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Clinton (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
. At East Point he met some of Wheeler's cavalry, which Hood had left behind to operate Against Sherman. These were attacked and driven across the Flint River. Kilpatarick crossed that stream at Jonesboroa, and pursued them to Lovejoy, where Murray's brigade, dismounted, expelled them from intrenchments, captured the works, took fifty prisoners, and, in the pursuit, Atkins's brigade seized and held two of their guns. Pressing forward, Kilpatrick went through Macdonough and Monticello to Clinton, and then made a dash upon Macon, driving in some of Wheeler's cavalry there, threatening the strongly-manned works, burning a train of cars, tearing up the railway, and spreading the greatest consternation over that region. By this time the Confederates began to comprehend the grand object of Sherman's movement, but could not determine his final destination. The evident danger to Georgia and the Carolinas caused the most frantic appeals to be made to the people of the former State. Ar
Columbus (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
s instructed to send back the garrisons which General Granger had called to Stevenson, See page 419. to their former posts. He was joined by Granger at the latter place, and they reoccupied Decatur on the 27th, but too late to impede Hood's flight, for he had already crossed the Tennessee. But a cavalry force of six hundred men, under Colonel W. J. Palmer, was sent from Decatur in pursuit of Hood's train. Pressing back Roddy's cavalry near Leighton, Alabama, Palmer moved toward Columbus, Mississippi, and captured and destroyed Hood's pontoon train, ten miles from Russellville. Another force being reported in pursuit, under cover of darkness Palmer pushed for Moulton. Meeting the Confederates near Thorn Hill, he attacked and defeated 1865. them, and arrived safely at Decatur on the 6th of January. On the 30th of December, General Thomas announced to the army the. termination of the campaign, Thomas estimated his entire loss during the campaign, in all the operations unde
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
in Stewart County, which was connected with Nashville by railway. This was an important depot of ould advance, and falling slowly back toward Nashville, avoid battle until sufficiently strengthenetheir trains were safely within the lines at Nashville by noon on the day after the battle. The recavalry under Wilson, which was stationed at Edgefield, on the north side of the Cumberland. To the added the troops composing the garrison of Nashville. Wood's line was in advance of all others, mmanded by Colonel Thompson, the garrison of Nashville by General J. F. Miller, and the quartermast Hood pressed up in full strength to invest Nashville, and on the morning of the 4th of December hbattery at Bell's Landing, eight miles below Nashville, in conjunction with gun-boats under Lieutens from the city. Then Steedman moved out of Nashville by the Nolensville pike, and forming on the ounted horsemen charged farther to the The Nashville battle-field. right, and closed the way of [22 more...]
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
were suffering in other prisons with equal severity. The army now pushed vigorously on among swamps and sands, with the city of Savannah, where General Hardee was in command, as the chief objective. Howard, with the Fifteenth Corps (Osterhaus), moved down the southern side of the Ogeechee, with instructions to cross it near Eden Station, in Bryan County, while the Seventeenth (Blair) moved along the railway. Slocum, with the Twentieth (Williams), marched in the middle road, by way of Springfield, and the Fourteenth (Davis), along the Savannah River road. The latter was closely followed by Wheeler, but Kilpatrick and Baird gallantly covered the rear ,of the moving columns between the Ogeechee and Savannah rivers. While there was frequent skirmishing, and fallen trees and other obstructions were met everywhere, no enemy in force was seen anywhere, until the heads of columns were within fifteen miles of the city of Savannah. All the roads leading into that town were obstructed by
Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ion. Schofield withdrew Ruger's division from Johnsonville, and on the 24th of November his forces were concentrated at Columbia. In the mean time General Granger had withdrawn the garrisons at Athens, Decatur, and Huntsville, and returned to Stevenson, from which he sent five fresh regiments to Murfreesboroa. The officer left in command at Johnsonville was ordered to remove the property there across to the Cumberland at Fort Donelson, and, with it and the garrison, take post at Clarksville.ek, five miles north of Murfreesboroa, where there was a block-house well-manned and armed. General Thomas was unwilling to relax his hold upon Chattanooga, and endeavored to keep open the railway communication between himself and Granger, at Stevenson. For that purpose, he placed General Rousseau, with eight thousand troops, in Fort Rosecrans, See note, page 549, volume II. at Murfreesboroa. When the block-house at Overall's Creek was attacked Dec. 4, 1864. by Bate's division of Cheath
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
he direction of Nashville, through Waynesboroa and Lawrenceburg, driving General Hatch from the latter place. Nov. 22. Thomas had hoped to meet Hood in battle south of Duck River, but the two divisions under General A. J. Smith, coming from Missouri, See page 280. had not arrived, and he did not feel well prepared to do so, when his adversary moved; so he ordered Schofield to fall back to Columbia. He did so in good order, while Capron's brigade at Mount Pleasant covered all flank appro to the glorious army of patriotic women who gave their services to their imperiled country, and should never be forgotten. When General Schofield reached Nashville, Dec. 1, 1864. General A. J. Smith had arrived, with his two divisions, from Missouri, and by noon that day, the forces in the vicinity were put in battle array in an irregular semicircular line upon the hills around the city, on the southern side of the Cumberland River. General A. J. Smith's troops (detachment of the Army of th
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ithin the entire lines around Franklin, Schofield had not to exceed eighteen thousand men, when Hood, at four o'clock in the afternoon, Nov. 30. came up with all his force, and assailed the Nationals, with the intention and expectation of crushing them with one heavy blow. He had assured his soldiers that, if they should break through Schofield's line, they would disperse or destroy his army, capture his trains, drive Thomas out of Tennessee and might march on, without opposition, to the Ohio River. Hood had formed his columns for attack behind a line of dense woods; Stewart on his right, next the Harpeth, Cheatham on his left, and Lee in the rear, in reserve. A greater part of his cavalry, led by Forrest, was on his right, and the remainder were on his left. Thus prepared, the Confederates rushed forward upon Schofield's center (composed of the divisions of Ruger and Cox, of the Twenty-third Corps, about ten thousand strong), with the greatest impetuosity, in columns four deep,
Bainbridge (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
roling the thousand prisoners he had captured, he destroyed five miles of the railroad southward from the Duck River, and then pushing across the country by way of Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, he escaped over the Tennessee Oct. 6, 1864. at Bainbridge, with very little loss. Thomas's Headquarters, this is a view of the fine mansion of Mr. Cunningham, 15 high Street, Nashville, occupied by Generals Buell and Thomas, and other commanders, in that city. While these operations were goen Confederate army most effectually. This guard struck back occasionally, but the pursuit was continued to Lexington, in Alabama, where, on the 28th, December. it was suspended, when it was known that Hood had escaped across the Tennessee at Bainbridge, evading the gun-boats which Admiral S. P. Lee had sent up the river, at Thomas's request, to intercept him. While Hood was investing Nashville, he sent a cavalry force, under General Lyon, into Kentucky, to operate on the Louisville railroa
Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
king a feint toward Augusta, covering the passage of the main army over the Ogeechee River, and making an effort to liberate the prisoners at Millen. It was intendspectful distance, and Kilpatrick joined the left wing of the army near the Ogeechee River. Meanwhile the right wing, under Howard, had been moving toward the Ogeech December, the Twentieth Corps in advance. It moved down the left bank of the Ogeechee, everywhere met by fallen trees or other obstructions in the swamps. The Fouratrick and Baird gallantly covered the rear ,of the moving columns between the Ogeechee and Savannah rivers. While there was frequent skirmishing, and fallen trees aow causeways, These were for two railways, and the Augusta, Louisville, and Ogeechee dirt roads. all of which were commanded by heavy guns that were too much for tmoke-stack of a steamer had been seen in the dim distance, at the mouth of the Ogeechee. The vessel soon appeared, and signaled that she had been sent by General Fos
Flint River (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
f march of the two wings of his army, astounded, bewildered and paralyzed the inhabitants sand the armed militia, and very little resistance was offered to foragers, who swept over the country in all directions. Kilpatrick's march from Atlanta to Gordon had appeared to them, like a meteor-flash to the superstitious, mysterious and evil-boding. At East Point he met some of Wheeler's cavalry, which Hood had left behind to operate Against Sherman. These were attacked and driven across the Flint River. Kilpatarick crossed that stream at Jonesboroa, and pursued them to Lovejoy, where Murray's brigade, dismounted, expelled them from intrenchments, captured the works, took fifty prisoners, and, in the pursuit, Atkins's brigade seized and held two of their guns. Pressing forward, Kilpatrick went through Macdonough and Monticello to Clinton, and then made a dash upon Macon, driving in some of Wheeler's cavalry there, threatening the strongly-manned works, burning a train of cars, tearing
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