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Russellville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
eanwhile General Gillem discovered a Confederate force in his rear, at Morristown, when he attacked them suddenly, Oct. 28. routed them, and inflicted upon them a loss of four hundred men and four guns. Soon after this Breckinridge moved cautiously forward, and on a very dark night Nov. 12, 13. fell suddenly upon Gillem, at Bull's Gap, charged gallantly up a steep, half-wooded hill in the gloom, drove the Nationals from their intrenchments, and utterly routed them. Gillem fell back to Russellville, where he was again attacked and routed, and after a loss of his battery, train, nearly all of his small-arms, thrown away by his soldiers in their flight, and two hundred and twenty men, he fled to the shelter of the intrenchments at Knoxville. Breckinridge pursued him as far as Strawberry Plain, and for awhile held the country eastward of that point in subjection to the Confederates. Other military movements in that mountain region were so intimately connected with, and auxiliary to
Cleveland, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ia, to visit the theater of the simultaneous campaign against Richmond. Having visited the principal places of conflict between Sherman and Johnston on our way to Atlanta from Chattanooga, we now journeyed back without halting until we reached Cleveland, the place of junction of the railways leading into the valley from Chattanooga and Dalton. There, at a little cottage-like inn, embowered in trees, and then sweetly perfumed by its garden of roses, we spent a night and part of a day, a portionences around it were earth-works for cannon and the shelter of troops; and upon a ridge overlooking the railway station was the fine brick mansion of Mr. Raht, which General Howard used as Headquarters when he was there with his corps. From Cleveland we journeyed to Knoxville by railway, seeing the evidences of the recent strife everywhere along the line of its track. At Charleston, where the railway crosses the Hiawassee, we saw strong earth-works, and a block-house on the margin of that
Lamine (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
helby across the Missouri River at Arrow Rock, to strike a Union force at Glasgow, in Howard County. After a sharp fight for several hours, he captured the place, with its defenders, under Colonel Harding, composed of a part of his Forty-third Missouri, and small detachments of the Ninth Missouri militia and Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry. This temerity would have been punished by a serious, if not fatal, blow upon Price's main body, had not the pursuing General Smith been detained at the Lamine River, on account of the destruction of the railway bridge at the crossing on his route. There he was overtaken by General Mower, when, with a few days' provisions, and in light marching order, he pushed on directly westward, toward Warrensburg, while Pleasanton, with his cavalry, including those under Winslow, was sweeping over the country northward to the Missouri River, in the direction of Lexington, which Price's advance reached on the 20th of October. Blunt, who had come out of Kansas, h
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Opposition party as were willing to follow them, faded away. Grant was then closely besieging Petersburg and Richmond; Atlanta had been captured by the Nationals, and Sherman, the conqueror, was on his march toward the sea; and everywhere eastwardEastern Kentucky and in East Tennessee, before we proceed to a consideration of the great campaigns against Richmond and Atlanta which Lieutenant-General Grant organized after his appointment to the chief command of the Armies of the Republic. Ons campaign against Richmond. Having visited the principal places of conflict between Sherman and Johnston on our way to Atlanta from Chattanooga, we now journeyed back without halting until we reached Cleveland, the place of junction of the railwayd of intelligent and industrious cultivators. It presented a great contrast to the region in Georgia between Dalton and Atlanta, which was yet in the desolate state in which Sherman and Johnston had left it. At Knoxville we were the guests of Go
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s re-enforced, and the Confederates retreated southward. This bold movement was followed by others in that section of the State. In July about four hundred colored troops, led by Colonel W. S. Brooks, went up the country a short distance from Helena, when they were attacked July 26. by a heavier force under General Dobbins. Fortunately, Major Carmichael was then passing down the Mississippi on a steamer, with one hundred and fifty of the Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry, and hearing the firing, s, he dashed through the Confederate lines, joined the colored troops, and assisted them in repulsing their assailants. Colonel Brooks was killed, and fifty of his men were slain or wounded. The foe had lost more. The Union troops fell back to Helena, followed some distance by Dobbins. At about the same time fifteen hundred Confederates surprised July 27, 1864. an outpost of Fort Smith, on the border of the Indian country, which was held by two hundred of the Fifth Kansas, under Captain Mef
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ton, and Halleck telegraphed to Cairo, directing A. J. Smith, then ascending the Mississippi with about six thousand troops, infantry and cavalry, destined to re-enforce Sherman in Northern Georgia, to be halted there, and, with his command, be sent to St. Louis to re-enforce Rosecrans. This strengthening of the troops in Missouri was timely, for Price soon crossed the Arkansas River, Sept. 21. joined Shelby, and, with nearly twenty thousand men, entered Southeastern Missouri between the Big Black and St. Francis rivers, and pushed on to Pilot Knob, more than half way to St. Louis from the Arkansas border, almost without a show of opposition. Rosecrans had only about six thousand five hundred mounted men in his Department when this formidable invasion began, and these were scattered — over a country four hundred miles in length and three hundred in breadth, with only a partially organized infantry force and dismounted men, guarding from the swarming guerrillas the greater depots,
Arkansas County (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
everywhere showed, by their boldness and activity, a determination to repossess the State, if possible. Their cavalry roamed at will over all the region below the Arkansas, after Steele retreated to Little Rock, plundering and overawing the Unionists. Nor did they confine themselves to that region. Late in June 1864. Shelby, with a considerable body of Confederate cavalry, dashed across the Arkansas eastward of Little Rock, and pushed on to the White River, on the eastern border of Arkansas County, where they were attacked and thrown back, in the vicinity of St. Charles, by four regiments under General Carr, with a loss of about four hundred men, of whom two hundred were made prisoners. Carr's loss was about two hundred. Shelby was speedily re-enforced by Marmaduke, when Carr was pushed northward to Clarendon, when he, in turn, was re-enforced, and the Confederates retreated southward. This bold movement was followed by others in that section of the State. In July about fou
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
hmond basin, and said to be the most lofty point of railway travel in the United States. We descended into the rugged valleys eastward of this Appalachian range, and then ascended the western gentle slope of the Blue Ridge, one of the most beautiful and thoroughly cultivated regions in the world. The ravages of war had not been felt just there. We descended the more precipitous side of that lofty range into the fine high valleys around the upper waters of the James River, and arrived at Lynchburg in the evening, whence we traveled the next day, by way of Charlottesville and Gordonsville, to Richmond, See page 485, volume II. the track of the more direct route of railway being yet in ruins. Morgan's raid into Kentucky, though disastrous to his immediate command, accomplished its object in a degree, for it drew Burbridge, as we have seen, away from the combined movement upon Southwestern Virginia, and gave the Confederates time to strengthen their forces in that direction, espe
Missouri (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
on of the State were concentrated at the capital, Jefferson City, by General Brown, who was re-enforced by General Fisk with all available troops north of the Missouri River. The Union citizens in that region cordially co-operated with the military, and before Price turned his face in that direction, the capital was well fortifien in immediate command, led in the chase. As the Confederates marched westward they found more sympathizers, and became bolder. Price sent Shelby across the Missouri River at Arrow Rock, to strike a Union force at Glasgow, in Howard County. After a sharp fight for several hours, he captured the place, with its defenders, under ed on directly westward, toward Warrensburg, while Pleasanton, with his cavalry, including those under Winslow, was sweeping over the country northward to the Missouri River, in the direction of Lexington, which Price's advance reached on the 20th of October. Blunt, who had come out of Kansas, had been driven back to Independence
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
advance of the Army of the Potomac. Arkansas overrun by the Confederates, 274. decline ofkansas River, by which two-thirds of the State of Arkansas was given up to the Confederates, had a sympathy with the slave-holding Oligarchy of Arkansas made the army under his command a feeble insts at Richmond. The condition of affairs in Arkansas was favorable to a long-contemplated scheme oyes, and the movements of the Confederates in Arkansas were under the vigilant scrutiny of General What General Shelby was at Batesville, in Northern Arkansas, waiting for Price to join him, when theuis. General Mower had followed Price out of Arkansas, and struck the Mississippi at Cape Girardeaumportance of cutting off Price's retreat into Arkansas, ordered Pleasanton (by telegraph) to move di. He fled rapidly southward, and passed into Arkansas, not, however, without receiving some parting. Price again fled, and made his way into Western Arkansas, followed by Curtis, who found Nov. 14.
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