hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 848 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 615 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 439 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 392 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 374 0 Browse Search
George G. Meade 374 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 371 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 355 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 344 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 343 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,745 total hits in 455 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 16
of future apprehension on both sides of the Atlantic; and happy will it be both for England and America, if with her, beneath the waters of the channel, may be buried the memory of her career and of the mischief she has done. it seems proper to record here, in anticipation of other transactions of the War, the prominent events in the career of the last of the Confederate pirate ships, and which performed the last acts of hostility against the Republic. She was the Shenandoah, a Clyde (Scotland) built vessel, long and rakish, of seven hundred and ninety tons burden, with an auxiliary engine of two hundred and Twenty nominal horse power, and capable of an average speed of ten knots an hour. the Shenandoah was originally the sea-king. she left London with that name early in October, 1864, as an East Indiaman, armed with two guns, as usual, land cleared for Bombay. A steamer, named Laurel, took from Liverpool a lot of Southern gentlemen (as the historian of the Shenandoah's cruis
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
as a general rising of the members of this organization in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, in co-operation with a force under Price, who was to invaland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howe all Democrats, namely: Delaware--Riddle, Saulsbury; Kentucky--Davis, Powell; Indiana--Hendricks; California--McDougall.--6. Six Democrats did not vote, namely, Buc, Smith, Yeaman; Ohio--Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding; Indiana--Colfax, Derwent. Julian, Orth; Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Nort, Johnson, Long, Morris, Noble, O'Neill. Pendleton, C. A. White, J. W. White; Indiana--Cravens, Edgerton, Harrington, Holman, Law; Illinois--J. C. Allen, W. T. Allete, namely, Lazear, Pennsylvania; Marcy, New Hampshire; McDowell and Voorhees, Indiana; Le Blond and McKinney, Ohio; Middleton and Rogers, New Jersey. Thus the natio
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, 276. was a general rising of the members of this organization in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, in co-operation with a force under Price, who was to invade Missouri. As we have already observed, See page 277. Price performed his part with the open enemies of t great calamity. and Price and his ten thousand armed followers in Missouri found no adequate support, as we have observed. See page 277. Te, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howard; Iowa--Grimes, Harlahis measure was first submitted to the Senate by Mr. Henderson, of Missouri, on the 11th of January, 1864, and, as we have observed, was adopt Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne; Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, Rollins; Michigan--BaldwinJ. C. Allen, W. T. Allen; Edw. Harris; Wisconsin--Brown, Eldridge; Missouri--Hall, Scott.--56. Eight Democrats did not vote, namely, Lazear, P
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of only the two late slave-labor States, Delaware and Kentucky, and the State of New Jersey. The offer of sympathy and protection to the soldiers in the field, by onnecticut--Dixon, Foster; Vermont--Collamer, Foot: New York, Harris, Morgan; New Jersey, Tenyck; Pennsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van W.--6. Six Democrats did not vote, namely, Buckalew of Pennsylvania; Wright of New Jersey; Hicks of Maryland; Bowden and Carlisle, of West Virginia; Richardson of Illivin, Miller, Morris, Nelson, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenburg; New Jersey--Starr; Pennsylvania--Bailey, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelly, McAllister, Moler, Kalbfleisch, Keirnan, Pruyn, Townsend, Ward, Winfield, B. Wood, F. Wood; New Jersey--Perry, Steele; Pennsylvania--Ancona, Dawson, Denison, Johnson, Miller, Randaell and Voorhees, Indiana; Le Blond and McKinney, Ohio; Middleton and Rogers, New Jersey. Thus the nation, for the first time in its life, speaking through its repres
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
hat the British Government was bound to make full indemnity for all losses caused by the destructive acts of the Alabama. the Manchester Examiner, in noticing her destruction, said:--thus ends the career of one, of the most notorious ships of modern times. Costly as has been her career to Federal commerce, she has been hardly less costly to this country. She has sown a legacy of distrust and of future apprehension on both sides of the Atlantic; and happy will it be both for England and America, if with her, beneath the waters of the channel, may be buried the memory of her career and of the mischief she has done. it seems proper to record here, in anticipation of other transactions of the War, the prominent events in the career of the last of the Confederate pirate ships, and which performed the last acts of hostility against the Republic. She was the Shenandoah, a Clyde (Scotland) built vessel, long and rakish, of seven hundred and ninety tons burden, with an auxiliary engi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
was a powerful ram, called Tennessee, the Tennessee was 209 feet in length, 48 feet beam, with t when, at a quarter before nine o'clock, the Tennessee, which had run some distance up the Bay, camupon it with very little effect. Giving the Tennessee another blow, the Monongahela lost her own b her power upon the sea-giant. She gave the Tennessee a glancing blow and a broadside of 10-inch sw off, and started at full speed to give the Tennessee a deadly stroke by each. At the same time tike. Thus beset, and now badly wounded, the Tennessee hauled down its flag, and flung out a white was virtually destroyed. In that fight the Tennessee had depended more upon its invulnerability agut took 280 prisoners, 190 of them from the Tennessee, and 90 from the Selma. his total loss in thder was regularly served to the guns. so the Tennessee, perhaps one of the most powerful vessels evsible, on the night after the capture of the Tennessee. they fled in such haste, that they left the[3 more...]
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 16
s, were soon taken back to Port land, where the marauders were lodged in prison. later in the year another daring act of piracy was committed. The merchant steamer Chesapeake, plying between New York and Portland, was seized on the 6th of December, by sixteen of her passengers, who proved to be pirates in disguise. They overpowered the officers, killed and threw overboard one of the engineers, and took possession of the vessel. She was soon afterward seized in one of\ the harbors of Nova Scotia, by a National gun-boat, and the pirates were taken to Halifax and handed over to the civil authorities, from whom they were snatched by a sympathizing mob. but she managed to elude them. she would sometimes skim swiftly along the coast of the United States, leaving a track of desolation in her course, and then shoot off to some distant waters. Maffit, the commander of the Florida, was represented by all who knew him as a man lacking all real sense of honor. His conduct in the captur
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
and considered by the Executive Government of the United States, and will be met by liberal terms on substantial and collateral points; and the bearer or bearers thereof shall have safe conduct both ways. This was precisely what the Conspirators and their emissaries wanted. They knew Mr. Lincoln would not consider any other proposition than an unconditional surrender, which they were firmly resolved never to accept voluntarily; At about the time of Mr. Greeley's unofficial mission to Niagara, two other citizens were on a secret peace mission. at Richmond, whither they went clandestinely, without the President's permission, but with his knowledge. The men engaged in the errand were Colonel J. F. Jaques, of the Seventy-third Illinois, and J. R. Gilmore, a civilian, of New York. They were allowed to pass through the Union lines, and at Richmond they obtained an interview, first with Benjamin, Secretary of State, and then with Jefferson Davis. They held a free talk with the lat
Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (search for this): chapter 16
ed by Mallory. He addressed the crew, who were ignorant of their destination until then, and informed them of the character and purpose of the Shenandoah, where-upon only Twenty-three of the eighty men were found willing to become pirates and take the risks of the perilous profession. The remainder returned to Liverpool in the Laurel. the Shenandoah sailed from Madeira to the Southern Ocean, plundering and destroying American vessels whenever opportunity to do so was offered. At Melbourne, Australia, her officers were received with great enthusiasm, and were entertained with receptions, dinners, and balls; and free tickets were given them for travel on the Hobson Bay railroad. Just before they left, these gentlemen indulged in a drunken frolic, and a disgraceful fight with some of the citizens. Then the Shenandoah cruised in the India seas and up the eastern coast of Asia to the Ochosk sea and Behring's Straits, June, 1865. to plunder and destroy the New England whaling fleet
St. Albans, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of co-operating with the leaders of the Peace Faction, in shaping the future policy of the Opposition which was to be announced at that Convention. Also, for carrying out a scheme for exciting hostile feelings between the United States and Great Britain through operations in Canada; They proceeded to organize plundering raids into the border States. One of these, composed of nearly thirty well-armed Confederates, crossed the border into Vermont, Oct. 19. penetrated to the village of St. Albans, robbed the bank of $50,000, stole horses enough to mount the whole party, fired upon unarmed citizens, wounding three (one mortally), and setting fire to one of the hotels. Thirteen of them were arrested on their return to Canada, but were released by a sympathizing judge at Montreal. The British minister (Lord Lyons) did all in his power to bring the offenders to justice, but the Canadian authorities threw over them their sheltering arms. for burning Northern Cities; See note 2, pag
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...