hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 848 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 615 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 439 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 392 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 374 0 Browse Search
George G. Meade 374 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 371 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 355 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 344 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 343 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,860 total hits in 320 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
in a repulse of Longstreet, and a loss to the Nationals of about three hundred men. Among the slain was Lieutenant P. M. Holmes, son of Professor Oliver Wendell Holmes, of Charlestown, Massachusetts. On his breast he wore the badge of the Bunker's Hill Club, on which was engraved the line from Horace,,quoted by General Warren, just before his death on Bunker's Hill--Dulce et decorum est, pro patria circ;mori. --It is sweet and glorious to die for one's country. The Confederate loss was abBunker's Hill--Dulce et decorum est, pro patria circ;mori. --It is sweet and glorious to die for one's country. The Confederate loss was about three hundred and seventy. Taking advantage of this check, Burnside moved on to the shelter of his. intrenchments at Knoxville, the chief of which was an unfinished work on a. hill commanding the southwestern approaches to the town, and afterward called Fort Sanders. Longstreet followed as rapidly as possible. Wheeler and Forrest had failed to seize the height on which works had been thrown up on the south side of the Holston, owing to the gallant bearing of some. of the troops of Gen
Zollicoffer (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he Confederates, and advanced with infantry and artillery to Bull's Gap. Cavalry were then thrown forward to Blue Springs, Oct. 10. where the Confederates, under General Sam. Jones, were in considerable force. After a desultory fight for about twenty-four hours, Oct. 10, 11. the Confederates broke and fled, leaving their dead on the field. They were pursued and struck from time to time by General Shackleford and his cavalry, and driven out of the State. The latter captured a fort at Zollicoffer, burned the long bridge at that place and five other bridges, destroyed a, large amount of rolling stock on the railway, and did not halt until he had penetrated Virginia ten miles beyond Bristol. In the battle of Bluer Springs, and the pursuit, the Nationals lost about one hundred men in killed and wounded. The loss of the Confederates was a little greater. When Shackleford returned from the chase, he took post at Jonesboroa with a part of his command, while another portion, under W
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
rs for the ground to be disputed until he could withdraw all the troops of his left across Chattanooga Creek to the Missionaries' Ridge. That movement was accomplished during the night, and on Wednesday morning Nov. 25, 1863. his whole force was concentrated on the Ridge, and extended heavily to the right, to meet what seemed to be the point chosen for the most formidable assault on his lines, and to protect the railway between the Ridge and Dalton, to which his supplies were sent up from Atlanta. He had placed Lieutenant-General W. J. Hardee in command of his right wing, facing Sherman, and Major-General J. Ac. Breckinridge in command of his left, to confront Hooker. That night he evacuated all of his works at the foot of the Ridge, excepting the rifle-pits, and formed a new line on its top. Hooker moved down from Lookout Mountain on the morning of the 25th, and proceeded to cross Chattanooga Valley in the direction of Rossville. There he was delayed until about two o'clock i
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
the East Tennessee Valley, 156. he invests Knoxville, 157. Sherman's troops move eastward from tis view he had bidden Burnside to hold on to Knoxville with a firm grasp, as long as possible, untiand Kingston roads, about sixteen miles from Knoxville, and there the whole force was rapidly conceho was in immediate command at Knoxville. Knoxville is on the northern bank of the Holston Riverng nearly parallel with the road that enters Knoxville from below, on which, at the time we are con was an unfinished work, afterward known as Fort Sanders, so named in honor of General Sanders, who every hill-top of the vast semicircle around Knoxville, from Temperance Hill to College Hill, is fr house. He was taken to the Lamar House, in Knoxville, and died the next day (Nov. 19), in the bri midnight, in the Presbyterian churchyard at Knoxville, after the celebration of the impressive funforce as to compel him to raise the siege of Knoxville. He sent Colonel Wilson, of his staff, acco[16 more...]
Clinton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
turbulent waters, in cold and storm, they had been crowded b and most cruelly treated. Two or three were in it when Sherman's troops took possession of the town. It seems to have been selected by the Confederates as a place to torture and permanently disable their captives in, as was their practice elsewhere, for they had many other places in the city in which to confine prisoners. Bridge Prison at Jackson. When Sherman had completed his work of destruction, he fell back by way of Clinton, across the Big Black, toward Vicksburg, followed by a great multitude of negroes, of both sexes and all ages. Most of these were the infirm and children, the able-bodied having been sent farther south by their masters. On Sherman's departure, some Confederate troops in the vicinity re-entered Jackson, and burned Bowman's large hotel, because he had given shelter to wounded National soldiers. By Sherman's operations, Vicksburg was secured from all danger of an immediate attack. Grant pr
Athens, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ion was left behind, with orders to report to General McPherson; and a division of the corps of the latter, under General J. E. Smith, already on the way to Memphis, was placed under Sherman's command. The water was low in the Mississippi, and the vessels bearing the last of Sherman's troops did not reach Memphis until the 3d of October. There he received instructions from Halleck to conduct his troops eastward, substantially along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railway, to Athens, in Alabama, and then report by letter to General Rosecrans, at Chattanooga. The troops were moved forward, and on Sunday, the 11th, October. Sherman left Memphis for Corinth, in the cars, with a battalion of the Thirteenth Regulars as an escort. When, at noon, he reached the Colliersville Station, he found a lively time there. About three thousand Confederate cavalry, with eight guns, under General Chalmers, had just attacked the Sixty-sixth Indiana (Colonel D. C. Anthony), stationed there.
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
a, when Blair sent the message to Sherman, at Iuka. Fortunately, Sherman's forethought had caused a supply of means, at this critical moment, for his army to cross the Tennessee River, a movement which the general had expected to be very difficult, with the Confederates in strong force hovering around him. He had requested Admiral Porter to send up gun-boats from Cairo, to assist him in that perilous task. He did so, and on the day when, in obedience to Grant's call, Sherman marched to Eastport, on the river, he found two gun-boats there. Three other vessels soon arrived, and on the 1st of November he crossed and pushed on eastward, Blair covering his rear. He went by way of Fayetteville, Winchester, and Decherd, in Tennessee, and then down to Stevenson and Bridgeport, arriving at the latter place on the 14th. November. On the following day he reported to Grant at Chattanooga, in person. Grant had been somewhat anxious about Burnside's situation, for he could not send him ai
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e past four o'clock in the morning, ended the battle of Wauhatchie. The National loss in this engagement was 416. The entire loss since crossing the Tennessee, 437; of whom 76 were killed, 339 wounded, and 22 were missing. Among the killed was Captain Geary, son of the General. General Green and Colonel Underwood were severely wounded. An amusing incident of this night's battle is related. When it began, about two hundred mules, frightened: by the noise, dashed into the ranks of Wade Hampton's Legion, and produced a great panic. The Confederates. supposed it to be a charge of Hooker's cavalry, and fell back at first in some confusion. The incident inspired a mock-heroic poem, of six stanzas, in imitation of Tennyson's Charge of the six hundred at Balaklava (see note on page 633, volume II.), two verses of which were as follows:-- Forward, the mule brigade! Was there a mule dismayed? Not when the long ears felt All their ropes sundered. Theirs not to make reply-- Theirs
Brandon (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
p, satisfied that he could not hold the place against the host then hemming it in. Under cover of a fog, on the morning of the 13th, July. he made a sortie, but with no other result than the production of some confusion, and a considerable loss of life on his part. Finally, on the 16th, when he knew that Sherman's ammunition had arrived, he prepared for a speedy departure, and that night July 16, 17. he hurried across the Pearl River, burning the bridges behind him, and pushed on through Brandon to Morton. Sherman's loss in the recapture of Jackson, excepting Lauman's troops, was trifling. Johnston reported his loss in Jackson at about 600, and added that on his retreat desertions were frequent. Sherman did not pursue in force beyond the former place, his chief object being to drive off the Confederate army and make Vicksburg secure. For this purpose he broke up the railway at intervals for many miles in every direction, and destroyed every thing in Jackson that could be usefu
Bristol (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nd organized Confederates, who were threatening it at different points. In this business his forces were, for awhile, considerably diffused, and had many lively experiences. Colonel Foster encountered Sept. 21, 1863. a considerable force near Bristol, on the eastern border of the State; and a little later there was a smart but desultory engagement during two days at Blue Springs, not far from Bull's Gap. To that point the Confederates had pressed down. Burnside then had a cavalry brigade a of the State. The latter captured a fort at Zollicoffer, burned the long bridge at that place and five other bridges, destroyed a, large amount of rolling stock on the railway, and did not halt until he had penetrated Virginia ten miles beyond Bristol. In the battle of Bluer Springs, and the pursuit, the Nationals lost about one hundred men in killed and wounded. The loss of the Confederates was a little greater. When Shackleford returned from the chase, he took post at Jonesboroa with a
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...