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Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
We have observed that Hood, late in September, crossed the Chattahoochee, and began operations against Sherman's communications. See page 396. Meanwhile, and in co-operation with Hood (whose chief objective was evidently Nashville), Forrest, the bold and active cavalry leader, who had been in Northern Alabama for several weeks keeping re-enforcements from joining Sherman from the Mississippi, proceeded to prepare the way for an invasion of Tennessee. He crossed the Tennessee River near Waterloo, and on the 25th, Sept. 1864. appeared before Athens, in Northern Alabama, with a force of light cavalry, about seven thousand strong, and invested it. He opened a 12-pounder battery on the town, and twice demanded its surrender. It was refused, but finally, at a personal interview between Forrest and Colonel Campbell, the commander of the little garrison of six hundred negro troops, the latter was persuaded to surrender the post. Re-enforcements sufficient to hold the place (the Eighth
Richland Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
lank of Hood's infantry on his left. Johnson's division moved along the Charlotte pike, on the extreme right, and attacked and routed Chalmer's cavalry; and late in the afternoon they assaulted a battery at Bell's Landing, eight miles below Nashville, in conjunction with gun-boats under Lieutenant-commander Fitch. The battery was not captured, but it was abandoned that night. Meanwhile, Hatch's division, moving on Smith's flank, with General Knipe's in reserve, struck Hood's left on Richland Creek, near Hardin's house. These troops were dismounted, and, in conjunction with a part of McArthur's infantry, struck vigorous blows, drove the foe from his position, and captured many prisoners and wagons. Pushing on, they captured a four-gun redoubt, and turned the artillery upon the Confederates; and a little farther on they carried a stronger redoubt, and captured four more guns and three hundred prisoners. While these successful movements were occurring on the right, General Wood,
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
River, from Decatur to Eastport. Morgan's division was moved from Athens to Chattanooga, and Rousseau's troops were concentrated at the latter place. Steedman's dinessee River, and met the one extending westward to Memphis, and eastward to Chattanooga. There General Granger was stationed with a considerable force, when Hood at, also resting on the Cumberland. General Steedman had been called up from Chattanooga, with detachments of Sherman's army, and a brigade of negro troops under Col well-manned and armed. General Thomas was unwilling to relax his hold upon Chattanooga, and endeavored to keep open the railway communication between himself and Gthe writer went to and sketched several places of interest. Among these was Fort Negley, See page 265, volume Il. and the spacious mansion of Mrs. Ackling, the Hent southward to visit Murfreesboroa, and the extended theater of conflict between there and Chattanooga and Atlanta, already mentioned in other pages of this work.
Broad River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rt McAllister was in the hands of friends or foe. General Foster was in command of the coast islands of South Carolina when Sherman was engaged in his Georgia campaign, and he was directed to make a demonstration in his favor, when, as it was expected, he would approach Pocotaligo, on the Charleston and Savannah railway, between the two cities, at the close of November. He could spare only 5,000 men from his various garrisons, for this purpose, and at the head of these he ascended the Broad River on steamers, and landed at Boyd's Neck on the 30th of November. From that point he sent General J. P. Hatch to seize the railway near Grahamsville. Having missed his way, Hatch did not reach his destination till the next morning, when he was met by a strong Confederate force intrenched on a hill covering Grahamsville and the road. This position he assailed, when an obstinate fight ensued, which resulted in his defeat, and retreat at evening, with a loss of 746 men. Foster then sent Gen
McGuire (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
hat Thomas was the right man in the right place, and he returned to his quarters satisfied that all was well in Tennessee. Hood pressed up in full strength to invest Nashville, and on the morning of the 4th of December had formed his line, with his salient on Montgomery Hill, not more than six hundred yards from Wood's, at Thomas's center. His main line occupied the high ground on the southeast side of Brown's Creek, with his right resting on the Nolensville pike, and his left behind Richland Creek, retiring on the Hillsboroa pike, with cavalry on both flanks, extending to the river. On the same day, there was a smart contest at the railway crossing of Overall's Creek, five miles north of Murfreesboroa, where there was a block-house well-manned and armed. General Thomas was unwilling to relax his hold upon Chattanooga, and endeavored to keep open the railway communication between himself and Granger, at Stevenson. For that purpose, he placed General Rousseau, with eight thous
Thomas Station (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ht. At Statesborough the former had a severe skirmish Dec. 4. with some Confederate cavalry, which he dispersed. Slocum marched from Louisville with the left wing, on the 1st of December, the Twentieth Corps in advance. It moved down the left bank of the Ogeechee, everywhere met by fallen trees or other obstructions in the swamps. The Fourteenth Corps moved farther to the left, and Kilpatrick, supported by Baird's infantry division of that corps, pushed on toward Waynesboroa. At Thomas's Station, on the railway connecting Millen and Augusta, he fought Wheeler, Dec. 4. and drove him from his, barricades through Waynesboroa and across Brier Creek, full eight miles, while Baird was breaking up the iron road and destroying bridges. Then cavalry and infantry rejoined the Fourteenth Corps, which was concentrated in the vicinity of Lumpkin's Station, on the Augusta railway. The Prison-pen at Millen. this pen was built of large logs driven in the ground, with sentry posts on the
Oconee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
a Central railroad, east of Macon, on the 23d. Meanwhile, Slocum moved along the Augusta railway to Madison, and after destroying the railroad bridge over the Oconee River, east of that place, turned southward and occupied Milledgeville, the capital of Georgia, on the same day Nov. 23. when Howard reached Gordon. The legislatfter this blow upon its defenders, but such was not a part of Sherman's plan, and the former was content to cover the roads diverging from that city toward the Oconee River. Howard and Slocum now moved eastward simultaneously, the former from Gordon to Sandersville, destroying the railway to Tennille Station. He was confronted at the Oconee River, when laying a pontoon bridge for the passage of his army, by a force under General Wayne, of Georgia, composed of some of Wheeler's cavalry, a body of militia, and convicts from the Milledgeville penitentiary, already mentioned. Most of the latter, dressed in their prison garb, were captured in a skirmish th
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ation of Savannah, 413. the National troops in Savannah, 414. raids in the Mississippi region, 415. Forrest in Tennessee, 416. Hood menacing Decatur, 417. Forree a brief glance at some operations by National troops, sent out from the Lower Mississippi, to prevent the concentration of forces west of Georgia against Sherman das the Mobile and Ohio railway. Taking a nearly straight course through Northern Mississippi, they struck that road at Tupelo, and destroyed it to Okolona. On the wrs. Among the Confederates killed in this engagement was General Gholson, of Mississippi. Grierson now moved southwestward, distracting his foe by feints. He fin proper distribution of his troops in winter cantonments at Eastport, in Northern Mississippi, at. Athens and Huntsville, in Alabama, and at Dalton, in Georgia. But ofield and Wilson, at Eastport, to await a renewal of the winter campaign in Mississippi and Alabama. Hood's army, as an organization, had almost disappeared, when,
Okolona (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
al Grierson. His force consisted of thirty-five hundred well-mounted men, and their destination was the Mobile and Ohio railway. Taking a nearly straight course through Northern Mississippi, they struck that road at Tupelo, and destroyed it to Okolona. On the way, Colonel Karge surprised Dec. 25. and dispersed, at Verona, a guard over ordnance and supplies destined for Hood's army. These were a-loading in two hundred wagons, which Forrest took from Sturgis in June. See page 247. Thirty-two cars, eight warehouses filled with supplies, and the wagons, were destroyed. When he arrived at Okolona, Grierson discovered that the Confederates were in considerable force and well intrenched at Egypt Station, a few miles below; and intercepted dispatches from General Dick Taylor, at Mobile, informed him that re-enforcements were to be given to the garrison immediately. lie resolved to attack before they should arrive. He did so at day-break the next morning, Dec. 27. and while the
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
atch and meet Hood's troops, as his plans might be developed, Thomas ordered Croxton's cavalry brigade to patrol the line of the Tennessee River, from Decatur to Eastport. Morgan's division was moved from Athens to Chattanooga, and Rousseau's troops were concentrated at the latter place. Steedman's division was moved from Decatuonfederate service, and had captured 72 serviceable guns and 8,079 small-arms. and gave orders for the proper distribution of his troops in winter cantonments at Eastport, in Northern Mississippi, at. Athens and Huntsville, in Alabama, and at Dalton, in Georgia. But General Grant and the War Department had decided that there shou orders were issued Dec. 31, 1864. for Thomas to send Wood with the Fourth Corps to Huntsville, and to concentrate the troops of Smith, Schofield and Wilson, at Eastport, to await a renewal of the winter campaign in Mississippi and Alabama. Hood's army, as an organization, had almost disappeared, when, on the 23d of January 186
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