the eminent advantage of the James River as a highway for the supplies of an army on the Peninsula, it was not until after the evacuation of Yorktown, when President Lincoln and Secretaries Chase and Stanton visited Fortress Monroe, that his suggestions were favorably considered. He then renewed his recommendations; and when, on the 8th, May, 1Fort Wool, in the Rip Raps, An unfinished fortification that commanded the entrance to Hampton Roads, in front of Fortress Monroe, It was at first called Fort Calhoun. Its name was changed to Wool, in honor of the veteran General. to deceive themmander then rode back to Ocean View (thus making a journey on horseback that day of thirty-five miles), and reached Fortress Monroe at near midnight with the pleasing intelligence of his success, for the anxious President and Secretary of War. On
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of the Potomac. One was in the Mountain Department, under Fremont; another in the Department of the Shenandoah, under Banks; and a third in the newly created Department of the Rappahannock, under McDowell. At about the time of the siege of Yorktown, early in April, General Fremont was at Franklin, in Pendleton County, over the mountains west of Harrisonburg, with fifteen thousand men; General Banks was at Strasburg, in the Valley, with about sixteen thousand; and General McDowell was at Fredericksburg, on the Rappahannock, with thirty thousand. When the appearance of McClellan on the Peninsula drew Johnston's main body from the Rapid Anna to the defense of Richmond, Washington was relieved, and McDowell's corps was ordered forward to co-operate with the Army of the Potomac; and for this purpose Shields's division was detached from Banks's command and given to McDowell, making the force of the latter about forty-one thousand men and one hundred guns. Such was the disposition of the
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