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Moreau Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
s or delay. The latter of these passages has often been referred to as a model for such operations, and certainly does credit to the general who directed it. But Moreau's bridge equipage having been destroyed during this disastrous campaign, his operations the following year were considerably delayed in preparing a new one, and en day, and in face of the enemy. Undertaken under such circumstances, the enterprise was extremely sanguinary, and at one time very doubtful ; and had it failed, Moreau's army would have been ruined for the campaign. Napoleon's celebrated passage of the Po, at Placentia, shows plainly how important it is for a general to posse; the pontons of course could not be taken across the St. Bernard, but the pontoniers soon found materials on the Po and Tesin for constructing bridge equipages. Moreau's army in the same year profited well by his pontoniers, in the passages of the Inn, the Salza, the Traun, the Alza, &c., and in the pursuit of the Austrian army
Placentia (Canada) (search for this): chapter 13
f the enemy. Undertaken under such circumstances, the enterprise was extremely sanguinary, and at one time very doubtful ; and had it failed, Moreau's army would have been ruined for the campaign. Napoleon's celebrated passage of the Po, at Placentia, shows plainly how important it is for a general to possess the means of crossing rivers. I felt the importance of hastening the enterprise in order not to allow the enemy time to prevent it. But the Po, which is a river as wide and deep as the Rhine, is a barrier difficult to be overcome. We had no means of constructing a bridge, and were obliged to content ourselves with the means of embarkation found at Placentia and its environs. Lannes, chief of brigade, crossed in the first boats, with the advanced guard. The Austrians had only ten squadrons on the other side, and these were easily overcome. The passage was now continued without interruption, but very slowly. If I had had a good ponton-equipage, the fate of the enemy's ar
Ciudad Rodrigo (Spain) (search for this): chapter 13
d from the line, and daily instructed in the practice of sapping, making and laying fascines and gabions, and the construction of batteries, &c. The siege of Ciudad Rodrigo, which immediately followed this organization, was conducted with greater skill and success than any other till nearly the close of the war; and all military 11 -- -- 232 461 Girona, 54 603 62 1299 657 1361 Astorga, 7 91 17 427 98 444 Lerida, 15 316 11 208 331 219 Meguinenza, 34 278 -- -- 312 136 1st Ciudad Rodrigo, 34 441 -- -- 475 1019 Almeida, 34 489 -- -- 523 1019 Tortosa, 43 429 32 381 472 413 Tarragona, 50 681 46 701 731 747 Olivensa, 10 106 -- -- 116 186 1st Badajos, 25 707 41 699 732 740 Tarifa, 12 235 17 148 247 165 Peniscola, 13 138 9 183 151 192 2d Ciudad Rodrigo, 3 12 8 160 15 168 2d Badajos, 9 256 -- -- 265 268 Burgos, 4 124 3 126 128 129 Castio Udiales, 5 68 8 197 73 205 St. Sebastian, 13 248 7 166 261 173 From this table it appears that the
Bayonne (France) (search for this): chapter 13
while those which were retained by Spain and her allies, contributed in an equal degree to hamper and embarrass his operations. Some of these, like Saragossa and Tarragona, with their broken walls and defective armaments, kept the enemy in check some sixty days each, and did much to weaken the French power in the Peninsula. Temporary or field-fortifications also had an important influence here. The lines of Torres-Vedras, the field-works of Ronda, the intrenched camps of the Pyrenees, Bayonne, Toulouse, &c., are examples under this head. In fact, field-works played a most important part in all of Napoleon's wars. We might mention the redoubt of Montenotte, the intrenchments at Milesimo, the batteries of Lobau, the field-defences of Hougomont, La Haye-Sainte, and Papelotte at Waterloo, and numerous other cases equally striking. Just before the battle of Waterloo, Wellington employed some eighteen. thousand peasants and two thousand horses, under the direction of British office
Charleroi (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 13
ll the great sieges and battles of this era a large and continually increasing number of engineers and engineer troops, this orce being gradually augmented as the true principles of war became better understood, and as the wants of the service required. Even in the earliest of these battles we find the engineers taking a prominent and distinguished part. In the war of 1688, twenty-four engineers were killed and wounded at the siege of Philipsbourg, eighteen at Namur, eight at Huy, ten at Charleroi, eight at Ath, thirty at Barcelona, &c. Such losses were good proofs of the usefulness of these officers, and before this war was closed, their number was increased to six hundred; and in 1706 the army contained eight brigades of engineers and four companies of miners. The engineer corps being partially disbanded in the early part of the French Revolution, great difficulty was experienced in reorganizing it and in finding competent men to supply the places of those who had been driven i
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
s and miners, and the necessary fascines and gabions, would have rendered the reduction of the work certain. Colonel Pasley states that only one and a half yards of excavation, per mall, was executed in a whole night, by the untrained troops in the Peninsular war; whereas an instructed sapper can easily accomplish this in twenty minutes, and that it has been done by one of his most skilful sappers, at Chatham, in seven minutes! Soon after this siege a body of engineer troops arrived from England, but their number was insufficient, and Wellington, having learned by sad experience the importance of engineer troops, ordered a body of two hundred volunteers to be detached from the line, and daily instructed in the practice of sapping, making and laying fascines and gabions, and the construction of batteries, &c. The siege of Ciudad Rodrigo, which immediately followed this organization, was conducted with greater skill and success than any other till nearly the close of the war; and al
his arms, while those which were retained by Spain and her allies, contributed in an equal degree to hamper and embarrass his operations. Some of these, like Saragossa and Tarragona, with their broken walls and defective armaments, kept the enemy in check some sixty days each, and did much to weaken the French power in the Peninsula. Temporary or field-fortifications also had an important influence here. The lines of Torres-Vedras, the field-works of Ronda, the intrenched camps of the Pyrenees, Bayonne, Toulouse, &c., are examples under this head. In fact, field-works played a most important part in all of Napoleon's wars. We might mention the redoubt of Montenotte, the intrenchments at Milesimo, the batteries of Lobau, the field-defences of Hougomont, La Haye-Sainte, and Papelotte at Waterloo, and numerous other cases equally striking. Just before the battle of Waterloo, Wellington employed some eighteen. thousand peasants and two thousand horses, under the direction of Briti
Badajos (Amazonas, Brazil) (search for this): chapter 13
lonel J. T. Jones writes in nearly the same terms of the early sieges in the Peninsula, and with respect to the siege of Badajos, adds in express terms, that a body of sappers and miners, and the necessary fascines and gabions, would have rendered t 523 1019 Tortosa, 43 429 32 381 472 413 Tarragona, 50 681 46 701 731 747 Olivensa, 10 106 -- -- 116 186 1st Badajos, 25 707 41 699 732 740 Tarifa, 12 235 17 148 247 165 Peniscola, 13 138 9 183 151 192 2d Ciudad Rodrigo, 3 12 8 160 15 168 2d Badajos, 9 256 -- -- 265 268 Burgos, 4 124 3 126 128 129 Castio Udiales, 5 68 8 197 73 205 St. Sebastian, 13 248 7 166 261 173 From this table it appears that the ratio of the two arms at these sieges, making the compa In the pursuit of Massena, in 1810, it was important to the English to cross the Guadiana, and attack the French before Badajos could be put in a state of defence. Beresford was directed by Wellington to pass this river at Jerumina, where the Port
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ench power in the Peninsula. Temporary or field-fortifications also had an important influence here. The lines of Torres-Vedras, the field-works of Ronda, the intrenched camps of the Pyrenees, Bayonne, Toulouse, &c., are examples under this head. In fact, field-works played a most important part in all of Napoleon's wars. We might mention the redoubt of Montenotte, the intrenchments at Milesimo, the batteries of Lobau, the field-defences of Hougomont, La Haye-Sainte, and Papelotte at Waterloo, and numerous other cases equally striking. Just before the battle of Waterloo, Wellington employed some eighteen. thousand peasants and two thousand horses, under the direction of British officers of engineers. In speaking of these defences, Colonel Pasley says: It may be easily conceived that to have directed such a great body of workmen to proper advantage, by means of a few officers of engineers, would have been impossible, but for the system adopted of subdividing the various works a
Barcino (Spain) (search for this): chapter 13
this era a large and continually increasing number of engineers and engineer troops, this orce being gradually augmented as the true principles of war became better understood, and as the wants of the service required. Even in the earliest of these battles we find the engineers taking a prominent and distinguished part. In the war of 1688, twenty-four engineers were killed and wounded at the siege of Philipsbourg, eighteen at Namur, eight at Huy, ten at Charleroi, eight at Ath, thirty at Barcelona, &c. Such losses were good proofs of the usefulness of these officers, and before this war was closed, their number was increased to six hundred; and in 1706 the army contained eight brigades of engineers and four companies of miners. The engineer corps being partially disbanded in the early part of the French Revolution, great difficulty was experienced in reorganizing it and in finding competent men to supply the places of those who had been driven into exile or sacrificed during the
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