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Pascagoula River (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
5, 1864. from Vicksburg, fought and vanquished Confederates on the Big Black River, and destroyed several miles of the railway connecting New Orleans with Tennessee, with its bridges and rolling stock, much cotton and valuable stores. Another cavalry expedition, led by General Davidson, was sent out from Baton Rouge, and struck the same railway at Tangipaha, Nov. 30. laying waste its track and other property. Then Davidson pushed on eastward, in the direction of Mobile, almost to the Pascagoula River, causing much alarm for the safety of that city. Still another expedition, and more important than the two just mentioned, went out from the Mississippi three weeks later. Dec. 21. It was sent from Memphis, and was led by General Grierson. His force consisted of thirty-five hundred well-mounted men, and their destination was the Mobile and Ohio railway. Taking a nearly straight course through Northern Mississippi, they struck that road at Tupelo, and destroyed it to Okolona. On t
Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
erman and Howard reached Cheves's rice-mill, used as a signal station, where, for two days the officer in charge had been looking anxiously in the direction of Ossabaw Sound, for a Government steamer. Hazen and Fort McAllister were then exchanging shots, the former with the hope of thereby attracting the attention of the fleet. W Captain Williamson, told Howard that his scout, Captain Duncan, had passed the fort and communicated with Foster and Dahlgren, whom he then hourly expected in Ossabaw Sound. The capture of Fort McAllister was a brilliant ending of the Great March from the Chattahoochee to the sea, and crowned General Hazen with an unfading chaping Colonel Markland and twenty tons of letters and papers for the officers and men of Sherman's army.--See page 225, volume Il. He accompanied that officer to Ossabaw Sound, where, at noon, they had an interview with Admiral Dahlgren, on board the Harvest Moon. Sherman made arrangements for Foster to send him some heavy siege-guns
Sunbury, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
chee, so that no supplies could reach the city by the accustomed channels of communication. Sherman's army was well supplied, and had the open country behind it, yet he deemed communication with the fleet of vital importance, and desired the possession of the Ogeechee as a proper avenue of future supply for his. troops, from the sea. He therefore ordered Kilpatrick to cross the Ogeechee on a pontoon bridge, reconnoiter Fort McAllister, that commanded it below the railway, and proceeding to Sunbury, open communication with the fleet. Howard had already sent a scout (Captain Duncan) in a canoe down the Ogeechee for the same purpose. Finally, on the 13th, December, 1864. Sherman ordered General Hazen to carry Fort McAllister by assault with his second division of the Fifteenth Corps. That active officer at once crossed the Ogeechee at King's Bridge, and by one o'clock on that day his force was deployed in front of Fort McAllister, a strong inclosed redoubt, garrisoned by two hundred
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ry brigade to patrol the line of the Tennessee River, from Decatur to Eastport. Morgan's division was moved from Athens to Cd at the latter place. Steedman's division was moved from Decatur to Bridgeport. We have already considered the movementster went over the Sand Mountains, westward, and threatened Decatur, and the former gave up the pursuit of his antagonist in t we will resume the narrative of the movements of Hood. Decatur was an important place in connection with military movemenime General Granger had withdrawn the garrisons at Athens, Decatur, and Huntsville, and returned to Stevenson, from which he joined by Granger at the latter place, and they reoccupied Decatur on the 27th, but too late to impede Hood's flight, for he six hundred men, under Colonel W. J. Palmer, was sent from Decatur in pursuit of Hood's train. Pressing back Roddy's cavalrye attacked and defeated 1865. them, and arrived safely at Decatur on the 6th of January. On the 30th of December, General
Stewart (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
herman. See page 400. General Thomas J. Wood's division of the Fourth Corps reached Athens on the 31st, closely followed by the other divisions, when Stanley, the commander of the corps, concentrated his whole force at Pulaski. In the mean time, Forrest had Thomas J. Wood. turned his face northward again, and was busy in aiding Hood. Leaving Corinth, he pushed up through Tennessee with a heavy mounted force and nine guns, and struck the Tennessee River opposite Johnsonville, in Stewart County, which was connected with Nashville by railway. This was an important depot of supplies for Nashville, and these Forrest came to destroy. They were guarded by one thousand negro troops under Colonel C. R. Thompson, and three gun-boats, commanded by Lieutenant E. M. King. Forrest opened his guns upon the post, Oct. 28. and after several days' sharp contest, he withdrew Nov. 5. on hearing of the approach of Schofield, with his corps, from Nashville, by railway. Forrest's work was acc
Montgomery Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ght man in the right place, and he returned to his quarters satisfied that all was well in Tennessee. Hood pressed up in full strength to invest Nashville, and on the morning of the 4th of December had formed his line, with his salient on Montgomery Hill, not more than six hundred yards from Wood's, at Thomas's center. His main line occupied the high ground on the southeast side of Brown's Creek, with his right resting on the Nolensville pike, and his left behind Richland Creek, retiring onter, had moved forward parallel with Smith's advancing column, and at one o'clock in the afternoon, the Third Brigade of Wagner's division, led by Colonel S. P. Post, of the Fifty-ninth Illinois, gallantly charged and carried Hood's works on Montgomery Hill, and took some prisoners. Then Thomas sent Schofield, who was held in reserve, rapidly to the right of Smith, by which the National cavalry was allowed to operate more freely in the Confederate rear. The whole line then moved forward. Woo
King's Bridge (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
d Kilpatrick to cross the Ogeechee on a pontoon bridge, reconnoiter Fort McAllister, that commanded it below the railway, and proceeding to Sunbury, open communication with the fleet. Howard had already sent a scout (Captain Duncan) in a canoe down the Ogeechee for the same purpose. Finally, on the 13th, December, 1864. Sherman ordered General Hazen to carry Fort McAllister by assault with his second division of the Fifteenth Corps. That active officer at once crossed the Ogeechee at King's Bridge, and by one o'clock on that day his force was deployed in front of Fort McAllister, a strong inclosed redoubt, garrisoned by two hundred men, under Major Anderson, artillery and infantry, and having one mortar and twenty-three guns en barbette. At about this time Sherman and Howard reached Cheves's rice-mill, used as a signal station, where, for two days the officer in charge had been looking anxiously in the direction of Ossabaw Sound, for a Government steamer. Hazen and Fort McAlli
McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rate on the Louisville railroad. General Thomas detached General McCook's cavalry division, and sent it in pursuit of Lyon. McCook attacked and routed a part of Lyon's forces at Hopkinsville, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Colonel Lagrange's brigade came up with the fugitive near Greenburg, and attacked and routed him, when Lyon succeeded, making a circuit by the way of Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, from whence he moved by way of McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama. On the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River with a remnant of his command, only about 200 in number. He was still pursued, and at a place known as Red Hill, he was surprised by Colonel Palmer, and half his men were made prisoners, on the 14th of January. After surrendering, he escaped, by seizing a pistol, shooting a sentinel, and disappearing in
Mount Pleasant (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
The latter, looking out from Columbia, saw his peril, and met it as usual. Paroling the thousand prisoners he had captured, he destroyed five miles of the railroad southward from the Duck River, and then pushing across the country by way of Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, he escaped over the Tennessee Oct. 6, 1864. at Bainbridge, with very little loss. Thomas's Headquarters, this is a view of the fine mansion of Mr. Cunningham, 15 high Street, Nashville, occupied by Generals Buell and l A. J. Smith, coming from Missouri, See page 280. had not arrived, and he did not feel well prepared to do so, when his adversary moved; so he ordered Schofield to fall back to Columbia. He did so in good order, while Capron's brigade at Mount Pleasant covered all flank approaches from that direction. Schofield withdrew Ruger's division from Johnsonville, and on the 24th of November his forces were concentrated at Columbia. In the mean time General Granger had withdrawn the garrisons at A
Gordon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
of the convicts seemed to think that fighting Sherman was to be preferred to imprisonment, for only that number accepted the Governor's offer. All confidence in President Davis and the Confederate Government had vanished. The great mass of the people were satisfied that it was the rich man's war and the poor man's fight, as they expressed it, and would no longer lend themselves to the wicked work of the corrupt Conspirators at Richmond. When Howard struck the Georgia Central railway at Gordon, his troops began the work of destroying the road eastward from that point to Griswoldsville, and while thus engaged, the most serious contest of the Georgia campaign occurred. While the right wing of the Fifteenth Corps, under General Walcott, was operating at Griswoldsville, about five thousand Confederates came upon them from the direction of Macon. Nov. 22, 1864. These consisted of several brigades of militia, under General Phillips, and a part of Hardee's command, which had been sent
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