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Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
force under your command, compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success Camp Douglas. of the Confederate arms yesterday, to accept the ungenerous and unchivalrous terms which you propose. This was followed by the speedy surrender of the fort, with thirteen thousand five hundred men, as prisoners of war (including the sick and wounded), a large proportion of whom were sent to Camp Douglas, near Chicago ; Generals Buckner and Tilghman, who were captured at Fort Henry, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Leading Unionists of Kentucky asked for the surrender of Buckner to the civil authorities of that State, to be tried for treason against that commonwealth. The application was refused, and he was afterward exchanged. Camp Douglas was so named in honor of Senator Douglas, and was situated on land that had belonged to him. regiments, that performed such signal service, were drilled. It was converted into a prison, and early in April, 1862, after the battle of Shiloh
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t gratifying evidences of genuine Union feeling in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. The river banks in plassible, and then, with a heavy force, march across Tennessee and penetrate Alabama. Foote had already hurried e men. These consisted of thirteen regiments of Tennessee troops, two of Kentucky, six of Mississippi, one oa, four of Virginia, two independent battalions of Tennessee infantry, and a regiment of cavalry, under the aftin's brigade of three regiments of Mississippi and Tennessee troops in advance, followed by four Virginia regim in perfect safety at his home in Columbia, in Middle Tennessee, he sat down a few days afterward to write a rorgotten. On the following day, two regiments of Tennessee Plan of the siege of Fort Donelson. troops, thahe way in the Valley of the Lower Mississippi, the Tennessee, and the Cumberland. You have carried the flag of pathways and battle-fields of the great armies in Tennessee, Georgia, and Virginia. The aspect of Nashville
Tyrone (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ngers, as far as Clarksville, sixty miles down the Cumberland River, consisted of about two hundred colored soldiers, who had just been paid off and discharged from the service. The few white passengers on board, and the officers and crew of the Tyrone, who were mostly secessionists, were greatly relieved when these soldiers debarked at midnight, for the fearful massacre of negroes at Memphis had just occurred, and they did not know what might be the temper of these troops on that account. Theman among them. They were too full of joy to think of mischief. The shores of the Cumberland resounded with their songs and laughter, for they were all happy in the thought of money in their pockets, and the greetings of friends at home. The Tyrone lay at Clarksville until daylight, when the writer had the opportunity to make a sketch of Fort Bruce and its vicinity, events at which will be considered presently. We left there while breakfasting; and nearly all of that beautiful day we were
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
n full retreat over upon General Buckner, when, by his attack in flank and rear, they could cut up the enemy and put him completely to rout. Pillow's report to Captain Clarence Derrick, Assistant Adjutant-General, written at his home in Columbia, Tennessee, on the 18th of February, 1862. McClernand's division was well posted to resist the assailants, had they been on the alert; but the movement of the Confederates appears not to have been even suspected. Reveille was just sounding, and The thief is a coward by nature's law; Who betrays the State, to no one is true; And the brave foe at Fort Donelson saw Their light-fingered Floyd was light-footed too. Pillow sneaked away in the darkness, and, in perfect safety at his home in Columbia, in Middle Tennessee, he sat down a few days afterward to write a report to his indignant superiors. Forest and his horsemen, about eight hundred in number, also escaped. There is not in all history a meaner picture of the conduct of traitors
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
artillery. On the 11th, General Grant called a council of war, which was composed of his division commanders and several acting brigadiers. Shall we march on Donelson, or wait for further re-enforcements? was the question considered. Information that heavy re-enforcements were hastening toward that stronghold carried a decisthe attack on Fort Henry, which was only twelve miles distant, he gave it all the re-enforcements in his power. I determined, he said, to fight for Nashville at Donelson, and have the best part of my army to do it, and so he sent sixteen thousand troops there, retaining only fourteen thousand men to cover his front at Bowling Greairo, from which it was telegraphed to General McClellan by General George W. Cullum, Halleck's Chief of Staff, then at Cairo, saying: The Union flag floats over Donelson. The Carondelet, Captain Walke, brings the glorious intelligence. The fort surrendered at nine o'clock yesterday (Sunday) morning. Generals Buckner, Bushrod R
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
nelson, 227. Nashville, 229. The fall of Fort Henry was followed by immediate preparations for at, in charge of a portion of his flotilla at Fort Henry. With the spirit of the old Puritans (from at Cairo, on the Sunday after the capture of Fort Henry, The congregation were disappointed by thigadier-general on the day of the capture of Fort Henry. His commission was dated September 3d, 1he Confederates up the stream. Route from Fort Henry to Fort Donelson Let us observe the chas Buckner and Tilghman, who were captured at Fort Henry, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor.e calamitous occurrences at Forts Donelson and Henry, and at Roanoke Island. --War of the Rebellionaboard. Being the first division to enter Fort Henry, you also pursued the enemy for miles, captuangerous to the life of the Republic. At Forts Henry and Donelson was successfully begun that arxhibited even so early as at the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson, and it never failed to give a[6 more...]
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
de works, and Lower water battery. their embrasures were revetted with coffee-sacks filled with sand. The lower or principal battery was armed with eight 32-pounders, and one 10-inch Columbiad; and the other bore a heavy rifled cannon that carried a 128-pound bolt, flanked by two 32-pound carronades. A carronade is a short piece of ordnance, having a large caliber, and a chamber for the powder like a mortar. It is similar to the howitzer. Its name is derived from Carron, a place in Scotland, where it was first manufactured. The only guns in the fort (which was at a mean elevation above the river of nearly one hundred feet) were four light siege-guns, a 12-pound howitzer, two 24-pounders, and one 64-pound howitzer. Back of the fort the forest was cut down, and supporting field works were erected for the use of infantry and artillery. Still farther back, at the mean distance of a mile from the fort, was an irregular and detached line of light intrenchments for riflemen, fronti
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
rces under my command, incident to an unexpected change of commanders, and the overwhelming force under your command, compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success Camp Douglas. of the Confederate arms yesterday, to accept the ungenerous and unchivalrous terms which you propose. This was followed by the speedy surrender of the fort, with thirteen thousand five hundred men, as prisoners of war (including the sick and wounded), a large proportion of whom were sent to Camp Douglas, near Chicago ; Generals Buckner and Tilghman, who were captured at Fort Henry, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Leading Unionists of Kentucky asked for the surrender of Buckner to the civil authorities of that State, to be tried for treason against that commonwealth. The application was refused, and he was afterward exchanged. Camp Douglas was so named in honor of Senator Douglas, and was situated on land that had belonged to him. regiments, that performed such signal service, were dr
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
hat system was continued until the troops were called to the field in the spring of 1862. Then the mails were brigaded, placed in canvas bags, labeled and addressed to the brigade, and forwarded to their destination by steamer or railway, under military authority. The Post-office Department had no further control of the army mail after it left the post-office at Washington City. During the Peninsula campaign, the mail for the Army of the Potomac was forwarded from Washington by way of Baltimore and Old Point Comfort, the Potomac being blockaded by shore batteries. At the same time, the troops in the Shenandoah Valley were supplied with a mail service by way of Harper's Ferry, the mails being sent under military control to that place, over the Baltimore and Ohio railway, and there furnished to the brigades when called for. Owing to the peculiar condition of affairs in that region, much of the time there was very little regularity in the delivery of the mails, and communication be
Douglass (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
r my command, incident to an unexpected change of commanders, and the overwhelming force under your command, compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success Camp Douglas. of the Confederate arms yesterday, to accept the ungenerous and unchivalrous terms which you propose. This was followed by the speedy surrender of the fort, with thirteen thousand five hundred men, as prisoners of war (including the sick and wounded), a large proportion of whom were sent to Camp Douglas, near Chicago ; Generals Buckner and Tilghman, who were captured at Fort Henry, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Leading Unionists of Kentucky asked for the surrender oner to the civil authorities of that State, to be tried for treason against that commonwealth. The application was refused, and he was afterward exchanged. Camp Douglas was so named in honor of Senator Douglas, and was situated on land that had belonged to him. regiments, that performed such signal service, were drilled. It w
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