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rders. General Burnside, who, since his retirement from the command of the Army of the Ohio, at Knoxville, in December, had been at Annapolis, in Maryland, reorganizing and recruiting his old Ninth Corps, was ready for the field at the middle of April. His corps (composed partly of colored troops) was reviewed by the President on the 23d of that month, when it passed into Virginia and joined the Army of the Potomac. With this accession of force, that army, at the close of April, numbered oveApril, numbered over one hundred thousand men. Re-enforcements had been pouring in during that month, and before its close Grant and Meade had perfected their arrangements for a grand advance of the Army of the Potomac and its auxiliaries. The staff of General Grant was nearly thirty less in number than that of General McClellan, and was composed of fourteen officers, as follows; Brigadier-General John A. Rawlins, chief of staff; Lieutenant-Colonel T. S. Bowers and Captain E. S. Parker, assistant adjutants-gen
, by her recreant son, General Sterling Price, which had both a military and political object in view, and, when undertaken, might have been most disastrous to the National cause but for the sleepless vigilance of General Rosecrans, who, late in January, had arrived Jan. 28. at St. Louis as commander of the Department of Missouri. He soon discovered that the State was seriously menaced by openly armed foes on one side, and by hidden and malignant ones on the other, and within its bosom, in thhe Fourth Illinois Cavalry, under Major Davidson, who thoroughly dispersed the Confederates and captured General Vance, with a part of his staff and about a hundred men, and recaptured the prisoners and wagons. From that time until the close of January, Sturgis was continually menaced by Longstreet, who appeared to be determined to repossess himself of Knoxville; but his movement was only a mask, behind which his army soon retired into Virginia. At the beginning of January, 1864, some spicy
October 20th (search for this): chapter 10
uing General Smith been detained at the Lamine River, on account of the destruction of the railway bridge at the crossing on his route. There he was overtaken by General Mower, when, with a few days' provisions, and in light marching order, he pushed on directly westward, toward Warrensburg, while Pleasanton, with his cavalry, including those under Winslow, was sweeping over the country northward to the Missouri River, in the direction of Lexington, which Price's advance reached on the 20th of October. Blunt, who had come out of Kansas, had been driven back to Independence, near the western border of Missouri, by Price, and the ranks of the latter were being increased by recruits. And now a single false step of the pursuers deprived them of the solid advantages they had been gaining. Rosecrans, at St. Louis, not fully comprehending the importance of cutting off Price's retreat into Arkansas, ordered Pleasanton (by telegraph) to move directly on Lexington, and directed Smith to a
September 4th, 1810 AD (search for this): chapter 10
Andrew Johnson, then acting President of the United States. This was for many years the home of Andrew Johnson, and the place of his useful business as the maker of garments, in which, it is said, he excelled, and was consequently prosperous. While in Greenville we were shown his family Bible, in which, in the beautiful handwriting of Valentine Sevier, Clerk of the Circuit Court, were the following records:-- Andrew Johnson, born 29th December, 1807. Eliza, his wife, born 4th September, 1810. Married, at Greenville, by Mordecai Lincoln, Esq., on the 17th day of May, 1827, Andrew Johnson to Eliza McCardal. That excellent young woman, then only seventeen years of age, taught her husband, aged twenty years, to read and write. From that humble social position he rose to the highest public one in the gift of his countrymen. When the writer was at Greenville, Mr. Johnson's place of business was pointed out to him. It had lately been repaired, and the sign, A. Johnson,
December 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 10
essee, before we proceed to a consideration of the great campaigns against Richmond and Atlanta which Lieutenant-General Grant organized after his appointment to the chief command of the Armies of the Republic. On the retirement of Longstreet from Knoxville See page 175. and his withdrawal toward Virginia, he was pursued by cavalry under Shackleford, Wolford, Graham, and Foster, into Jefferson County, where, near Bean's Station, on the Morristown and Cumberland Gap road, he turned Dec. 14, 1863. sharply upon his pursuers. A brisk conflict was kept up until night, when the Nationals had been pushed back nearly a mile. The contest was indecisive, but somewhat sanguinary, Shackleford, who was in chief command of the pursuers, losing about two hundred men. Longstreet's loss, it was computed, was much greater. He sought, during the struggle, to strike Shackleford in the rear, by sending a force down the left bank of the Holston, to cross at Kelly's Ford, and come up from the west
e Confederates. Other military movements in that mountain region were so intimately connected with, and auxiliary to, those of the Army of the Potomac against Richmond, that we will now turn to a consideration of the general events of that campaign from the Rapid Anna to the James, after noticing earlier movements of some detachments of National troops on the flanks and rear of the Army of Northern Virginia. The first of these movements which attracted much attention occurred early in February, when General B. F. Butler, then in command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, lately vacated by General Foster, planned and attempted the capture of Richmond, and the release of the Union ,prisoners there, by a sudden descent upon it. Arrangements were made for a diversion in favor of this movement by the Army of the Potomac, and when, on the 5th of February, 1864. a column of cavalry and infantry, under General Wistar, about fifteen hundred strong, pushed rapidly northward
October 28th (search for this): chapter 10
ey reached Newtonia, in the southwest corner of Missouri. Price was then moving at a panic pace, strewing the line of his march with the wrecks of wagons and other materials of war, broken and burnt. He turned at Newtonia and offered battle. October 28. He was gaining decided advantages, when Sandborn, who had marched one hundred and two miles in thirty-six hours, came up and assisted in defeating him. Price again fled, and made his way into Western Arkansas, followed by Curtis, who found Nod to the care of his foe. Encouraged by this success, Breckinridge soon moved into East Tennessee, and threatened Knoxville. Meanwhile General Gillem discovered a Confederate force in his rear, at Morristown, when he attacked them suddenly, Oct. 28. routed them, and inflicted upon them a loss of four hundred men and four guns. Soon after this Breckinridge moved cautiously forward, and on a very dark night Nov. 12, 13. fell suddenly upon Gillem, at Bull's Gap, charged gallantly up a steep
March 14th (search for this): chapter 10
State Constitutional Convention, Jan. 8. at Little Rock, in which forty-two of the fifty-four counties in the State were represented. A State Constitution was framed, whereby slavery was forever prohibited. Isaac C. Murphy, the only stanch Unionist in the Secession Convention of that State [see page 474, volume I.], was chosen Provisional Governor, and duly inaugurated, Jan. 22. with C. C. Bliss Lieutenant-Governor, and R. J. T. White Secretary of State. The Constitution was ratified March 14. by a vote of the people of the State, there being 12,177 in favor of it, and only 226 against it. Representatives in Congress and State officers were chosen under it, and the Legislature elected April 25. United States Senators. By every usual form the State was restored to its proper situation in the Union, in partial accordance with the terms of the President's Proclamation. See page 232. Such was its position when the military power of the Government began to wane, at the close of Ma
January 8th (search for this): chapter 10
o the Confederates, had a disastrous effect upon the Union cause and people in that State, where the restoration of civil power in loyal hands, amply sustained by the military, had been, it was believed, made permanent. The occupation of Little Rock by General Steele in the autumn of 1863, and the seeming acquiescence of the Confederates in the necessity of giving up the State to National rule, emboldened the Unionists, who finally met, by delegates, in a State Constitutional Convention, Jan. 8. at Little Rock, in which forty-two of the fifty-four counties in the State were represented. A State Constitution was framed, whereby slavery was forever prohibited. Isaac C. Murphy, the only stanch Unionist in the Secession Convention of that State [see page 474, volume I.], was chosen Provisional Governor, and duly inaugurated, Jan. 22. with C. C. Bliss Lieutenant-Governor, and R. J. T. White Secretary of State. The Constitution was ratified March 14. by a vote of the people of the S
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