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Hazel Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
into Southwestern Virginia in co-operation with Crook and Averill, who were to march up the Kanawha, in the direction of the Blue Ridge. Morgan always managed to live off the country he was in; so now he sent men ahead to seize fresh horses from friends or foes, and by that means his followers were soon so well mounted that they were enabled to sweep rapidly through the eastern counties of Kentucky, from Johnson to Harrison, by way of Paintville on the west fork of the Big Sandy, through Hazel Green, Owensville, and Mount Sterling, to Paris and Cynthiana, in the richest part of the commonwealth, and to give to that region a new claim to the title of the dark and bloody ground. He captured Mount Sterling, Paris, Cynthiana, and Williamstown, almost without resistance; and burnt railway trains, stations, and bridges, tore up tracks, and plundered without fear, for the troops in the path of his desolation were too few or feeble to check him. His men were divided into raiding parties, an
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
journey from Greenville to Richmond, 286. Knoxville threatened by Breckinridge Richmond threatek and New Market, by the National advance at Knoxville, under General S. D. Sturgis, with an estimaom Georgia, and was boldly operating between Knoxville and Chattanooga, his most notable achievemenred to be determined to repossess himself of Knoxville; but his movement was only a mask, behind whr places, between the Tennessee crossing and Knoxville. That region is extremely fertile, and was nch patriot, General E. Kirby Smith, when in Knoxville, stabled a pair of mules in Dr. Brownlow's lef's death. She was then safe from harm, in Knoxville. Coincident with the testimony of the abot Tennessee, eastward as well as westward of Knoxville, is clustered with the most stirring associaon moved into East Tennessee, and threatened Knoxville. Meanwhile General Gillem discovered a Conf fled to the shelter of the intrenchments at Knoxville. Breckinridge pursued him as far as Strawbe[8 more...]
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ce. Second, to hammer continuously against the armed force of the enemy and his resources, until by mere attrition, if in no other way, there should be nothing left to him but an equal submission with the loyal section of our common country to the Constitution and laws of the land. Grant felt encouraged to work in accordance with these views, for the loyal people everywhere evinced entire confidence in him, and a disposition to furnish him with all necessary materials for making a vigorous and decisive campaign. Volunteering was rapidly increasing; and on the 21st of April 1864. the Governors of the younger States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin, tendered to the President the services. of one hundred thousand men, for one hundred days, without requiring any bounty to be paid or the service charged or credited on any draft. This patriotic offer was accepted, and the Secretary of War was directed April 23. to carry the proposition of the Governors into effect.
Morristown, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
bingdon, in Washington County, Virginia, to destroy them. He was met by a heavy force under Breckinridge, and after a sharp conflict Oct. 2, 1864. was thrown back, with a loss of about three hundred and fifty men. His ammunition was running low, so he retreated that night, leaving his wounded to the care of his foe. Encouraged by this success, Breckinridge soon moved into East Tennessee, and threatened Knoxville. Meanwhile General Gillem discovered a Confederate force in his rear, at Morristown, when he attacked them suddenly, Oct. 28. routed them, and inflicted upon them a loss of four hundred men and four guns. Soon after this Breckinridge moved cautiously forward, and on a very dark night Nov. 12, 13. fell suddenly upon Gillem, at Bull's Gap, charged gallantly up a steep, half-wooded hill in the gloom, drove the Nationals from their intrenchments, and utterly routed them. Gillem fell back to Russellville, where he was again attacked and routed, and after a loss of his batt
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
f City Point, at the junction of the Appomattox River with the James, whence he might operate, either against Richmond directly, or its communications, or effect a junction with the Army of the Potomac marching down from the North, as circumstances might require. Another force was organized for the purpose of menacing the westward communications with Richmond. This force was to be composed of the army of General Franz Sigel, then engaged in protecting Western Virginia and the frontiers of Maryland and Pennsylvania. He was to form his army into two columns, one of them, about ten thousand strong, under General Crook, to march up from the Kanawha region and operate against the Virginia and East Tennessee railway, and the other, about seven thousand strong,. under Sigel, in person, to go up the Shenandoah Valley as far as possible, and, by thus menacing Lee's westward lines of supply, compel him to send detachments for their protection, and thereby weaken his forces opposed to the Army
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
obtained, he arrested the Belgian consul at St. Louis, who was the State commander of these disloyshed on to Pilot Knob, more than half way to St. Louis from the Arkansas border, almost without a sield, Pilot Knob, Jefferson City, Rolla, and St. Louis, and the railway bridges. These were concenthat leader move, that when it was seen that St. Louis was probably his first and chief objective, time to concentrate a considerable force at St. Louis. For a week the Confederate element seemed showed circumspection, as troops poured into St. Louis. General A. J. Smith's infantry, between fook post at Richwood's, within forty miles of St. Louis, when, after remaining a day or two, and evircements from the Nationals were coming from St. Louis. General Mower had followed Price out of Are Girardeau for them, and they were taken to St. Louis, whence the infantry were conveyed up the Mintages they had been gaining. Rosecrans, at St. Louis, not fully comprehending the importance of c[3 more...]
Mount Sterling, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rough the eastern counties of Kentucky, from Johnson to Harrison, by way of Paintville on the west fork of the Big Sandy, through Hazel Green, Owensville, and Mount Sterling, to Paris and Cynthiana, in the richest part of the commonwealth, and to give to that region a new claim to the title of the dark and bloody ground. He captured Mount Sterling, Paris, Cynthiana, and Williamstown, almost without resistance; and burnt railway trains, stations, and bridges, tore up tracks, and plundered without fear, for the troops in the path of his desolation were too few or feeble to check him. His men were divided into raiding parties, and one of these, three hundreds told of Morgan's passage of the mountains, he started promptly in pursuit, and, by a forced march of ninety miles, surprised him by a stout blow June 9. at Mount Sterling, which sent him bounding forward. With a part of his force the guerrilla pushed into Lexington, and entering it just past midnight, burned the railway statio
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rancis rivers, and pushed on to Pilot Knob, more than half way to St. Louis from the Arkansas border, almost without a show of opposition. Rosecrans had only about six thousand five hundred mounted men in his Department when this formidable invasion began, and these were scattered — over a country four hundred miles in length and three hundred in breadth, with only a partially organized infantry force and dismounted men, guarding from the swarming guerrillas the greater depots, such as Springfield, Pilot Knob, Jefferson City, Rolla, and St. Louis, and the railway bridges. These were concentrated as quickly as possible after ascertaining the route and destination of Price, yet so swiftly did that leader move, that when it was seen that St. Louis was probably his first and chief objective, only a single brigade was at Pilot Knob (which is connected with the former place by a railway) to confront him. This was commanded by General Hugh S. Ewing, The brigade was composed of the For
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
were soon so well mounted that they were enabled to sweep rapidly through the eastern counties of Kentucky, from Johnson to Harrison, by way of Paintville on the west fork of the Big Sandy, through Hazel Green, Owensville, and Mount Sterling, to Paris and Cynthiana, in the richest part of the commonwealth, and to give to that region a new claim to the title of the dark and bloody ground. He captured Mount Sterling, Paris, Cynthiana, and Williamstown, almost without resistance; and burnt railwParis, Cynthiana, and Williamstown, almost without resistance; and burnt railway trains, stations, and bridges, tore up tracks, and plundered without fear, for the troops in the path of his desolation were too few or feeble to check him. His men were divided into raiding parties, and one of these, three hundred strong, led by Colonel Giltner, actually pushed General Hobson, with twelve hundred well-armed men, into a bend of the Licking River, in Nicholas County, and captured him and his troops. When General Burbridge was told of Morgan's passage of the mountains, he s
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
f nearly six thousand Confederates, under the notorious guerrilla chief, J. H. Morgan, and Martin Armstrong. The Confederates were vanquished, with a loss never reported, but estimated at full three hundred men. Sturgis's loss was about one hundred. At the same time, Wheeler, with about twelve hundred mounted men, had come up from Georgia, and was boldly operating between Knoxville and Chattanooga, his most notable achievement being an attack Dec. 28. upon a National supply-train, near Charlestown, on the Hiawassee, which was guarded by only one hundred men, under Colonel Siebert. Of course, Wheeler easily captured the train, but it was not so easy to hold it, for, immediately after the seizure, Colonel Long came up to Siebert's assistance, with one hundred and fifty of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry and Colonel Laibold's Second Missouri Infantry. These, with Siebert's men, retook the train, and drove Wheeler back, with a loss of forty-one killed and wounded and one hundred and twenty-t
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