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Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
mber, 1862; See pages 585 and 536, volume II. the recapture of Galveston See page 594, volume II. and the reoccupation of all Texas, byhim to move into the interior in any direction, or fall back upon Galveston, thus leaving the army free to move upon Mobile. For the purpose away by them, and Houston, only forty miles distant, and flanking Galveston, might have been captured, for General Washburne, with a force eq, to seize and occupy the water passes between the Rio Grande and Galveston. By the aid of steamers obtained on the Rio Grande, troops were eneral Magruder, were concentrated on the coast, between Houston, Galveston, and Indianola. Banks was anxious to follow up his successes by n the opposite side of the bay. The Confederates had withdrawn to Galveston; and all Texas, west of the Colorado, was abandoned by them. With a small additional force Banks might have driven them from Galveston, and secured a permanent military occupation of the State. It remai
France (France) (search for this): chapter 7
ut losing a man himself. The Secretary of the Navy spoke of the affair as the most marked and extraordinary in the service during the year. The Atlanta made another of the list of Confederate iron-clads which the Nationals had recently captured or destroyed. In that brief space of fifteen minutes, the glowing visions of ruin to the National Navy, the raising of the blockade of Wilmington, Charleston, and Mobile, and the speedy recognition of the Confederacy as a nation by Great Britain and France, which the Conspirators and their friends had indulged when contemplating the Atlanta, faded away. Instead of raiding up the Atlantic coast, spreading terror among the inhabitants of seaport towns, she was taken quietly to Philadelphia, and there exhibited for awhile for the benefit of the fund of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon. See page 578, volume I. It is said that the cost of the Atlanta was defrayed entirely by the proceeds of the voluntary sale of their jewelry by the misgu
Missouri (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
er, a Confederate steamer, with about three hundred prisoners. A month later, March 28. the steamer Sam Gaty, on the Missouri River, was captured at Sibley's Landing by a gang of guerrillas, led by George Todd, who committed great atrocities. They wenty-five hundred men. They marched rapidly through Western Missouri to Boonville, See page 540, volume I. on the Missouri River, expecting to be joined in large numbers and gladly assisted by the disloyal inhabitants of that region. But they weven across the Arkansas River. After that there was no fighting of importance in all the region between the Red and Missouri rivers for some. time. Let us now observe what occurred farther southward in the region west of the Mississippi, over wres to disperse the hostile. bands. In June, Sibley moved westward from Fort Snelling, and General Sully went up the Missouri River to co-operate with him. Both fought and drove the savages at different places, and finally scattered them among the w
Sabine Lake (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
that route to be impracticable at that season of the year, so, in the exercise of his discretionary powers, he fitted out an expedition to make a lodgment on Texas soil at Sabine City, at the Sabine Pass. This is the name of the outlet from Sabine Lake into the Gulf of Mexico. Sabine Lake is an expansion of the Sabine River, about five miles from its entrance into the Gulf of Mexico at the southwest extremity of Louisiana, between which State and that of Texas the Sabine River, for a long diSabine Lake is an expansion of the Sabine River, about five miles from its entrance into the Gulf of Mexico at the southwest extremity of Louisiana, between which State and that of Texas the Sabine River, for a long distance, forms the boundary line. There was the terminus of a railway leading into the heart of Eastern Texas, and which was crossed by another leading to Houston, the capital of that State. Banks felt certain that by a successful movement at this point he might speedily concentrate full 15,000 men at Houston, which would place in his hands the control of all the railway communications of Texas, and the most populous part of the State, and enable him to move into the interior in any direction
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
n, mostly mounted, burst suddenly out of Northern Arkansas, and fell upon Springfield, in Missouri,wiftly southward that night, and escaped into Arkansas. With a part of his force he took post at Bahe chief Conspirators and military leaders in Arkansas, he planned a raid into Missouri, having for the St. Francis River, and hurried on toward Arkansas, burning the bridges behind him. McNeil was n Fort Gibson, in the Cherokee country west of Arkansas, was menaced by about three thousand Confedero warrant an attack, so he crossed the river (Arkansas), and seized cattle grazing there, belonging ourians, swept down from Pilot Knob into Northern Arkansas, and at Pocahontas, on the Big Black Rivdition to capture Little Rock, the capital of Arkansas. His forces gathered there at the beginning n. McNeil joined in the chase, which led into Arkansas, the Confederates flying through Huntsville, was now general quiet throughout Missouri and Arkansas. One or two guerrilla bands showed some vital[9 more...]
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
and their friends had indulged when contemplating the Atlanta, faded away. Instead of raiding up the Atlantic coast, spreading terror among the inhabitants of seaport towns, she was taken quietly to Philadelphia, and there exhibited for awhile for the benefit of the fund of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon. See page 578, volume I. It is said that the cost of the Atlanta was defrayed entirely by the proceeds of the voluntary sale of their jewelry by the misguided women of the Confederate States. The example was followed at Charleston, where the building of a gun-boat was begun, with the expectation of money from similar sources, to carry it on. Although the attack on Sumter in April was a failure, the Government was determined to renew the attempt in connection with a land force. Dupont's views were so decidedly in opposition to the measure, because he could anticipate no other result than failure again, that soon after the capture of the Atlanta, when Gillmore was prepa
Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he Army of the Frontier, in place of General Blunt, who had been relieved. There was now general quiet throughout Missouri and Arkansas. One or two guerrilla bands showed some vitality, and late in October Marmaduke made an effort to capture Pine Bluff, the capital of Jefferson County, a post on the south side of the Arkansas River, fifty miles below Little Rock, then in command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas, with three hundred and fifty. men and four guns. Marmaduke marched from Princeton, forty-five miles south of Pine Bluff, with over two thousand men and twelve guns. He advanced October 25. upon the post in three columns, and opened upon the little town with shells and canister-shot. He met unexpected resistance. Clayton had been re-enforced by the First Indiana Cavalry, which made his effective fighting force about six hundred men and nine light guns. He had also employed two hundred negroes in building barricades of cotton-bales in the streets, so that
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ommand. it was difficult to shield them from personal peril. Soon after the attack on Helena, See page 148. the surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and the retreat of Johnston from Jackson, See page 146. by which Grant's army was relieved from pressure, General Frederick Steele was sent to Helena to organize an expedition to capture Little Rock, the capital of Arkansas. His forces gathered there at the beginning of August numbered about six thousand men (including five hundred Indiana and Kansas cavalry), with twenty-two guns. He was soon joined by General Davidson (then operating in Arkansas, under the command of General Hurlbut) with an equal number of men, mostly mounted, with eighteen guns, making his whole force, when he moved from Helena on the 10th of August, about twelve thousand men and forty guns. Davidson and his horsemen took the lead in the march. The White River was crossed at Clarendon, August 17, 1863. when Davidson pushed forward, on its western side
Matagorda Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
rate works there, and captured one hundred prisoners. Corpus Christi was occupied by National troops the same day. Then a force, under General Washburne (then commanding the Thirteenth Army Corps), moved upon Pass Cavallo, at the entrance to Matagorda Bay, where the Confederates had a strong fort, called Esperanza, garrisoned by two thousand men of all arms. It was invested, and, after a sharp action, the Confederates blew up their magazine and fled, Nov. 30. most of the garrison escaping. nd a greater portion of their troops in Texas, commanded by General Magruder, were concentrated on the coast, between Houston, Galveston, and Indianola. Banks was anxious to follow up his successes by moving on Indianola, on the west side of Matagorda Bay, or upon Matagorda, at the mouth of the Colorado. This would have brought him into collision with a greater portion of Magruder's troops. He did not feel strong enough to undertake a task so perilous. He asked for re-enforcements, but they
Canadian (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ing one hundred and fifty of their number dead, and seventy-seven of them prisoners, with a disabled gun and two hundred small-arms. The number of their wounded was estimated at four hundred. Blunt lost seventy-seven men, of whom seventeen were killed. Within an hour after Cooper fled, Cabell came up with his Texans, nearly three thousand strong. He did not think it prudent to attack the victorious Nationals, so during that night he moved rapidly southward, and disappeared beyond the Canadian River, when the Union force returned to Fort Blunt. In the mean time guerrilla bands were becoming exceedingly active in Blunt's rear. One of these, led by Colonel Coffey, went up from Northern Arkansas, and struck Aug. 13. the Sixth Missouri Cavalry, Colonel Catherwood, at Pineville, in Southwestern Missouri; but he was beaten, and driven away with great loss. His retreat was so precipitate, that he left behind him his wagons and supplies, and about two hundred men killed, wounded, and
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