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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 16
ad been made in McClellan's rear by the Confederates at Norfolk, and by General Wool at Fortress Monroe. Wool, who saw the eminent advantage of the James River as a highway for the supplies of an army on the Peninsula, had, ever since McClellan decided to take that route to Richmond, urged the Government to allow him to attempt the capture of Norfolk, and thus make the breaking up of the blockade of the James an easy matter. But it was not until after the evacuation of Yorktown, when President Lincoln and Secretaries Chase and Stanton visited Fortress Monroe, that his suggestions were favorably considered. He then renewed his recommendations; and when, on the 8th, May, 1862. he received positive information that Huger (who, with Burnside in his rear and McClellan on his flank, saw that his position was untenable) was preparing to evacuate that post, orders were given for an immediate attempt to seize Sewell's Point, and march on Norfolk. Arrangements were made with Commodore Gold
C. H. Tompkins (search for this): chapter 16
hester, thirteen miles below Middletown; but before Banks's main body had all passed the latter village, the Confederates occupied it in large numbers. The rear-guard were compelled to fall back to Strasburg. Making a circuit to the Northward, Tompkins's First Vermont cavalry rejoined Banks at Winchester the next morning, and De Forest's Fifth New York cavalry made its way among the mountains of the Potomac with a train of thirty-two wagons and many stragglers, and joined Banks at Clear Springht, was strongly posted on a ridge, a little south of the city, and Colonel Donnelly was in charge of the left. Near the center, the troops were well sheltered from their foes by stone walls. General Hatch (who was cut off at Middletown), with Tompkins's cavalry, had rejoined the army just in time to participate in the battle. The battle opened furiously in front of Winchester. May 25, 1862. Ewell had placed a heavy body of troops on the Berryville road, to prevent re-enforcements reaching
Philip Kearney (search for this): chapter 16
r Williamsburg Hooker bears the Brunt, 380. Kearney's troops on the field, 381. Hancock's flank he divisions of Generals Joseph Hooker and Philip Kearney, and on the Winn's Mill road, which joins five o'clock, when the gallant and dashing Philip Kearney came up with his division, with orders frooker's worn and fearfully thinned regiments. Kearney pressed to the front, and Hooker's troops withousand seven hundred of their companions. Kearney deployed Berry's brigade to the left of the W support. The battle, which was lagging when Kearney arrived, was renewed with spirit, and the Nater prevented all direct forward movement, and Kearney ordered the Thirty-eighth New York (Scott Lifneteen officers. It did not quite accomplish Kearney's full desire, and he ordered the left wing oced some confusion and misapprehension. When Kearney arrived on the field he ranked Hooker; and alt his horse at two o'clock, and at five, when Kearney and Hancock were about giving the blow that w
John Bowen (search for this): chapter 16
rty-six miles west of Staunton, whither Schenck hastened with a part of his brigade to assist him. Jackson had also hurried. from Staunton to assist Johnson, and on the 8th he appeared with a large force on a ridge overlooking the National camp, and commenced planting a battery there. Milroy led a force to dislodge him, These consisted of the Twenty-fifth, Thirty-second, Seventy-fifth, and Eighty-second Ohio and Third. Virginia, with a 6-pounder of the Twelfth Ohio battery, under Lieutenant Bowen. and for about five hours a battle, varying in intensity, was fought with great gallantry on both sides. Darkness put an end to the conflict. Schenck (who ranked Milroy) saw that the position of the Nationals was untenable, and by his direction the whole force retreated during the night to Franklin, having lost two hundred and fifty-six men, of whom one hundred and forty-five were only slightly wounded. Jackson reported a loss of four hundred and sixty-one, of whom three hundred and
Darius N. Couch (search for this): chapter 16
eph Hooker and Philip Kearney, and on the Winn's Mill road, which joins the former within two miles of Williamsburg, by the divisions of Generals W. F. Smith, Darius N. Couch, and Silas Casey. Those of Generals Israel B. Richardson, John Sedgwick, and Fitz-John Porter, were moved to the vicinity of Yorktown, to be ready to go forwhis thanks; the latter having carefully reconnoitered such of the Confederate works as were concealed from view. excepting by the brigade of General J. J. Peck, of Couch's division, which arrived on the field early in the afternoon, and was posted on Hooker's right. There it acted as a continually repelling foil to the attacks of the Confederates, until near night, when it was relieved by two other of Couch's brigades. Finally the ammunition of some of Hooker's regiments, and also of the artillery, began to fail, Some of the shattered regiments were supplied with ammunition for a time only from the cartridge-boxes of their fallen comrades on the field.
Winfield S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 16
t, 380. Kearney's troops on the field, 381. Hancock's flank movement, 382. close of the battle oed on the soddened battle-field. Meanwhile Hancock had been successfully engaged in his flank mole and a half eastward of the Yorktown road. Hancock d crossed the creek, took possession of the rs soon drove the Confederates from them. But Hancock's force was too small to make their occupatioon of the two redoubts on his extreme left by Hancock was the first intimation that Johnston had ofa and North Carolina troops, was assigned. Hancock had earnestly called for re-enforcements, buttation, with a loss of over five hundred men. Hancock held his position until Smith sent re-enforcehe extreme left of the Confederates, taken by Hancock, and c the point to which Stoneman fell back o wait for re-enforcements. already won, for Hancock held the key of the position. McClellan repoat two o'clock, and at five, when Kearney and Hancock were about giving the blow that won the victo[2 more...]
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 16
vis and two of his so-called cabinet, and Generals Johnston, Lee, and Magruder, held a council at the Nelson House, This wn of Washington, and wife of the Confederate Commander, Robert E. Lee. It stood on or near the site of the dwelling known as. It was occupied, when the war broke out, by a son of Robert E. Lee. The wife and some of the family of Lee, who were therLee, who were there, fled from it on the approach of the National army, at the time we are considering. The first officer who entered the houstry Members of the Second regiment of cavalry, of which Robert E. Lee was Lieutenant-colonel when he abandoned his flag, weres watching Banks closely, with orders to hold him, while General Lee, with a strong column, should push beyond the Rappahannotion between Winchester and Alexandria, On the 5th of May Lee wrote to Ewell that he had ordered North Carolina troops to etween Winchester and Alexandria. --Autograph letter of Robert E. Lee. This was precisely such a movement as the Government
William M. Vest (search for this): chapter 16
e shelter of the fortifications around Richmond before he was ready to move forward from Williamsburg. On the morning after the battle May 6, 1862, the National troops took possession of Williamsburg, and General McClellan, from the house of Mr. Vest, Johnston's late Headquarters, telegraphed to the Secretary of War a brief account of the events of the previous day, and concluded with the prediction that was so terribly fulfilled--We have other battles to fight before reaching Richmond. At twenty-fours hours afterward Franklin's whole division had encamped there, and gun-boats had quietly taken possession of West Point, between the Vests House. this was a large brick House, on the main street in Williamsburg, belonging to William M. Vest, and was used by the commanders of both armies. Its appearance in June, 1866, when the writer visited Williamsburg, is given in the above sketch. two rivers, and the National flag was unfurled over that little village, from which every whi
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 16
ed the Government to allow him to attempt the capture of Norfolk, and thus make the breaking up of the blockade of the James an easy matter. But it was not until after the evacuation of Yorktown, when President Lincoln and Secretaries Chase and Stanton visited Fortress Monroe, that his suggestions were favorably considered. He then renewed his recommendations; and when, on the 8th, May, 1862. he received positive information that Huger (who, with Burnside in his rear and McClellan on his flaor the anxious President and Secretary of War. On the following morning he received publicly expressed thanks for his achievement. The skillful and gallant movements of Major-general John E. Wool, and the forces under his command, said Secretary Stanton, in an order issued by direction of the President, on the 11th, which resulted in the surrender of Norfolk, and the evacuation of strong batteries erected by the rebels on Sewell's Point and Craney Island, and the destruction of the rebel i
up the Valley as Banks had made down it, for he was threatened with immediate peril. General Shields, as we have observed, had been ordered to join McDowell in a movement toward Richmond, to co-operate with McClellan. He reached McDowell's camp with eleven thousand men on the day of the battle of Winchester. May 23. On the following day the President and Secretary of War arrived there, when McDowell, whose army was then forty-one thousand strong, was ordered to move toward Richmond on the 26th. That order was countermanded a few hours later, for, on their return to Washington, the President and his War Minister were met by startling tidings from the Shenandoah Valley. The safety of the National capital seemed to be in great peril, and McDowell was ordered to push twenty thousand men into the Valley by way of the Manassas Gap Railroad, to intercept Jackson if he should retreat. At the same time Fremont was ordered by telegraph to hasten with his army over the Shenandoah Mountain
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