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Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
avoid a blow on his flank, resumed his march toward Richmond, his objective being the passage of the Pamunkey, one of the affluents of the York, formed by the junction of the North and South Anna rivers, which would force Lee to abandon the line of those streams, and give to the Army of the Potomac an admirable water base of supplies, at White House. The chief base of the army, while it was at Spottsylvania Court-House, was at Fredericksburg; while it was on the North Anna that base was Port Royal, on the Rappahannock. Sheridan, who, as we have seen, See page 313. had just returned May 25, 1864. to the army after his great raid toward Richmond and across the head of the Peninsula, now led the flanking column with two divisions of cavalry, immediately followed by Wright's corps, leading Warren's and Burnside's. Hancock's remained on the North Anna until morning, May 27. to cover the rear, at which time the head of the column, after y a march of more than twenty miles, was ap
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. Movements of the Army of the James, 317. seizure of City Point and its vicinity, 318. operations in Southeastern Virginia, 319. Confederate troops called from Charleston to the defense of Petersburg and Richmond, 320. events between Petersburg and Richmond, 321, 322. Union cavalry raid under General Kautz, 323. advance of the Army of the Potomac from Spottsylvania Court House, 324. the armies on the North Anna in a race for Richmond, 3 such victories, for strength was quickly imparted to both posts. When the movement of Butler and the arrival of Gillmore with troops from Charleston harbor was first known to the Confederates at Richmond, Beauregard was ordered to hasten from Charleston to the latter place, with all possible dispatch, with the troops under his command there, others drawn from Georgia and Florida, and such as he might gather in his passage through North Carolina. He instantly obeyed, and when General Kautz str
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
les of Richmond, in a straight line, and only about eight from Petersburg. At sunset on the 4th, you were threatening the enemy's capital from West Point and White House, within thirty miles on its eastern side. Within twenty-four hours, at sunset on the 5th of May, by a march of 130 miles, you transported 35,000 men-their luggch of twenty-five miles, He had been erroneously directed to march to New Castle, instead of New Cool Arbor, and he had, by that means, made the journey from White House, more than ten miles further than was necessary. he was met by an order to form on the right of. the Sixth Corps, General Martindale commanded Smith's right;etrace his steps to Trevilian's, where he fought a sanguinary battle, and then withdrew. He swept around, by Spottsylvania Court-House and Guiney's Station, to White House, and rejoined Grant's army, having lost during his raid over seven hundred men, and captured nearly four hundred. He inflicted a loss of men upon the Confedera
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
mattox into Petersburg, and, if possible, capture that place. But that evening news came from Washington that Lee, vanquished by Meade, was in full retreat on Richmond. If so, he might quickly and h disencumbered of its twenty thousand sick and wounded men, who were taken to the hospitals at Washington and elsewhere, and-of about eight thousand prisoners who had been sent to the rear. At the sah two divisions of cavalry, to more effectually destroy the railways in Lee's rear, and render Washington more secure. Grant's determination to transfer his army to the south side of the James River-startled the authorities at Washington with fears that Lee might suddenly turn back and seize that city. Grant had no fears on that account. He knew that the country between Lee's shattered army and Washington was thoroughly exhausted by the troops that had just passed over it; and had Lee attempted such a movement, Grant could have sent troops from the James, by way of the Potomac, for the pr
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
r as the old lines of McClellan For an account of the operations of McClellan between Fortress Monroe and Williamsburg, see Chapters. XIV. and XV., volume II. The route from Hampton; the fortifications at Big Bethel, and in the vicinity of Yorktown and Williamsburg, are indicated in the little map on this page. at Yorktown and Gloucester Point; and so successful was the stratagem, that the Confederates were satisfied that Butler was about to move on Richmond in the pathway trodden by McCleYorktown and Gloucester Point; and so successful was the stratagem, that the Confederates were satisfied that Butler was about to move on Richmond in the pathway trodden by McClellan two years before, See chapters XIV., XV., and XVI., volume II. The map on the opposite page, omitted by accident when that record was printed, will not only give the reader an idea of the entire region of stirring operations in Southeastern Virginia at that time, but may be usefully consulted when studying the great and decisive campaign we are now considering. and they made preparations accordingly. They were quickly undeceived, but not until it was too late to prevent the mischief wr
Point Richmond (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
were remanded to slavery. no other raid in the rear of the Confederates was undertaken for several months after the return of this one. It was too dangerous and expensive a service, under the circumstances, to be made profitable. and now, after a sanguinary struggle for two months, both armies were willing to have a little repose, and there was a lull in the active operations of the campaign, excepting what pertained to intrenching. The Union Army thus investing Petersburg, at which Point Richmond, Twenty miles distant, was best defended, had lost, within eight or nine weeks, nearly seventy thousand men. Re-enforcements had kept up its numbers, but not the Pontoon bridge at Deep Bottom. this shows the appearance of the pontoon bridge at Deep Bottom, with Butler's little dispatch-steamer Grey Hound, lying just above it. quality of its materials. Many veterans remained; but a vast portion of the Army was composed, if not of entirely raw troops, of those who had been little di
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
mattox River, about ten miles from its mouth at City Point. That river is navigable to Petersburg for vessels of one hundred tons burden; but larger ones ascend only to Port Walthall, six miles below it, near the high eminence on the north side, known as Point of Rocks. Through Petersburg passed the railway that connected Richmond with the Carolinas. Another, called the Southside road, extended westward to Lynchburg; another, running in a southeasterly direction, connected Petersburg and Norfolk, and a short one also connected Petersburg with. City Point. the possession of which would be of vast importance as a point d'appui, or fixed place for the forming of troops for chief operations against Richmond. Butler's line of works, erected under the direction of General Weitzel, were then perfected, and were not surpassed, in completeness Line of defense at Bermuda hundred. this shows a portion of the line of works constructed by General Weitzel. First, there was a strong line o
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ders to advance. His effective force was about forty thousand men, and was composed chiefly of the Eighteenth Army Corps, commanded by General W. F. Smith, and the Tenth Army Corps, which had lately been ordered from South Carolina, led by General Gillmore, who arrived at Fortress Monroe on the 3d of May. Butler's first care was to mislead the Confederates concerning his intentions. For that purpose he first sent May 1. Henry's brigade of New York troops to West Point, at the head of York River, to begin the construction of wharves, Confederate defenses between Hampton and Williamsburg. while cavalry made a demonstration in the direction of Richmond. He also sent the bulk of his army in that direction as far as the old lines of McClellan For an account of the operations of McClellan between Fortress Monroe and Williamsburg, see Chapters. XIV. and XV., volume II. The route from Hampton; the fortifications at Big Bethel, and in the vicinity of Yorktown and Williamsburg, ar
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
at Richmond, Beauregard was ordered to hasten from Charleston to the latter place, with all possible dispatch, with the troops under his command there, others drawn from Georgia and Florida, and such as he might gather in his passage through North Carolina. He instantly obeyed, and when General Kautz struck the Weldon road, as we have seen, he found these re-enforcements for Lee passing over it. A large portion of them were left south of that cutting, D. H. Hill, with 8,000 troops, had passStation; and then, with a part of his command he crossed to the Southside railway at White and Black Station, while the remainder went on to the junction of the Danville and Southside roads. All now turned eastward, moving down far toward the North Carolina line, crossing the Weldon road and destroying it at Jarratt's Station, south of the scene of their devastations a few days before, and passing by Prince George's Court-House, returned to City Point on the 17th. Kautz had seriously damaged th
Ned Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 12
rk River, to begin the construction of wharves, Confederate defenses between Hampton and Williamsburg. while cavalry made a demonstration in the direction of Richmroe and Williamsburg, see Chapters. XIV. and XV., volume II. The route from Hampton; the fortifications at Big Bethel, and in the vicinity of Yorktown and William far from the Tolopatomoy Creek, they encountered and vanquished cavalry under Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee. Both parties were dismounted and fought desperately. The Coe same time; and on the extreme right, Wilson's cavalry had a sharp fight with Hampton's, without any decisive results. But Warren's corps was too extended to allow on the railway. At Trevilian's he encountered and routed some horsemen under Hampton, and then destroyed the road almost to Louisa Court-House, where he was attackd to find in the possession of the Nationals. On the contrary, the cavalry of Hampton, and infantry under Mahone and Finnegan were there in great strength. In atte
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