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Bridgeport, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
orthern Alabama, the movements of Hood against Sherman's communications northward of the Chattahoochee, already considered, See page 897. were begun. To watch and meet Hood's troops, as his plans might be developed, Thomas ordered Croxton's cavalry brigade to patrol the line of the Tennessee River, from Decatur to Eastport. Morgan's division was moved from Athens to Chattanooga, and Rousseau's troops were concentrated at the latter place. Steedman's division was moved from Decatur to Bridgeport. We have already considered the movements of Sherman and Hood, until) late in October, when the latter went over the Sand Mountains, westward, and threatened Decatur, and the former gave up the pursuit of his antagonist in the beautiful Chatooga Valley. See page 899. At that point of time and circumstance, we will resume the narrative of the movements of Hood. Decatur was an important place in connection with military movements at that time. The railway from Nashville on the nort
Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ved toward Bristol, Dec. 12, 1864. when his advance struck a force under Basil Duke, one of Morgan's officers, opposite Kingsport, dispersed them, captured their train, and took eighty-four of them prisoners. Burbridge pushed on to Bristol and Abingdon, capturing both places, with nearly three hundred prisoners, and destroying five loaded railway trains, and large quantities of stores and munitions of war. At Abingdon, Gillem joined Burbridge, Dec. 15. when Stoneman menaced the important saltAbingdon, Gillem joined Burbridge, Dec. 15. when Stoneman menaced the important salt-works at Saltville, in that vicinity. By this rapid advance into Virginia, Vaughan, in command of the Confederate frontier cavalry, had been flanked, but he moved on a parallel line to Marion, where Gillem fell upon and routed him Dec. 16. and chased him thirty miles into Wytheville. That place Gillem captured at dusk the same evening, with two hundred men, eight guns, and a valuable wagon-train. After destroying Wytheville, and stores there, and the railway for some distance, Gillem retu
Bells Landing (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ght at the expense of his left and center, where the main blow was to be struck. When Steedman had completed his prescribed movement, with some loss, General Smith pressed forward, en echelon, along the line of the Hardin pike, while Wilson's cavalry made a wide circuit to gain the flank of Hood's infantry on his left. Johnson's division moved along the Charlotte pike, on the extreme right, and attacked and routed Chalmer's cavalry; and late in the afternoon they assaulted a battery at Bell's Landing, eight miles below Nashville, in conjunction with gun-boats under Lieutenant-commander Fitch. The battery was not captured, but it was abandoned that night. Meanwhile, Hatch's division, moving on Smith's flank, with General Knipe's in reserve, struck Hood's left on Richland Creek, near Hardin's house. These troops were dismounted, and, in conjunction with a part of McArthur's infantry, struck vigorous blows, drove the foe from his position, and captured many prisoners and wagons. P
Mount Airy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
tville, in that vicinity. By this rapid advance into Virginia, Vaughan, in command of the Confederate frontier cavalry, had been flanked, but he moved on a parallel line to Marion, where Gillem fell upon and routed him Dec. 16. and chased him thirty miles into Wytheville. That place Gillem captured at dusk the same evening, with two hundred men, eight guns, and a valuable wagon-train. After destroying Wytheville, and stores there, and the railway for some distance, Gillem returned to Mount Airy, from which place Stoneman had sent out a brigade under Colonel Buckley, to destroy lead mines in that region, which that officer accomplished, after driving off Vaughan, who was there. Stoneman now started Dec. 17, 1864. to destroy the great salt-works already mentioned. On the way, Burbridge, in the advance, met and fought Breckinridge near Marion, nearly all one day. Gillem approached from another point to cut the foe off from the salt-works, when Breckinridge, taking counsel of prud
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
s campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. The National Army at Atlanta, 40 in the Mississippi region, 415. Forrest in Tennessee, 416. Hood menacing Decatur, 417. Forrest helping Hood, 418. Hood in Tennessee, 419. Schofield retreats before Hood to Nashville, 420. bat of Nashville, 426, 427. Hood driven out of Tennessee, 428. end of Thomas's campaign, 429. authossigned to General Thomas for the defense of Tennessee against Hood. Before doing so, let us take gia. Let us now see what was occurring in Tennessee and on its southern borders, from the time wceeded to prepare the way for an invasion of Tennessee. He crossed the Tennessee River near Waterl of the Fourteenth, Corps was hastening into Tennessee for the same purpose. These combined forcesHood. Leaving Corinth, he pushed up through Tennessee with a heavy mounted force and nine guns, anral James Brownlow, then adjutant-general of Tennessee, who was severely wounded in that battle whi[9 more...]
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
afety by flight across the Tennessee, at Brown's Ferry. Forrest, in the mean time, had pushed on to Columbia, on the Duck River, with his three thousand horsemen, but did not attack that place, for Rousseau was coming down from Nashville with fourwrenceburg, driving General Hatch from the latter place. Nov. 22. Thomas had hoped to meet Hood in battle south of Duck River, but the two divisions under General A. J. Smith, coming from Missouri, See page 280. had not arrived, and he did nono disposition to attack Schofield in front of that town. But he made movements so indicative of an intention to cross Duck River on one or both of Schofield's flanks, that the latter withdrew Nov. 27-28. to the north side of the stream, and sent hto pass. On that day Nov. 28. Schofield had been continually employed in keeping the Confederates from crossing the Duck River at Columbia, driving them back, with great loss on their side, whenever they advanced. When, late in the afternoon, he
Johnsonville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
inth, he pushed up through Tennessee with a heavy mounted force and nine guns, and struck the Tennessee River opposite Johnsonville, in Stewart County, which was connected with Nashville by railway. This was an important depot of supplies for Nashvimissaries' and quartermasters' stores, valued at a million and a half of dollars, were destroyed. Finding no enemy at Johnsonville, Schofield left Ruger's division as a garrison at that post, and, with the rest of his troops, marched to Pulaski and brigade at Mount Pleasant covered all flank approaches from that direction. Schofield withdrew Ruger's division from Johnsonville, and on the 24th of November his forces were concentrated at Columbia. In the mean time General Granger had withdrawn, and returned to Stevenson, from which he sent five fresh regiments to Murfreesboroa. The officer left in command at Johnsonville was ordered to remove the property there across to the Cumberland at Fort Donelson, and, with it and the garrison, tak
Bean's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
sissippi and Alabama. Hood's army, as an organization, had almost disappeared, when, on the 23d of January 1865. he was relieved, as he said, at his own request, at Tupelo, in Mississippi. It was during the active campaign in Middle Tennessee, just considered, that the stirring events in which Generals Gillem and Breckinridge were chief actors, occurred, as recorded on page 287. General Stoneman then took command in that region, and concentrated the forces of Gillem and Burbridge at Bean's Station. Thence he moved toward Bristol, Dec. 12, 1864. when his advance struck a force under Basil Duke, one of Morgan's officers, opposite Kingsport, dispersed them, captured their train, and took eighty-four of them prisoners. Burbridge pushed on to Bristol and Abingdon, capturing both places, with nearly three hundred prisoners, and destroying five loaded railway trains, and large quantities of stores and munitions of war. At Abingdon, Gillem joined Burbridge, Dec. 15. when Stoneman mena
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
with the Government and the loyal people of the North was closed, when, on the 11th, the commander-in-chief cut the telegraph wire that connected Atlanta with Washington City. Then that army became an isolated moving column, in the heart of the enemy's country. It moved on the morning of the 14th, Howard's wing marching by way ofation. He expected to drive Hood, and he desired ample means for following and destroying his fugitive army. His delay was misunderstood and misinterpreted at Washington, and even at the Headquarters of the army. At each there was amazement and perplexity, because of Hood's audacious penetration of Tennessee to its very heart, rman in Georgia was a hidden fact and problem. Grant finally started from City Point for Nashville, to seek a solution of the riddle that puzzled him; but at Washington City he was met by electrographs from the West that convinced him that Thomas was the right man in the right place, and he returned to his quarters satisfied that
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
had escaped across the Tennessee at Bainbridge, evading the gun-boats which Admiral S. P. Lee had sent up the river, at Thomas's request, to intercept him. While Hood was investing Nashville, he sent a cavalry force, under General Lyon, into Kentucky, to operate on the Louisville railroad. General Thomas detached General McCook's cavalry division, and sent it in pursuit of Lyon. McCook attacked and routed a part of Lyon's forces at Hopkinsville, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Cre. These important works were now utterly destroyed, while spoils, in the shape of cannon, ammunition, and railway rolling stock, fell into Stoneman's hands. The object of the expedition having been accomplished, General Burbridge returned to Kentucky, and General Stoneman, with Gillem's command, went back to Knoxville. The writer visited Nashville, and the battle-field in its vicinity, at the beginning of May, 1866, after a voyage on the Cumberland to Fort Donelson and back, See page 2
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