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Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ered and alarmed by Sherman's movements, 407. Macon and Augusta threatened, 408. the Army crosses Macdonough for Gordon, on the railway east of Macon, and Slocum's by the town of Decatur, for Madilace his army in the heart of Georgia, between Macon and Augusta, and so compel his foe to divide hlpatrick swept around to, and strongly menaced Macon, Nov. 22, 1864. while Howard moved steadily frdon, on the Georgia Central railroad, east of Macon, on the 23d. Meanwhile, Slocum moved along thry of the Great March, page 58. excepting near Macon, and no serious obstacle, excepting such as wrnticello to Clinton, and then made a dash upon Macon, driving in some of Wheeler's cavalry there, tfederates came upon them from the direction of Macon. Nov. 22, 1864. These consisted of several br while the assailants, who finally fled toward Macon, left three hundred dead upon the field. The erely wounded. Howard could easily have taken Macon, after this blow upon its defenders, but such
Lawrenceburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ng out from Columbia, saw his peril, and met it as usual. Paroling the thousand prisoners he had captured, he destroyed five miles of the railroad southward from the Duck River, and then pushing across the country by way of Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, he escaped over the Tennessee Oct. 6, 1864. at Bainbridge, with very little loss. Thomas's Headquarters, this is a view of the fine mansion of Mr. Cunningham, 15 high Street, Nashville, occupied by Generals Buell and Thomas, and other and turned his face toward the sea, Hood threw the remainder of his army over the Tennessee Nov. 17, 1864. on a pontoon bridge at Florence, and two days afterward, moved on parallel roads in the direction of Nashville, through Waynesboroa and Lawrenceburg, driving General Hatch from the latter place. Nov. 22. Thomas had hoped to meet Hood in battle south of Duck River, but the two divisions under General A. J. Smith, coming from Missouri, See page 280. had not arrived, and he did not fe
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
s army.--See page 225, volume Il. He accompanied that officer to Ossabaw Sound, where, at noon, they had an interview with Admiral Dahlgren, on board the Harvest Moon. Sherman made arrangements for Foster to send him some heavy siege-guns from Hilton Head, wherewith to bombard Savannah, and with Dahlgren, for engaging the forts below the city during the assault. On the following day Dec. 15. he returned to his lines. Several 30-pounder Parrott guns reached Sherman on the 17th, when he, summoned Hardee to surrender. He refused. Three days afterward, Sherman left for Hilton Head, to make arrangements with Foster for preventing a retreat of Hardee toward Charleston, if he should attempt it, leaving Slocum to get the siege-guns into proper position. Unfavorable winds and tides detained him, and on the 21st, while in one of the inland passages with which that coast abounds, he was met by Captain Dayton in a tug, bearing the news that during the previous dark and windy night, Dec.
Manchester, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
atroling that stream in Northern Alabama, with several gun-boats, to intercept them should they fly southward. Generals Rousseau, Steedman, Morgan, Washburne and Croxton, were now (under the direction of General Thomas, who had arrived at Nashville on the 3d of October) joined in the grand hunt for Forrest. The latter, looking out from Columbia, saw his peril, and met it as usual. Paroling the thousand prisoners he had captured, he destroyed five miles of the railroad southward from the Duck River, and then pushing across the country by way of Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, he escaped over the Tennessee Oct. 6, 1864. at Bainbridge, with very little loss. Thomas's Headquarters, this is a view of the fine mansion of Mr. Cunningham, 15 high Street, Nashville, occupied by Generals Buell and Thomas, and other commanders, in that city. While these operations were going on in Tennessee and Northern Alabama, the movements of Hood against Sherman's communications northward of t
Decherd (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ousseau was there, and made the assailants cautious. After sharp skirmishing the greater part of a day, Sept. 29. Forrest withdrew, and marched eastward, toward the Chattanooga railway, with his whole force. He struck it between Tullahoma and Decherd, but had scarcely begun its destruction, when he was confronted by Rousseau, who had hastened by railway, around by .Nashville, and reached Tullahoma, while General Steedman, who had crossed the Tennessee from Northern Georgia, was coming up rapision of the Fourteenth, Corps was hastening into Tennessee for the same purpose. These combined forces drove Forrest from the railway before he had damaged it much, when he retraced his steps to Fayetteville, the termination of a railroad from Decherd. There he divided his forces, giving Buford, his second in command, four thousand of them, and reserving three thousand for himself. Buford went directly south, threatened Huntsville, and again attacked Athens, which General Granger, in comman
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
. General A. J. Smith had arrived, with his two divisions, from Missouri, and by noon that day, the forces in the vicinity were put in battle array in an irregular semicircular line upon the hills around the city, on the southern side of the Cumberland River. General A. J. Smith's troops (detachment of the Army of the Tennessee) were on the right, resting on the river; the Fourth Corps--commanded by General T. J. Wood, in the absence of the wounded Stanley —— in the center; and the Twenty-third lle, when the latter commenced a hasty retreat. Colonel Lagrange's brigade came up with the fugitive near Greenburg, and attacked and routed him, when Lyon succeeded, making a circuit by the way of Elizabethtown and Glasgow, in crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, from whence he moved by way of McMinnville and Winchester, Tennessee, to Larkinsville, Alabama. On the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennessee R
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
im. General Rousseau was there, and made the assailants cautious. After sharp skirmishing the greater part of a day, Sept. 29. Forrest withdrew, and marched eastward, toward the Chattanooga railway, with his whole force. He struck it between Tullahoma and Decherd, but had scarcely begun its destruction, when he was confronted by Rousseau, who had hastened by railway, around by .Nashville, and reached Tullahoma, while General Steedman, who had crossed the Tennessee from Northern Georgia, was Tullahoma, while General Steedman, who had crossed the Tennessee from Northern Georgia, was coming up rapidly from the southwest with five thousand troops. At the same time, General Morgan's division of the Fourteenth, Corps was hastening into Tennessee for the same purpose. These combined forces drove Forrest from the railway before he had damaged it much, when he retraced his steps to Fayetteville, the termination of a railroad from Decherd. There he divided his forces, giving Buford, his second in command, four thousand of them, and reserving three thousand for himself. Buford
Bankston (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
kly repulsed these, and routed the body he at first assailed, numbering about sixteen hundred men. Grierson captured a train, and made about five hundred prisoners. Among the Confederates killed in this engagement was General Gholson, of Mississippi. Grierson now moved southwestward, distracting his foe by feints. He finally struck the Mississippi Central railroad at Winona Station, and tore up the track several miles each way, while the Fourth Iowa destroyed cloth and shoe factories at Bankston. This was followed by the defeat of Confederate cavalry under Colonel Wood, at Benton, by Colonel Osband, and the speedy march of the expedition to Vicksburg, with its trophies of five hundred prisoners, eight hundred beeves, and a thousand; liberated slaves. It had been a destructive and alarming raid, During the raid, Grierson's men destroyed 95 railway cars, 300 wagons, 30 full warehouses, and liberated, by taking them prisoners, 100 Union soldiers who had been famishing in Confeder
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
of Macon, and Slocum's by the town of Decatur, for Madison and Milledgeville. Then, by Sherman's order, and under the direction of Captain Oconee River, east of that place, turned southward and occupied Milledgeville, the capital of Georgia, on the same day Nov. 23. when Howard ting. Sherman encamped on one of his plantations, not far from Milledgeville, and there received a Macon newspaper containing a proclamationhim have no rest. And Governor Brown, just before he fled from Milledgeville, issued a proclamation ordering a levy, en masse, of the whole s; and offered a pardon to the prisoners in the penitentiary at Milledgeville, if they would volunteer and prove themselves good soldiers. Bithout much difficulty. Slocum also moved to Sandersville from Milledgeville, and had some skirmishing near the former, with the main body oer's cavalry. At the same time Kilpatrick moved from Gordon to Milledgeville, and thence by Sparta and Gibson to Waynesboroa, on the Augusta
Carter's Hill (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
amounted to almost a surprise. He was at Fort Granger, across the river, when the attack commenced, and could not return to his lines, so the command in the battle devolved on General Stanley, and Schofield could only watch the struggle from the ramparts, which he did with great anxiety. Battle of Franklin. Two brigades of Wagner's division of the Fourth Corps, were thrown forward, and held some slight breastworks a few hundred yards in front of the main line, whose key-point was Carter's Hill, a gentle eminence crossed by the Columbia and Nashville pike, leading through Franklin. Behind the main line at this point was Opdyke's brigade of Wood's division. Toward that hill, the National center, the heaviest blow was directed. The charge of Hood's columns was so impetuous and weighty, notwithstanding it was met by a fearful fire of musketry and artillery, that it was irresistible. The Union advance was hurled back in utter confusion upon the main line, and all but those who
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