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Winchester (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
e railroad. General Thomas detached General McCook's cavalry division, and sent it in pursuit of Lyon. McCook attacked and routed a part of Lyon's forces at Hopkinsville, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Colonel Lagrange's brigade came up with the fugitive near Greenburg, and attacked and routed him, when Lyon succeeded, making a circuit by the way of Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, from whence he moved by way of McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama. On the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River with a remnant of his command, only about 200 in number. He was still pursued, and at a place known as Red Hill, he was surprised by Colonel Palmer, and half his men were made prisoners, on the 14th of January. After surrendering, he escaped, by seizing a pistol, shooting a sentinel, and disappearing in the gloom of night.
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ithin the past twelve months. but also Millen (where a large number of Union prisoners were confined), and Savannah and Charleston. For that purpose his troops marched rapidly. Kilpatrick swept around to, and strongly menaced Macon, Nov. 22, 1864. By direction of Sherman, he held on to the position near the Charleston and Savannah railway, and after Hardee fled to Charleston he took possession of and occupied the Confederate works at Pocotaligo, and at the railway crossings of the Tullifinny ays afterward, Sherman left for Hilton Head, to make arrangements with Foster for preventing a retreat of Hardee toward Charleston, if he should attempt it, leaving Slocum to get the siege-guns into proper position. Unfavorable winds and tides detairdee, had fled from Savannah with fifteen thousand men, crossed the river on a pontoon bridge, and was in full march on Charleston; also, that the National troops were in possession of the Confederate lines, and advancing into Savannah without opposi
Glasgow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
was investing Nashville, he sent a cavalry force, under General Lyon, into Kentucky, to operate on the Louisville railroad. General Thomas detached General McCook's cavalry division, and sent it in pursuit of Lyon. McCook attacked and routed a part of Lyon's forces at Hopkinsville, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Colonel Lagrange's brigade came up with the fugitive near Greenburg, and attacked and routed him, when Lyon succeeded, making a circuit by the way of Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, from whence he moved by way of McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama. On the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River with a remnant of his command, only about 200 in number. He was still pursued, and at a place known as Red Hill, he was surprised by Colonel Palmer, and half his men were made prisoners, on the 14th of January. Af
Benton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ndred men. Grierson captured a train, and made about five hundred prisoners. Among the Confederates killed in this engagement was General Gholson, of Mississippi. Grierson now moved southwestward, distracting his foe by feints. He finally struck the Mississippi Central railroad at Winona Station, and tore up the track several miles each way, while the Fourth Iowa destroyed cloth and shoe factories at Bankston. This was followed by the defeat of Confederate cavalry under Colonel Wood, at Benton, by Colonel Osband, and the speedy march of the expedition to Vicksburg, with its trophies of five hundred prisoners, eight hundred beeves, and a thousand; liberated slaves. It had been a destructive and alarming raid, During the raid, Grierson's men destroyed 95 railway cars, 300 wagons, 30 full warehouses, and liberated, by taking them prisoners, 100 Union soldiers who had been famishing in Confederate prisons, and had joined the army with a hope of thus effecting their escape. and eff
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
from Millen to Savannah, 411. capture of Fort McAllister, 412. evacuation of Savannah, 413. the 4. Sherman ordered General Hazen to carry Fort McAllister by assault with his second division of that day his force was deployed in front of Fort McAllister, a strong inclosed redoubt, garrisoned byund, for a Government steamer. Hazen and Fort McAllister were then exchanging shots, the former wie National army, but was in doubt whether Fort McAllister was in the hands of friends or foe. Gete struggle won a victory. Before sunset Fort McAllister, its garrison and armament, were in the hnd with Howard, was rowed quickly down to Fort McAllister, unmindful of the danger of torpedo exploected in Ossabaw Sound. The capture of Fort McAllister was a brilliant ending of the Great Marchd the War Department, Sherman returned to Fort McAllister, and lodged that night; and early the nexhe night. The first vessel that passed Fort McAllister from the sea, was the mail-steamer bearin[1 more...]
Brentwood, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
s on their respective fronts, carried all before them with very little loss. Wilson's dismounted horsemen charged farther to the The Nashville battle-field. right, and closed the way of retreat along the Granny White pike. These advantages were announced by shouts of victory. Wood and Steedman heard them, and again assailed the Confederates on Overton's Hill. They were met by a heavy fire; but they pressed forward, carried all before them, and drove the foe in such haste through the Brentwood Pass, where the Franklin pike goes through the hills, that they left behind them their dead, wounded, prisoners, and guns. It was a complete rout. During the two days in which the battle of Nashville was fought, Thomas captured from Hood four thousand four hundred and sixty-two prisoners, of whom two hundred and eighty-seven were officers. He had also captured fifty-three guns, and many small-arms. More important than these, he had broken the spirit of Hood's army beyond hope of recove
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
leader signaled that he had invested it. Then Sherman signaled back that it was important to capture it at once. Meanwhile the smoke-stack of a steamer had been seen in the dim distance, at the mouth of the Ogeechee. The vessel soon appeared, and signaled that she had been sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to communicate with the National army, but was in doubt whether Fort McAllister was in the hands of friends or foe. General Foster was in command of the coast islands of South Carolina when Sherman was engaged in his Georgia campaign, and he was directed to make a demonstration in his favor, when, as it was expected, he would approach Pocotaligo, on the Charleston and Savannah railway, between the two cities, at the close of November. He could spare only 5,000 men from his various garrisons, for this purpose, and at the head of these he ascended the Broad River on steamers, and landed at Boyd's Neck on the 30th of November. From that point he sent General J. P. Hatch
East Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
the presence of great armies. Sherman's audacity, and the uncertainty concerning his real destination, because of the widely separated lines of march of the two wings of his army, astounded, bewildered and paralyzed the inhabitants sand the armed militia, and very little resistance was offered to foragers, who swept over the country in all directions. Kilpatrick's march from Atlanta to Gordon had appeared to them, like a meteor-flash to the superstitious, mysterious and evil-boding. At East Point he met some of Wheeler's cavalry, which Hood had left behind to operate Against Sherman. These were attacked and driven across the Flint River. Kilpatarick crossed that stream at Jonesboroa, and pursued them to Lovejoy, where Murray's brigade, dismounted, expelled them from intrenchments, captured the works, took fifty prisoners, and, in the pursuit, Atkins's brigade seized and held two of their guns. Pressing forward, Kilpatrick went through Macdonough and Monticello to Clinton, and th
Spring Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
hofield's flanks, that the latter withdrew Nov. 27-28. to the north side of the stream, and sent his trains toward Nashville. Then, informed that Hood had crossed the river six miles above Columbia, he ordered Stanley to follow his trains to Spring Hill. The command was promptly executed just in time to save them from Forrest's cavalry, hovering near, and which Stanley drove off just as they were about to pounce upon the wagons and their guard. Stanley was speedily attacked by a very strong late in the afternoon, he heard of Stanley's peril, he took Ruger's division, and hastened to his support, leaving orders for the remainder of his force to follow. He encountered some detachments of cavalry on the way, and when he arrived at Spring Hill, he found the main body of the Confederates bivouacked within half a mile of the road over which his army must pass. He left them undisturbed. His troops passed by at midnight, and pushed on northward, closely pursued, and sometimes severely
Bryan (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
em to the performance of every service required to crush the wicked rebellion. These captives had all been removed, no one then knew whither, and were suffering in other prisons with equal severity. The army now pushed vigorously on among swamps and sands, with the city of Savannah, where General Hardee was in command, as the chief objective. Howard, with the Fifteenth Corps (Osterhaus), moved down the southern side of the Ogeechee, with instructions to cross it near Eden Station, in Bryan County, while the Seventeenth (Blair) moved along the railway. Slocum, with the Twentieth (Williams), marched in the middle road, by way of Springfield, and the Fourteenth (Davis), along the Savannah River road. The latter was closely followed by Wheeler, but Kilpatrick and Baird gallantly covered the rear ,of the moving columns between the Ogeechee and Savannah rivers. While there was frequent skirmishing, and fallen trees and other obstructions were met everywhere, no enemy in force was see
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