hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 848 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 615 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 439 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 392 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 374 0 Browse Search
George G. Meade 374 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 371 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 355 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 344 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 343 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,441 total hits in 389 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
some troops that came up from Richmond, under the Maryland traitor, Belle Isle this is from a sketch made by the author immediately after the evacuation of Richmond, in April, 1865, from the high bank of the James River, near the Tredegar works. Looking across that stream southward. Bradley T. Johnson. These he defeated, in a sharp skirmish, when he struck across the South Anna, and cut the Fredericksburg and Richmond railway at Kilby Station. This accomplished, he pushed on by Ashland, and along the Brooks turnpike, and, early on the first day of March, 1864. halted within three miles and a half of Richmond, and within its outer line of fortifications, at which the Confederates had thrown down their arms and then fled into the city. At Spottsylvania Court-House, about five hundred of Kilpatrick's best men, led by Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, a dashing young officer, and son of Admiral Dahlgren, then before Charleston, diverged from the main column, for the purpose of swee
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ouched by his guns. General Pleasanton arrived at Jefferson City on the day after Price left it, assumed chief command, and sent General Sandborn with his cavalry in pursuit of the fugitive, with instructions to delay his march, so that General Smith might overtake him. Sandborn struck his rear-guard at Versailles, and ascertained that Price was marching directly on Booneville. Shelby's cavalry quickly enveloped Sandborn, who made a timely retreat, and, falling back a short distance to California, was overtaken there by Smith's cavalry, under Colonel Catherwood, with needed supplies. In the mean time re-enforcements from the Nationals were coming from St. Louis. General Mower had followed Price out of Arkansas, and struck the Mississippi at Cape Girardeau, after a fatiguing march of three hundred miles in the space of eighteen days. His army was so worn, man and beast, that Rosecrans sent steamboats to Cape Girardeau for them, and they were taken to St. Louis, whence the infantry
Mount Airy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ley of East Tennessee, eastward as well as westward of Knoxville, is clustered with the most stirring associations of the Civil War. We passed on our journey from Knoxville, Strawberry Plain, Bull's Gap, Blue Springs, and other places already mentioned as scenes of conflict; and from Greenville to Bristol, on the borders of Virginia, such notable places were many. Over that region and beyond we passed on the night of the 24th and 25th, May, 1866. and at six o'clock in the morning were at Mount Airy, twenty-eight hundred feet above the Richmond basin, and said to be the most lofty point of railway travel in the United States. We descended into the rugged valleys eastward of this Appalachian range, and then ascended the western gentle slope of the Blue Ridge, one of the most beautiful and thoroughly cultivated regions in the world. The ravages of war had not been felt just there. We descended the more precipitous side of that lofty range into the fine high valleys around the upper w
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ell back toward Bull's Gap, at the junction of the Rogersville branch with the main railway. General Burnside had now retired from the command of the Army of the Ohio, which was assumed Dec. 11. by General John G. Foster, his successor in North Carolina. The first event of much importance that occurred after Foster's accession and the affair at Bean's Station, was a fight, Dec. 29. between Mossy Creek and New Market, by the National advance at Knoxville, under General S. D. Sturgis, with ae half-naked, half-starved soldiers, whose terms of service there expired, cheerfully re-enlisted. It was the history of Valley Forge repeated at Strawberry Plain. At about the same time General Robert Vance went over the Smoky Mountain from North Carolina, into East Tennessee, with about four hundred cavalry and two pieces of artillery. It was a most perilous march, over icy roads. Vance left the bulk of his force at the foot of the mountain, and led one hundred and seventy-five men on a rec
Cape Girardeau (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rtaken there by Smith's cavalry, under Colonel Catherwood, with needed supplies. In the mean time re-enforcements from the Nationals were coming from St. Louis. General Mower had followed Price out of Arkansas, and struck the Mississippi at Cape Girardeau, after a fatiguing march of three hundred miles in the space of eighteen days. His army was so worn, man and beast, that Rosecrans sent steamboats to Cape Girardeau for them, and they were taken to St. Louis, whence the infantry were conveyedCape Girardeau for them, and they were taken to St. Louis, whence the infantry were conveyed up the Missouri on steamers, while the cavalry, fifteen hundred strong, under General Winslow. marched to Jefferson City by land. Price was now moving toward Kansas, with a heavy force, in pursuit. The National cavalry, with Pleasanton in immediate command, led in the chase. As the Confederates marched westward they found more sympathizers, and became bolder. Price sent Shelby across the Missouri River at Arrow Rock, to strike a Union force at Glasgow, in Howard County. After a sharp fi
Newtonia (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
onville, the capital of Cass County, for the same purpose. The Kansas troops, with Benteen's brigade, continued the pursuit, followed by Sandborn's cavalry. They drove the fugitives whenever they attempted to make a stand, until they reached Newtonia, in the southwest corner of Missouri. Price was then moving at a panic pace, strewing the line of his march with the wrecks of wagons and other materials of war, broken and burnt. He turned at Newtonia and offered battle. October 28. He was gNewtonia and offered battle. October 28. He was gaining decided advantages, when Sandborn, who had marched one hundred and two miles in thirty-six hours, came up and assisted in defeating him. Price again fled, and made his way into Western Arkansas, followed by Curtis, who found Nov. 14. Colonel La Rue, who was occupying Fayetteville, with the First Arkansas (Union) Cavalry, closely besieged by an overwhelming force. Colonel Brooks had surrounded the post with two thousand Confederates, whom La Rue easily kept at bay until Fagan's division
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
he wearied troopers were falling into needed slumber, they were called to action by the summons of a two-gun battery that opened upon them, followed by a sharp charge. The assailants were quickly repulsed, but it being evident that little repose could be obtained there, Kilpatrick's column moved on, crossed the Chickahominy, and pushed for the Pamunkey. There were no means at hand for passing over that stream, so the raiders moved across the Richmond and York River railway, not far from White House, where they met a force coming up from New Kent Court-House, which General Butler had sent to the aid of Kilpatrick. These consisted of a brigade of colored infantry, 2,000 strong, under Colonel Dunkin, 800 cavalry, under Colonel Spear, and Belger's Rhode Island Battery. Thus far Kilpatrick had been pretty hotly pursued by the Confederates, with whom he skirmished frequently, but now the chase was at an end. He had lost about one hundred and fifty men during the raid, and gained five h
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
en ascending the Mississippi with about six thousand troops, infantry and cavalry, destined to re-enforce Sherman in Northern Georgia, to be halted there, and, with his command, be sent to St. Louis to re-enforce Rosecrans. This strengthening of theturgis's loss was about one hundred. At the same time, Wheeler, with about twelve hundred mounted men, had come up from Georgia, and was boldly operating between Knoxville and Chattanooga, his most notable achievement being an attack Dec. 28. upon fruitfulness under the hand of intelligent and industrious cultivators. It presented a great contrast to the region in Georgia between Dalton and Atlanta, which was yet in the desolate state in which Sherman and Johnston had left it. At Knoxvil was placed in command of it; and General Kilpatrick was assigned to the command of the cavalry of Sherman's army in Northern Georgia. General Pleasanton was ordered to report to General Rosecrans, in Missouri, where we have just observed him engaged
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
recipitous side of that lofty range into the fine high valleys around the upper waters of the James River, and arrived at Lynchburg in the evening, whence we traveled the next day, by way of Charlottlty and starvation in the filthy Libby Prison, and more horribly .on bleak Belle Isle, in the James River, in front of Richmond — circumstances which we shall consider hereafter. Kilpatrick left camuthor immediately after the evacuation of Richmond, in April, 1865, from the high bank of the James River, near the Tredegar works. Looking across that stream southward. Bradley T. Johnson. Theore to the right, by way of Frederickshall, and through Louisa and Goochland Counties, to the James River, above Richmond, where they intended to destroy as much of the James River canal — as possiblved southward, led by a negro guide, who, ignorantly or treacherously, took the column to the James River, near Goochland Court-House, instead of to a fording place nearer Richmond. The exasperated
Greenville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Finally, early in September, when he was at Greenville, with his thin brigade lying near, his force the house of Mrs. Catherine D. Williams, in Greenville, which was surrounded by the Union troops, aentioned (Messrs. Dreer and Greble), visited Greenville and other places in the great Valley of Eastn East Tennessee, we journeyed by railway to Greenville, near which occurred many events. illustrat, and was consequently prosperous. While in Greenville we were shown his family Bible, in which, ininning of his useful pursuit in that shop at Greenville, and his official life and its termination if the Union officers and soldiers. While at Greenville, a greater portion of the writer's time was r Colonel Columbus Wilcox, made their way to Greenville, while Morgan's brigade was lying a short did him at this time, when his command entered Greenville on the withdrawal of Gillem, they brought a dy mentioned as scenes of conflict; and from Greenville to Bristol, on the borders of Virginia, such[3 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...