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Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
John A. McClernand's Brigade, composed of the Twenty-seventh, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Illinois, commanded respectively by Colonels N. B. Buford, Philip B. Fouke, and John A. Logan; and a company of cavalry led by Captain J. J. Dollins. To these were added another company of cavalry under Lieutenant J. R. Catlin, and Captain Ezra Taylor's Chicago Light Artillery of six. pieces an . 114 men, all Illinois Volunteers. Also the Twenty-second Illinois, Colonel H. Dougherty, and the Seventh; Iowa, Colonel Lauman. in four steam transports, convoyed by the wooden gunboats Tyier and Lexington, commanded respectively by Captains Walke and Stemble. They lay at Island No.1, eleven miles above Columbus, that night. There Grant received information that Polk was sending troops across to Belmont, to cut off Colonel Oglesby. At dawn the next morning, he pressed forward and landed his forces at Hunter's Point, on the Missouri shore, three miles above Belmont, where a battalion was left to gua
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
onflict for the National life. At about the same time, William Nelson, another loyal Kentuckian, established a similar rendezvous in Garrard County, in Eastern Kentucky, called Camp Dick Robinson. Both of these men were afterward major-generals in the National Volunteer service. The Government encouraged these Union movements. All Kentucky, within a hundred miles south of the Ohio River, had been made a military department, at the head of which was placed Robert Anderson, the hero of Fort Sumter, who, on the 14th of May, had been commissioned a brigadier-general of Volunteers. Headquarters at camp Dick Robinson. When Union camps were formed in Kentucky, Magoffin became concerned about the violated neutrality of his State, and he finally wrote to the President, Aug. 19, 1861. by the hands of a committee, urging him to remove from the limits of Kentucky the forces organized in camps and mustered into the National service. The President not only refused compliance with his
Solingen (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 4
Fremont, in her Story of the Guard, page 201. and at an assemblage of the citizens, resolutions of confidence and sympathy, and an address, were adopted. Afterward he was presented with an elegant sword in token of profound regard, which was inscribed with these words :--to the path-Finder, by the men of the West. Fremont had long before been called The, Pathfinder, because of his wonderful explorations among the Rocky Mountains. The blade of the sword now presented to him was made at Solingen, on the Rhine. The scabbard was of silver, with a design near its upper part, four inches in length. In its center was a bust of Fremont sculptured out of gold, in high relief, with a rich border of diamonds, and on each side a sculptured figure of fame. In the rear of the hilt was a hollow, arched at the top so as to form a canopy for a figure of America, at the foot of which, in the midst of appropriate surroundings, was a medallion of blue enamel, bearing the initials J. C. F. in diam
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rce and Sikeston, to pursue Thompson in conjunction with some troops from Ironton, and had been informed that Polk was sending re-enforcements to Price from Columbus. In this situation of affairs, he determined to threaten Columbus by attacking Belmont, a little village and landing-place on the Missouri shore opposite, and break up the connection between Polk and Price. Oglesbys force was deflected toward New Madrid, Field of operations against Belmont. and ColonelW. H. L. Wallace, of Illinois, was sent from Cairo to re-enforce him. The movement on Belmont would keep Polk from interfering with Grant's troops in pursuit of Thompson. General Charles F. Smith, a soldier of rare qualities, was. now in command at Paducah. Grant requested him to make. a demonstration toward Columbus, to attract the attention of Polk, and at the same time he sent a force down the Kentucky shore to Ellicott's. Mills, about twelve miles above Columbus. When these deceptive movements were put in oper
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
troying the enemy, before McCulloch, who was gathering strength in Arkansas to return to Missouri, should rejoin Price. Believing the latter rious alarm. McCulloch, as we have seen, had left him and gone to Arkansas, and Pillow and Hardee had abandoned Southeastern Missouri, and tawho had promised an escort for an ammunition train to be sent from Arkansas to Price, not only withheld that promised aid, but arrested the pr. These adverse circumstances compelled Price to retreat toward Arkansas. He abandoned Lexington on the 30th of September, 1861. leaving perse the forces of Price, and seizing Little Rock, the capital of Arkansas, so completely turn the position of the Confederate forces under Pardeau and Bird's Point, to assist Carlin in driving Thompson into Arkansas, he was ready to move quickly and effectively. Grant had already ents; and Governor Pettus, of Mississippi, and Governor Rector, of Arkansas, were implored for aid. But these men perceived the peril threaten
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d of September, De Russey, Polk's aid-de-camp, telegraphed to the same officer, that the general-commanding determines, with troops now at Union City, to fall at once upon Columbus ; and directed Pillow to take his whole command immediately to Island No.10. This was done, and on the 4th Sept., 1861. Polk seized Hickman and Columbus, and commenced the erection of batteries on the bluff near the latter place. Columbus is in Hickman County, about twenty miles below the mouth of the Ohio River.s. Also the Twenty-second Illinois, Colonel H. Dougherty, and the Seventh; Iowa, Colonel Lauman. in four steam transports, convoyed by the wooden gunboats Tyier and Lexington, commanded respectively by Captains Walke and Stemble. They lay at Island No.1, eleven miles above Columbus, that night. There Grant received information that Polk was sending troops across to Belmont, to cut off Colonel Oglesby. At dawn the next morning, he pressed forward and landed his forces at Hunter's Point, on t
Neosho, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ed only, it is believed, because its progress was suddenly checked when the most reasonable promises of abundant success were presented. That check was given on the morning of the 2d of November, when a courier arrived at Headquarters with an order from General Scott, directing General Fremont to turn over his command to General David Hunter, then some distance in the rear. This order came when the army was excited by the prospect of a battle almost immediately. Price had at first fled to Neosho, There Jackson and the disloyal Legislature of Missouri met, as we have observed (note 2, page 57), under Price's protection. when, finding Fremont still in pursuit, he pushed on to Pineville, in the extreme South-western part of Missouri. Further than that his State Guard were not disposed to go. He was unwilling to leave Missouri without measuring strength and powers with Fremont, so he changed front and prepared to receive him. This attitude gave rise to startling rumors in Fremont's
Ivy Creek (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
st, and Fifty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, under Colonels Harris, Norton, and Tyffe; a battalion of Kentucky volunteers, commanded by Colonel C. A. Marshall, and two sections of artillery, in charge of Captain Konkle. directly toward Pikeville, twenty-eight miles distant, a battalion of Kentucky volunteers, under Colonel C. A. Marshall, in advance. They met picket-guards eight miles from that village. The road now lay along a narrow shelf cut in a high mountain side, ending in a steep ridge at Ivy Creek, which bent around it. There lay the Confederates in ambush, and did not fire until Marshall's battalion was close upon them. Then a volley was poured upon his men, and a sharp skirmish ensued. Confederates on the opposite side of the creek joined in the attack; but, after a contest of almost an hour and a half; all the insurgents fled, leaving thirty of their comrades dead on the field. How much greater was their loss was not ascertained. Nelson's loss was six killed and twenty-four w
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
. General Grant takes military possession of Paducah end of the neutrality flight of secessionisements came from General Ulysses S. Grant, at Paducah, for the Confederates, then in possession of ickman, and Columbus, were preparing to seize Paducah and Cairo, I judged it impossible, without lo Cairo. and Cape Girardeau, to Fort Holt and Paducah, of which places we have taken possession. Anel Rousseau. I have re-enforced, yesterday, Paducah with two regiments, and will continue to strearound Cairo. He took military possession of Paducah, Sept. 6, 1861. at the mouth of the Tennesse have observed, had taken possession of Paducah, in Kentucky, Sept. 6, 1861. on hearing of the invaio, half a mile below the Pontoon Bridge at Paducah. town. A pontoon bridge is a portable strttle resistance to a current. The river at Paducah is 3,600 feet across. The bridge was construier of rare qualities, was. now in command at Paducah. Grant requested him to make. a demonstrati
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
re of the Confederate batteries on the Iron Banks, turning once to punish severely some of Cheatham's troops on his flank, and once again to send back in confusion some of Pillow's men, under Colonel Marks, who had endeavored to cut him off from his boats. He finally reached his landing-place, and embarked, after suffering severely. The fight had been gallant on both sides. In a general order, Nov. 8th, General Grant said: It has been my fortune to have been in all the battles fought in Mexico by Generals Scott and Taylor, save Buena Vista, and I never saw one more hotly contested, or where troops behaved with more gallantry. In his report on the 12th, he spoke in highest terms of General McClernand, as being in the midst of danger throughout the engagement, displaying coolness and judgment and having had his horse shot three times. Grant's horse was also shot under him. Colonel Dougherty, of the Twenty-second Illinois, was three times wounded, and finally taken prisoner. Major
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