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Franklin (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the Shenandoah Valley and the adjacent region on both sides of the Blue Ridge. There were three distinct Union armies in that region, acting independently of, but in co-operation with, the Army of the Potomac. One was in the Mountain Department, under Fremont; another in the Department of the Shenandoah, under Banks; and a third in the newly created Department of the Rappahannock, under McDowell. At about the time of the siege of Yorktown, early in April, General Fremont was at Franklin, in Pendleton County, over the mountains west of Harrisonburg, with fifteen thousand men; General Banks was at Strasburg, in the Valley, with about sixteen thousand; and General McDowell was at Fredericksburg, on the Rappahannock, with thirty thousand. When the appearance of McClellan on the Peninsula drew Johnston's main body from the Rapid Anna to the defense of Richmond, Washington was relieved, and McDowell's corps was ordered forward to co-operate with the Army of the Potomac; and for this pu
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
his command on the Hampton or Warwick road; and in the mean time Sumner, with Smith's division, moved on to the point where Stoneman was halting, at five o'clock in the evening. These bivouacked for the night. Hooker pressed forward along the Hampton road, and took position on the left of Smith's at near midnight. Rain was then falling copiously, and the roads were rendered almost impassable. There all rested until dawn, May 5, 1862. when Hooker again pressed forward, and at half-past 5 cafront of a few Confederate regiments. They pushed into the forest and were met by Whiting's division and other troops, forming the rear-guard of Johnston's retreating forces, when a spirited engagement began, chiefly by Hood's Texas brigade and Hampton's (South Carolina) Legion, on the part of the Confederates. The contest was continued for three or four hours, when the cannon on the gun-boats, and batteries that were speedily landed, drove the foe from their shelter in the woods, and kept th
Union Church (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
n the Confederates, that the latter were obliged to turn and fight before attempting the passage of the Shenandoah at Port Republic. Jackson left Ewell with three brigades (Elzy's, Trimble's, and Stewart's) of the rear division of his army at Union Church, about seven miles from Harrisonburg, to keep back the Nationals and gain time, while he should throw forward his own division to cover the bridge at Port Republic, five miles farther on, and prevent Shields from crossing it. Ewell stronglyy so at the center, and continued several hours, Milroy and Schenck all the while gaining ground; the former with heavy loss. The brunt of the battle fell upon him and Stahl, and upon Trimble on the part of the Confederates. Stahl's troops Union Church at Cross Keys. this little picture shows the appearance of the Church when the writer sketched it, in October, 1866. it was built of brick, and stood in a grove of oaks, a short distance from the Port Republic road from Harrison. Burg. It
Craney Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ulted in the surrender of Norfolk, and the evacuation of strong batteries erected by the rebels on Sewell's Point and Craney Island, and the destruction of the rebel iron-clad steamer Merrimack, are regarded by the President as among the most importer magazine, the monster ram was blown into fragments. The Merrimack, then in command of Commodore Tatnall, was at Craney Island, for the two-fold purpose of protecting Norfolk and guarding the mouth of the James River. The land troops had fled to destroy his ship and fly, for with his best efforts he could not get her into the James River. Sewell's Point and Craney Island, both strongly fortified, were abandoned. Craney Island was much more strongly fortified now for the defense of NoCraney Island was much more strongly fortified now for the defense of Norfolk than it was in 1813. See Losing's Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. Captain Case, of the Navy, was the first man to land on the abandoned Island, and to pull down the ensign of rebellion and place the National flag there. The Confedera
Berryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ttle order. Colonel Gordon, commanding the right, was strongly posted on a ridge, a little south of the city, and Colonel Donnelly was in charge of the left. Near the center, the troops were well sheltered from their foes by stone walls. General Hatch (who was cut off at Middletown), with Tompkins's cavalry, had rejoined the army just in time to participate in the battle. The battle opened furiously in front of Winchester. May 25, 1862. Ewell had placed a heavy body of troops on the Berryville road, to prevent re-enforcements reaching Banks from Harper's Ferry, and regiments were heavily massed on the National right, with the evident intention of turning it. This danger was so boldly and bravely met, that the Confederates were kept in check for five hours by a steady and most destructive fire. , One regiment, says Banks in his report, is represented, by persons present during the action, and after the field was evacuated, as nearly destroyed. In the mean time Jackson's wh
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
that city at the narrowest part of the Peninsula the right resting on a deep ravine near the James River, and the left on Queen's Creek, near the York River. The principal work was Fort Edwin V. Norfolk, and by General Wool at Fortress Monroe. Wool, who saw the eminent advantage of the James River as a highway for the supplies of an army on the Peninsula, had, ever since McClellan decided t Craney Island, for the two-fold purpose of protecting Norfolk and guarding the mouth of the James River. The land troops had fled without informing Tatnall of the movement, and the unfortunate oldter than to destroy his ship and fly, for with his best efforts he could not get her into the James River. Sewell's Point and Craney Island, both strongly fortified, were abandoned. Craney Island n the ensign of rebellion and place the National flag there. The Confederate gun-boats in the James River fled toward Richmond, and the navigation of that stream was opened to the National vessels.
Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
est's Fifth New York cavalry made its way among the mountains of the Potomac with a train of thirty-two wagons and many stragglers, and joined Banks at Clear Spring. The main column meanwhile had moved on and encountered a Confederate force near Newton, eight miles from Winchester, which was repulsed by the Second Massachusetts, Twenty-eighth New York, and Twenty-seventh Indiana; and by midnight May 24. the extraordinary race for Winchester was won by Banks, who had made a masterly retreat wit front of Winchester, for he was seven miles in the rear. So ignorant was he of the situation of affairs at the front, that at the moment when Banks was about to retreat, Colonel Crutchfield came to Ewell with orders from Jackson to fall back to Newton, seven miles distant, for the Nationals were being heavily re-enforced. Jackson supposed Ewell to be four or five miles from Winchester, when, as we have observed, he had encamped within a mile and a half of the city the evening before. it is e
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
suit of the fugitives Confederate works at Williamsburg, 378. Hooker's advance upon them, 379. battle near Williamsburg Hooker bears the Brunt, 380. Kearney's troops on the field, 381. Hancock's across the gently rolling plateau on which Williamsburg stands. These were two miles in front of teet's division, which had passed on through Williamsburg, had been sent back by Johnston to support on's Flying Artillery in the advance toward Williamsburg on the 4th, and in the encounter in which Sen Longstreet had commenced his flight from Williamsburg with such haste as to leave nearly eight huhe War Department, from Bivouac in front of Williamsburg, that the Confederates were before him in fnd before he was ready to move forward from Williamsburg. On the morning after the battle May 6,ance in June, 1866, when the writer visited Williamsburg, is given in the above sketch. two rivers,ellan's pursuit of Johnston nearly ended at Williamsburg, where his sick and wounded were placed in [9 more...]
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ape was to cross the swollen Shenandoah at Port Republic, where there was a strong bridge; so, aftettempting the passage of the Shenandoah at Port Republic. Jackson left Ewell with three brigades (rd his own division to cover the bridge at Port Republic, five miles farther on, and prevent Shielda grove of oaks, a short distance from the Port Republic road from Harrison. Burg. Its interior wacalled to aid Jackson in his operations at Port Republic. His troops slept on their arms, and justean time there had been stirring events at Port Republic. Jackson had crossed the Shenandoah, and tore, and a portion of it had arrived near Port Republic almost simultaneously with Jackson's advan and halted that night within six miles of Port Republic. He was informed that Jackson's train wasing--Through God's blessing the enemy near Port Republic was this day routed, with the loss of six t of the storm of conflict, and rode on to Port Republic, twelve miles from Harrisonburg, where we [4 more...]
Fort Calhoun (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
oughby's Point, and along the coast toward the sea, when it was decided to land five thousand troops at a summer watering-place called Ocean View, by which the works on Sewell's Point could be taken in reverse, and a direct route to Norfolk be opened. The troops were again embarked, and a bombardment was opened on Sewell's Point from Fort Wool, in the Rip Raps, An unfinished fortification that commanded the entrance to Hampton Roads, in front of Fortress Monroe, It was at first called Fort Calhoun. Its name was changed to Wool, in honor of the veteran General. to deceive the Confederates with the appearance of a design to renew the attempt to land there. At a little past midnight, the troops, artillery, infantry, and cavalry, The troops composing the expedition consisted of the Tenth, Twentieth, and Ninety-ninth New York; Sixteenth Massachusetts; First Delaware; Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania; one hundred mounted riflemen; Follet's battery of light artillery, and Howard's battery
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