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sions, commanded by Generals N. J. Jackson, J. W. Geary, and W. T. Ward. General Kilpatrick commanded the cavalry, consisting of one division. Sherman's entire force numbered sixty thousand infantry and artillery, and five thousand five hundred cavalry. On the 14th of November, as we have observed, Sherman's troops, destined for the great march, were grouped around Atlanta. Their last channel of. communication with the Government and the loyal people of the North was closed, when, on the 11th, the commander-in-chief cut the telegraph wire that connected Atlanta with Washington City. Then that army became an isolated moving column, in the heart of the enemy's country. It moved on the morning of the 14th, Howard's wing marching by way of Macdonough for Gordon, on the railway east of Macon, and Slocum's by the town of Decatur, for Madison and Milledgeville. Then, by Sherman's order, and under the direction of Captain O. M. Poe, chief engineer, the entire city of Atlanta (which, ne
t, yet he deemed communication with the fleet of vital importance, and desired the possession of the Ogeechee as a proper avenue of future supply for his. troops, from the sea. He therefore ordered Kilpatrick to cross the Ogeechee on a pontoon bridge, reconnoiter Fort McAllister, that commanded it below the railway, and proceeding to Sunbury, open communication with the fleet. Howard had already sent a scout (Captain Duncan) in a canoe down the Ogeechee for the same purpose. Finally, on the 13th, December, 1864. Sherman ordered General Hazen to carry Fort McAllister by assault with his second division of the Fifteenth Corps. That active officer at once crossed the Ogeechee at King's Bridge, and by one o'clock on that day his force was deployed in front of Fort McAllister, a strong inclosed redoubt, garrisoned by two hundred men, under Major Anderson, artillery and infantry, and having one mortar and twenty-three guns en barbette. At about this time Sherman and Howard reached Che
North was closed, when, on the 11th, the commander-in-chief cut the telegraph wire that connected Atlanta with Washington City. Then that army became an isolated moving column, in the heart of the enemy's country. It moved on the morning of the 14th, Howard's wing marching by way of Macdonough for Gordon, on the railway east of Macon, and Slocum's by the town of Decatur, for Madison and Milledgeville. Then, by Sherman's order, and under the direction of Captain O. M. Poe, chief engineer, thend little of importance was done. The soldiers of both armies felt its severity much; but the Confederates, more thinly clad and more exposed than the Nationals, suffered most. The torpor of that week was advantageous to Thomas, and when, on the 14th, the cold abated, he was ready to take the offensive, and gave orders accordingly. Hood was then behind strong intrenchments, extending from the Hillsboroa pike around to the Murfreesboroa railroad. Thomas ordered a general advance upon Hood f
the buildings in the heart of the city, covering full two hundred acres of ground, were on fire; and when the conflagration was at its height, on the night of the 15th, November 1864. the band of the Twenty-third Massachusetts played, and the soldiers chanted, the air and words of the stirring song, John Brown's soul goes marchi extending from the Hillsboroa pike around to the Murfreesboroa railroad. Thomas ordered a general advance upon Hood from his right, early on the morning of the 15th, December. while Steedman should make a vigorous demonstration from his left upon Hood's right, to distract him. The country that morning was covered with a densell between the Hardin and Granny White turnpikes, on which the commanding general stood, with the whole field of operations in view, and directed the battle on the 15th. With a large topographical map in his hand, See reduced copy on page 427. he pointed out every important locality and explained every movement, making the tex
h resulted in the capture, by the Nationals, of twelve hundred prisoners and sixteen guns, forty wagons and many small-arms, and in forcing their enemy's strong defensive line from left to right. Thomas now re-adjusted his lines. Wilson, with his cavalry, was placed on the extreme right, with Schofield at his left; Smith in the center, and Wood on the left. Steedman was on the extreme left, but less advanced. Such was the general disposition of the National forces ,on the morning of the 16th, Dec., 1864. when, at six o clock, Wood advanced, forced back Hood's skirmishers on the Franklin pike, and then inclining a little to the right, pressed on due south until confronted by Hood's new line of defenses on Overton's Hill, five miles from the city. Then Steedman moved out of Nashville by the Nolensville pike, and forming on the left of Wood, gave full security to his flank. Smith came in on Wood's right, when the new-formed line faced southward, while Schofield, holding the posit
d men of Sherman's army.--See page 225, volume Il. He accompanied that officer to Ossabaw Sound, where, at noon, they had an interview with Admiral Dahlgren, on board the Harvest Moon. Sherman made arrangements for Foster to send him some heavy siege-guns from Hilton Head, wherewith to bombard Savannah, and with Dahlgren, for engaging the forts below the city during the assault. On the following day Dec. 15. he returned to his lines. Several 30-pounder Parrott guns reached Sherman on the 17th, when he, summoned Hardee to surrender. He refused. Three days afterward, Sherman left for Hilton Head, to make arrangements with Foster for preventing a retreat of Hardee toward Charleston, if he should attempt it, leaving Slocum to get the siege-guns into proper position. Unfavorable winds and tides detained him, and on the 21st, while in one of the inland passages with which that coast abounds, he was met by Captain Dayton in a tug, bearing the news that during the previous dark and win
n in a tug, bearing the news that during the previous dark and windy night, Dec. 20. Hardee, had fled from Savannah with fifteen thousand men, crossed the river on a pontoon bridge, and was in full march on Charleston; also, that the National troops were in possession of the Confederate lines, and advancing into Savannah without opposition. The story was true. Hardee's movement had been unsuspected by the National pickets. Under cover of a heavy cannonade during the day and evening of the 20th, he had destroyed two iron-clads, several smaller vessels, the navy yard, and a large quantity of ammunition, ordnance stores, and supplies of all kinds. Then he fled in such haste that he did not spike his guns, nor destroy a vast amount of cotton belonging to the Confederacy, stored in the city. He was beyond pursuit when his flight was discovered. Our troops immediately took possession, the Twentieth Corps marching first into the city, and on the morning of the 22d, Dec., 1864. General
the forts below the city during the assault. On the following day Dec. 15. he returned to his lines. Several 30-pounder Parrott guns reached Sherman on the 17th, when he, summoned Hardee to surrender. He refused. Three days afterward, Sherman left for Hilton Head, to make arrangements with Foster for preventing a retreat of Hardee toward Charleston, if he should attempt it, leaving Slocum to get the siege-guns into proper position. Unfavorable winds and tides detained him, and on the 21st, while in one of the inland passages with which that coast abounds, he was met by Captain Dayton in a tug, bearing the news that during the previous dark and windy night, Dec. 20. Hardee, had fled from Savannah with fifteen thousand men, crossed the river on a pontoon bridge, and was in full march on Charleston; also, that the National troops were in possession of the Confederate lines, and advancing into Savannah without opposition. The story was true. Hardee's movement had been unsuspect
y and evening of the 20th, he had destroyed two iron-clads, several smaller vessels, the navy yard, and a large quantity of ammunition, ordnance stores, and supplies of all kinds. Then he fled in such haste that he did not spike his guns, nor destroy a vast amount of cotton belonging to the Confederacy, stored in the city. He was beyond pursuit when his flight was discovered. Our troops immediately took possession, the Twentieth Corps marching first into the city, and on the morning of the 22d, Dec., 1864. General Sherman, who had hastened back, rode into the town, and made his Headquarters at the fine residence of Charles Green, on Macon Street, opposite St. John's Church. General Howard's quarters were at the house of Mr. Molyneaux, late British consul at Savannah. Slocum's were at the residence of John E. Ward; and General Geary, who was appointed commander of the post, had his effice in the bank building next door to the Custom House. On the 26th he sent a dispatch to Pres
arsenal, as. Well as large amounts of signal rockets, portfires, sets of artillery harness, infantry accouterments, &c., manufactured within the past twelve months. but also Millen (where a large number of Union prisoners were confined), and Savannah and Charleston. For that purpose his troops marched rapidly. Kilpatrick swept around to, and strongly menaced Macon, Nov. 22, 1864. while Howard moved steadily forward and occupied Gordon, on the Georgia Central railroad, east of Macon, on the 23d. Meanwhile, Slocum moved along the Augusta railway to Madison, and after destroying the railroad bridge over the Oconee River, east of that place, turned southward and occupied Milledgeville, the capital of Georgia, on the same day Nov. 23. when Howard reached Gordon. The legislature of Georgia was III session when Slocum approached. The members fled, without the formality of adjournment. The Governor followed their example, and a large number of the white citizens did. likewise. Many
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