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Peter A. Porter (search for this): chapter 12
The whole army, as if controlled by a single will, refused to stir! And so, at one o'clock in the afternoon, the battle of Cool Arbor was ended in a dreadful loss of life to the Nationals, but of nothing else, for they held their position firmly, with all their munitions of war. The National loss in this engagement, and in the immediate vicinity of Cool Arbor, was reported at 18,158, of whom 1,705 were killed, 9,042 wounded, and 2,406 were missing. Among the killed were Acting Brigadier-Generals Peter A. Porter, Lewis O. Morris, and F. F. Weed, of the New York troops. Other prominent officers were severely wounded, among them General O. P. Tyler. The Confederates lost General Doles. Lawrence M. Keit, one of the most active of the South Carolina conspirators in Congress in 1861, had been killed the day, before. Grant now resolved to transfer his army to the south side of the James River, and by this grand flank movement, to cut off the chief sources of supplies of men View
F. C. Barlow (search for this): chapter 12
vanced to the attack. On the right it was made by the divisions of Barlow and Gibbon, of Hancock's corps, that of Birney supporting. Barlow Barlow drove the Confederates from a strong position in a sunken road, in front of their works, captured several hundred prisoners, a battle-flag, ansent them back in confusion. Battle of Cool Arbor. But, before Barlow's second line reached the front, the Confederates rallied in stronger force, and retook the position from which they had been pushed. Barlow was driven back about fifty yards, when he so speedily covered his e dislodged. Gibbon, who charged at the same time, at the right of Barlow, was checked by a marsh of the Chickahominy, which partly separatede that ensued continued until night, with great slaughter, in which Barlow's division suffered most severely. Crawford was sent to Burnside'sands, and in rapid succession struck the flanks of the divisions of Barlow, Mott, and Gibbon, rolling them up and driving them back with heavy
Robert M. West (search for this): chapter 12
ith three thousand cavalry, moved out from Suffolk, forced a passage over the Blackwater River, and, pushing rapidly westward, struck the Weldon railway at Stony Creek, some distance south of Petersburg, and burned the bridge there; while Colonel Robert M. West, with about eighteen hundred cavalry (mostly colored men), advanced from Williamsburg up the north bank of the James River, keeping parallel with the great flotilla of war vessels and transports on its bosom. This expedition, and the advexploded by means of a string extending to the shore, which, when pulled, caused an apparatus like that of a gun to explode a percussion cap. by which twenty of its officers and crew were killed, and forty-eight were wounded. In the mean time Colonel West, with his cavalry, had made his way across the Chickahominy to the shore of the James at Harrison's Landing, and been taken thence, on transports, to Bermuda Hundred. A quick and vigorous movement upon Petersburg and Richmond at that time m
Fitz-Hugh Lee (search for this): chapter 12
capture Petersburg, 335. attack on the Petersburg lines, 336. operations against Petersburg, 337. seizure of the Weldon railway, 338. condition of the Army of the Potomac, 339. Butler secures a lodgment at Deep Bottom, 340. While Meade and Lee were struggling in the vicinity of the Rapid Anna, General Butler, then in command of the Army of the James, was co-operating with the Army of the Potomac in accordance with a plan which he had proposed to the General-in-Chief, and which that offiy, 1864. transports, sent up from Hampton Roads, conveyed Butler's army around to the James River, and by dawn the next morning, artillery and infantry, to the number of thirty-five thousand men, accompanied by a squadron of war vessels, under Admiral Lee, were rapidly ascending that stream for the purpose of seizing City Point. The transports were preceded by three army gun-boats, under the command of General Charles R. Graham, formerly of the navy. The remainder of the naval force consist
, artillery and infantry, to the number of thirty-five thousand men, accompanied by a squadron of war vessels, under Admiral Lee, were rapidly ascending that stream for the purpose of seizing City Point. The transports were preceded by three army gun-boats, under the command of General Charles R. Graham, formerly of the navy. The remainder of the naval force consisted of four monitors, the iron-clad Atlanta, and ten gun-boats, commanded by Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, whose flag-ship was the Malvern, formerly a blockade-runner. At the same time General A. V. Kautz, with three thousand cavalry, moved out from Suffolk, forced a passage over the Blackwater River, and, pushing rapidly westward, struck the Weldon railway at Stony Creek, some distance south of Petersburg, and burned the bridge there; while Colonel Robert M. West, with about eighteen hundred cavalry (mostly colored men), advanced from Williamsburg up the north bank of the James River, keeping parallel with the great flotilla
David A. Russell (search for this): chapter 12
n, General Smith came up, after a march of twenty-five miles, He had been erroneously directed to march to New Castle, instead of New Cool Arbor, and he had, by that means, made the journey from White House, more than ten miles further than was necessary. he was met by an order to form on the right of. the Sixth Corps, General Martindale commanded Smith's right; General W. H. Brooks his center, and General Devens, his left. General Rickets commanded the right of the Sixths Corps, General Russell the center, and General Neill the left. then in front of Cool Arbor, on the road leading to Gaines's Mill, and co-operate in an immediate attack upon the Confederates. These were now in heavy force and in. battle order, in that vicinity, for when Lee discovered the withdrawal of the Sixth Corps from Grant's right, he suspected its destination, and had sent the whole of Longstreet's corps to strengthen his own right, which was then partially concealed by thick woods. Between the two
George H. Stuart (search for this): chapter 12
General's quarters. It was very neatly built of small hewn logs, excepting the front, which was of planed pine timber, the bark left on the edges, and the whole well chinked with cement. It had two wings, making the whole quite spacious. A building at the left of it, was occupied by General Rawlins, Grants' chief of staff; and one on the right was the quarters of General Barnard, the engineer-in-chief. Grant's house was presented by the Lieutenant-General, at the close of the war, to George H. Stuart, President of the U. S. Christian Commission, who caused it to be taken to Philadelphia. By permission of the City authorities he re-erected it in Fairmount Par, where it yet (1868) remains. elevated grounds of Dr. Eppes, near the junction of the Appomatox and the James, he established his Headquarters. When Grant determined to throw Meade's army to the south side of the James, he hastened to Butler's Headquarters for the purpose of arranging a plan of co-operation from Bermuda Hund
John G. Foster (search for this): chapter 12
onals, and strong works were cast up along the front of the whole Confederate line, from the Weldon road to the region of the Chickahominy. on the night of the 20th of June, Butler, by one of his prompt movements, had thrown the brigade of General Foster across the James River at Deep Bottom, where he formed an intrenched Camp; and this post, within ten miles of Richmond, was immediately connected with the Army at Bermuda hundred by a pontoon bridge, represented in the engraving on the preceding page. There Smith's (Eighteenth) corps was transferred to Bermuda hundred, and thenceforth served with the Army of the James a greater part of the time during the siege. The lodgment of Foster, and the laying of the pontoon bridge at Deep Bottom, provided a way for Grant to move heavy masses quickly to the north side of the James, if desired. This advantage was perceived by Lee, who met it by laying a similar bridge across the River at Drewry's Bluff, by which he could make countervailing
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 12
e, where no formidable opposition appeared, for Lee was engaged in holding the more important passaed and vanquished cavalry under Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee. Both parties were dismounted and fought deson's cavalry. This movement quickly developed Lee's position, which was in front of the Chickahomment, and prepared to cross the Chickahominy on Lee's right, not far from Cool Arbor, See note 2oon of the 31st, after a sharp contest with Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry and Clingman's infantry; and towadivisions of the Ninth to bear upon the left of Lee's line. These were hotly engaged, and would dory, to more effectually destroy the railways in Lee's rear, and render Washington more secure. Gthat account. He knew that the country between Lee's shattered army and Washington was thoroughly e assailants reposed, while nearly the whole of Lee's Army was crossing the James to the south fronst engineering skill (and none was better) that Lee could command. This change compelled Grant to [33 more...]
David D. Birney (search for this): chapter 12
d carried at six o'clock in the evening by the brigades of Pierce and Eagan, of Birney's division. They lost one hundred and fifty men, and captured thirty of the ga it was made by the divisions of Barlow and Gibbon, of Hancock's corps, that of Birney supporting. Barlow drove the Confederates from a strong position in a sunken reived orders from Grant to hasten to the assistance of Smith. The divisions of Birney and Gibbon were then in advance, and these were pushed forward to Smith's posithe National lines, but at a serious cost to the Corps of Hancock and Burnside. Birney, of the former, stormed and carried the ridge on its front. Burnside could makisabled by the breaking out afresh of his wound received at Gettysburg, and General Birney was in temporary command of the Second Corps. and Wright were moved June 2ng the movements of the Nationals, suddenly projected itself between Wright and Birney's commands, and in rapid succession struck the flanks of the divisions of Barlo
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