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Statesborough (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
and moved down the left bank of that stream towards Millen. In order to distract his foe, he directed Kilpatrick to leave his wagons and all obstructions with the left wing, make demonstrations in the direction of Augusta, and give Wheeler all the fighting he desired. At the same time Howard, with the divisions of Woods and Corse, was moving south of the Ogeechee, along the dirt road leading to Savannah, while the divisions of Hazen and J. E. Smith were still further to the right. At Statesborough the former had a severe skirmish Dec. 4. with some Confederate cavalry, which he dispersed. Slocum marched from Louisville with the left wing, on the 1st of December, the Twentieth Corps in advance. It moved down the left bank of the Ogeechee, everywhere met by fallen trees or other obstructions in the swamps. The Fourteenth Corps moved farther to the left, and Kilpatrick, supported by Baird's infantry division of that corps, pushed on toward Waynesboroa. At Thomas's Station, on t
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
hend the grand object of Sherman's movement, but could not determine his final destination. The evident danger to Georgia and the Carolinas caused the most frantic appeals to be made to the people of the former State. Arise for the defense of your native soil, shouted Beauregard in a manifesto, as he was hastening from the Appomattox to the Savannah. He told them to destroy all the roads in Sherman's front, flank and rear, and to be confident, and resolute, and trustful in an overruling Providence. He dismayed the thinking men of the State by saying, I hasten to join you in defense of your homes and firesides, for they knew his incompetency and dreaded his folly. From Richmond, B. H. Hill, a Georgia Senator, cried to the people of his State: Every citizen with his gun, and every negro with his spade and ax, can do the work of a soldier. You can destroy the enemy by retarding his march. Be firm! Seddon, the Secretary of War, indorsed the message; and the representatives of Georg
Leighton (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
d communications west of Florence. He was instructed to send back the garrisons which General Granger had called to Stevenson, See page 419. to their former posts. He was joined by Granger at the latter place, and they reoccupied Decatur on the 27th, but too late to impede Hood's flight, for he had already crossed the Tennessee. But a cavalry force of six hundred men, under Colonel W. J. Palmer, was sent from Decatur in pursuit of Hood's train. Pressing back Roddy's cavalry near Leighton, Alabama, Palmer moved toward Columbus, Mississippi, and captured and destroyed Hood's pontoon train, ten miles from Russellville. Another force being reported in pursuit, under cover of darkness Palmer pushed for Moulton. Meeting the Confederates near Thorn Hill, he attacked and defeated 1865. them, and arrived safely at Decatur on the 6th of January. On the 30th of December, General Thomas announced to the army the. termination of the campaign, Thomas estimated his entire loss during
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
loss of his adversary. During that time he had captured 11,857 men, officers and privates, besides 1,332 who had been exchanged, making a total of about 13,000. He had administered the oath of amnesty and submission to 2,207 deserters from the Confederate service, and had captured 72 serviceable guns and 8,079 small-arms. and gave orders for the proper distribution of his troops in winter cantonments at Eastport, in Northern Mississippi, at. Athens and Huntsville, in Alabama, and at Dalton, in Georgia. But General Grant and the War Department had decided that there should be no rest until the Rebellion should be crushed. Sherman had reached the sea, See page 414. and was prepared for a march northward through the Carolinas into Virginia, and the siege of Petersburg and Richmond was to be prosecuted with vigor. Accordingly, orders were issued Dec. 31, 1864. for Thomas to send Wood with the Fourth Corps to Huntsville, and to concentrate the troops of Smith, Schofield and Wilson
Elizabethtown, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
While Hood was investing Nashville, he sent a cavalry force, under General Lyon, into Kentucky, to operate on the Louisville railroad. General Thomas detached General McCook's cavalry division, and sent it in pursuit of Lyon. McCook attacked and routed a part of Lyon's forces at Hopkinsville, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Colonel Lagrange's brigade came up with the fugitive near Greenburg, and attacked and routed him, when Lyon succeeded, making a circuit by the way of Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, from whence he moved by way of McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama. On the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River with a remnant of his command, only about 200 in number. He was still pursued, and at a place known as Red Hill, he was surprised by Colonel Palmer, and half his men were made prisoners, on the 14th
Egypt Station (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
road at Tupelo, and destroyed it to Okolona. On the way, Colonel Karge surprised Dec. 25. and dispersed, at Verona, a guard over ordnance and supplies destined for Hood's army. These were a-loading in two hundred wagons, which Forrest took from Sturgis in June. See page 247. Thirty-two cars, eight warehouses filled with supplies, and the wagons, were destroyed. When he arrived at Okolona, Grierson discovered that the Confederates were in considerable force and well intrenched at Egypt Station, a few miles below; and intercepted dispatches from General Dick Taylor, at Mobile, informed him that re-enforcements were to be given to the garrison immediately. lie resolved to attack before they should arrive. He did so at day-break the next morning, Dec. 27. and while the struggle was going on, two trains of cars came up with fresh troops. Grierson quickly repulsed these, and routed the body he at first assailed, numbering about sixteen hundred men. Grierson captured a train, an
Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Memphis, and was led by General Grierson. His force consisted of thirty-five hundred well-mounted men, and their destination was the Mobile and Ohio railway. Taking a nearly straight course through Northern Mississippi, they struck that road at Tupelo, and destroyed it to Okolona. On the way, Colonel Karge surprised Dec. 25. and dispersed, at Verona, a guard over ordnance and supplies destined for Hood's army. These were a-loading in two hundred wagons, which Forrest took from Sturgis in Jund Wilson, at Eastport, to await a renewal of the winter campaign in Mississippi and Alabama. Hood's army, as an organization, had almost disappeared, when, on the 23d of January 1865. he was relieved, as he said, at his own request, at Tupelo, in Mississippi. It was during the active campaign in Middle Tennessee, just considered, that the stirring events in which Generals Gillem and Breckinridge were chief actors, occurred, as recorded on page 287. General Stoneman then took command in tha
Millen (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Army crosses the Ogeechee, 409. the March on Millen, 410. March from Millen to Savannah, 411. ca making an effort to liberate the prisoners at Millen. It was intended to deceive the Confederatesibly prevent the removal of the captives from Millen. The value of Augusta to the Confederates, asn's chief objective, until after he had passed Millen. Kilpatrick had several skirmishes with Wheelesured that the prisoners had been removed from Millen, he fell back with his whole force to the vici passed that stream, and was ready to march on Millen. Sherman's admirable stratagem in securing oved down the left bank of that stream towards Millen. In order to distract his foe, he directed KiAt Thomas's Station, on the railway connecting Millen and Augusta, he fought Wheeler, Dec. 4. and dn, on the Augusta railway. The Prison-pen at Millen. this pen was built of large logs driven inhe bullet of a guardsman. Sherman reached Millen, with the Seventeenth Corps, on the 3d of Dece[1 more...]
Hopkinsville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
cember. it was suspended, when it was known that Hood had escaped across the Tennessee at Bainbridge, evading the gun-boats which Admiral S. P. Lee had sent up the river, at Thomas's request, to intercept him. While Hood was investing Nashville, he sent a cavalry force, under General Lyon, into Kentucky, to operate on the Louisville railroad. General Thomas detached General McCook's cavalry division, and sent it in pursuit of Lyon. McCook attacked and routed a part of Lyon's forces at Hopkinsville, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Colonel Lagrange's brigade came up with the fugitive near Greenburg, and attacked and routed him, when Lyon succeeded, making a circuit by the way of Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, from whence he moved by way of McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama. On the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennesse
Harpeth River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
y pressed after the day dawned. Hour after hour skirmishing went on, while the patriots gradually moved northward. during that day and night, and early the following morning Nov. 30, 1864. they were in a strong position at Franklin, on the Harpeth River, where some stirring events had occurred the previous year. See page 118. There Schofield halted on the southern edge of the village, in order that his trains, then choking the road for miles, might be taken across the Harpeth and put wellhand. Schofield's Headquarters. Schofield's Headquarters were at the house of Dr. D. B. Cliffe, on main Street, in the village of Franklin. That village was the capital of Williamson County, Tennessee, and was situated in a bend of the Harpeth River, which formed two sides of a square, with a sharp curve at the angle, as seen in the map on page 421. Schofield was satisfied that his foes were concentrated directly in his rear; for his cavalry, following the Lewisburg pike several mil
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