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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he Rio Grande, 223. possession of the Texan harbors, 224. War with the Sioux Indians, 225. There was comparative quiet along the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia for some time after the attack of the iron-clad squadron on Fort Sumter. Dupont kept a careful watch over the movements of the Confederates, especially those on s fired only four more shots. The last one struck the ram point blank, fearfully bent her iron armor, and shivered twelve inches of live-oak planking and five of Georgia pine back of it. One man was killed and seventeen were wounded by the blow, when Webb ran up a white flag. In the space of fifteen minutes after the first shot wort Wagner. In the mean time General Terry, who had made a lodgment on James's. Island, had found lively work to do. Beauregard had received re-enforcements of Georgia troops from Virginia, and these he sent to co-operate with troops on James's Island in an attempt to surprise and capture Terry and his command. At the dawn of t
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
xtremity of Louisiana, between which State and that of Texas the Sabine River, for a long distance, forms the boundary line. There was the terminus of a railway leading into the heart of Eastern Texas, and which was crossed by another leading to Houston, the capital of that State. Banks felt certain that by a successful movement at this point he might speedily concentrate full 15,000 men at Houston, which would place in his hands the control of all the railway communications of Texas, and thHouston, which would place in his hands the control of all the railway communications of Texas, and the most populous part of the State, and enable him to move into the interior in any direction, or fall back upon Galveston, thus leaving the army free to move upon Mobile. For the purpose of making such lodgment, four thousand disciplined troops were placed under the command of General Franklin as leader, who was instructed to land them a few miles below Sabine Pass, and then move directly upon Confederate works, if any were found there and occupied. Admiral Farragut detailed a naval force of f
Arkadelphia (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
crossing of the river by the Nationals, endangering his flank and his line of retreat, caused him to prepare for retiring. Price's line of retreat was on the Arkadelphia road. On that highway he had six hundred wagons parked. Price, with General Holmes and Governor Flanagan, left about four o'clock, after turning over the committle Rock, the city and its military appurtenances were formally surrendered to Davidson by the civil authorities. The troops had all fled in hot haste toward Arkadelphia, on the Washita River. A pursuing column was organized, but the National forces, men and horses, were too much exhausted to chase with vigor, and they followedder. Cabell had avoided Blunt, in order to join and help Price in his defense of Little Rock. He failed to do so, but joined the fugitives in their retreat to Arkadelphia, whence, with Price, he fell back to the Red River. About a month after Blunt took possession of Fort Smith, he was on his way to that post from Kansas, with a
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
after the attack on Helena, See page 148. the surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and the retreat of Johnston from Jackson, See page 146. by which Grant'ss suddenly withdrew from Alexandria, on the Red River, and marched to invest Port Hudson — a service which required nearly all of his available troops--General Dick ers to allow him to capture it, or at least by his menace to draw Banks from Port Hudson, to defend it. Banks's outposts were drawn into Brashear City, where therof the Mississippi at that time, for Banks's forces, released by the fall of Port Hudson, quickly expelled the Confederates from the region eastward of the Atchafalaelled to pass, and the facility with which troops might be brought down from Port Hudson. Before the close of July, Taylor had evacuated Brashear City July 22. (bucontinually annoying vessels at sharp turns in the river, in the vicinity of Port Hudson, and General Herron was sent to Morgansia to suppress these gangs of annoyer
Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
of their jewelry by the misguided women of the Confederate States. The example was followed at Charleston, where the building of a gun-boat was begun, with the expectation of money from similar sources, to carry it on. Although the attack on Sumter in April was a failure, the Government was determined to renew the attempt in connection with a land force. Dupont's views were so decidedly in opposition to the measure, because he could anticipate no other result than failure again, that soon fact that Hagood was repulsed, and that Terry left the island at his leisure for a more important field of action. In his order congratulating his troops for their success on the 10th, Gillmore, after saying they had moved three miles nearer Sumter, frankly declared that their labors were but just begun. While the spires of the rebel city still loom up in the distance, he said, the hardships and privations must be endured before our hopes and expectations can find full fruition in victory.
Princeton, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he Frontier, in place of General Blunt, who had been relieved. There was now general quiet throughout Missouri and Arkansas. One or two guerrilla bands showed some vitality, and late in October Marmaduke made an effort to capture Pine Bluff, the capital of Jefferson County, a post on the south side of the Arkansas River, fifty miles below Little Rock, then in command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas, with three hundred and fifty. men and four guns. Marmaduke marched from Princeton, forty-five miles south of Pine Bluff, with over two thousand men and twelve guns. He advanced October 25. upon the post in three columns, and opened upon the little town with shells and canister-shot. He met unexpected resistance. Clayton had been re-enforced by the First Indiana Cavalry, which made his effective fighting force about six hundred men and nine light guns. He had also employed two hundred negroes in building barricades of cotton-bales in the streets, so that he was wel
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ut one thousand prisoners. But the National loss by sickness was very heavy — not less, probably, than two thousand men. but eight steamers (one of them a powerful gun-boat, just receiving her iron plating) were in flames and beyond recovery when the National troops entered the city. While Steele was engaged in his short campaign, Blunt was in the Indian country, trying to bring the forces of Cabell and the Creek chief, Standwatie, See page 214. to battle. He pressed them closely at Perryville, in the Choctaw Reservation, late in August, and then driving them past Fort Smith, he took peaceable possession of that post, Sept. 1, 1868. and appointed Colonel J. M. Johnson, of the First Arkansas, its commander. Cabell had avoided Blunt, in order to join and help Price in his defense of Little Rock. He failed to do so, but joined the fugitives in their retreat to Arkadelphia, whence, with Price, he fell back to the Red River. About a month after Blunt took possession of Fort Smith
St. Francois River (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Cape Girardeau, on the Mississippi River. With a force of about eight thousand men, in four brigades, known as Price's First Corps of the Trans-Mississippi Department, he pushed rapidly into Missouri, and following the general line of the St. Francis River, reached Fredericton, between Pilot Knob and Cape Girardeau, on the 22d of April. 1868. There he turned quickly to the southeast, and marched on Cape Girardeau; but General John McNeil, who, at Bloomfield, in Stoddard County, had heard of shelled his adversary for awhile, and then again demanded a surrender. McNeil answered with his guns, when the assailant, seeing some armed vessels in the Mississippi coming to the aid of the besieged, beat a retreat April 26. across the St. Francis River, and hurried on toward Arkansas, burning the bridges behind him. McNeil was now ranked by General Vandever, who was of a different temperament, and the pursuit was made so cautiously under his orders, that Marmaduke escaped, after his rear-
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t's views were so decidedly in opposition to the measure, because he could anticipate no other result than failure again, that soon after the capture of the Atlanta, when Gillmore was preparing to move vigorously in a siege of Charleston, Dupont was relieved, and Commodore Foote See page 202, volume II. was appointed his successor. The latter died in New York while on his way to his new post of duty, and Admiral Dahlgren was ordered to the command of the squadron. That officer reached Port Royal on the 6th of July, and heartily sympathizing with Gillmore in his plans, entered vigorously upon the duties assigned him. Gillmore found Folly Island well occupied by National troops under General Vogdes, who had employed them in preparations for future work. Through its almost impenetrable jungles Folly Island is about seven miles in length, and not over one in width at its broadest part. On the west it is separated from James's Island by marshes traversed by Folly River, a narro
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
re McNeil halted, for the more nimble-footed guerrillas had crossed the Arkansas River, and disappeared. McNeil then marched leisurely up the river to Fort Smith, and, in obedience to authority, assumed the command of the Army of the Frontier, in place of General Blunt, who had been relieved. There was now general quiet throughout Missouri and Arkansas. One or two guerrilla bands showed some vitality, and late in October Marmaduke made an effort to capture Pine Bluff, the capital of Jefferson County, a post on the south side of the Arkansas River, fifty miles below Little Rock, then in command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas, with three hundred and fifty. men and four guns. Marmaduke marched from Princeton, forty-five miles south of Pine Bluff, with over two thousand men and twelve guns. He advanced October 25. upon the post in three columns, and opened upon the little town with shells and canister-shot. He met unexpected resistance. Clayton had been re-enforc
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