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Browsing named entities in a specific section of H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia.. Search the whole document.

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Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
er allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1812. In 1776 Sir Peter Parker, with a British :fleet of nine vessels, carrying about two hundred and seventy These vessels rated two hundred and fifty-four guns, but the number actually carried is stated to have been two hundred and seventy. guns, attacked Fort Moultrie, in Charleston harbor, which was then armed with only twenty-six guns, and garrisoned by only three hundred and seventy-five regulars and a few militia. In this contest the British were entirely defeated, and lost, in killed and wounded, two hundred and five men, while their whole two hundred and seventy guns killed and wounded only thirty-two men in the fort. Of this trial of strength, which was certainly a fair one, Cooper, in his Naval History, says :--It goes fully to prove the important military posi
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
nts along the; coast. In these two contests with Great Britain, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, and New Orleans, being within reach of the British naval power, and offering the dazzling attractionry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are essentially completed. South Carolina. The works for the defence of Charleston carry some two hundred guns. They are one-half constructed. Georgia. The defences of Savannah carry about two hunis done in most of the other works for the defence of New York, the works for Boston, Newport, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, &c., and an approximation to it is not incompatible with the defence of the broader estuaries, we have but the single harbor of New York; whereas Portland, Portsmouth, Boston, Newport, the Delaware, the Chesapeake, Charleston, Savannah, Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, and numerous other places, are equally open to attack, and therefore must be
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
half constructed. Pennsylvania. The works projected for the ;defence of the Delaware Bay and Philadelphia will carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are not one-quarter built. Maryland and Virginia. Baltimore and Annapolis — these works will carry some two hundred and fifty guns. The works for the Chesapeake Bay will carry about six hundred guns; and those for the Potomac river about eighty guns. These are more than one-half completed. North Carolina. The works at Beaufort and Smithville carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are essentially completed. South Carolina. The works for the defence of Charleston carry some two hundred guns. They are one-half constructed. Georgia. The defences of Savannah carry about two hundred guns, and are nearly three-quarters finished. Florida. The works projected for the defence of St. Augustine, Key West, Tortugas, and Pensacola will carry some eight or nine hundred guns. Those at St. Augustine and Pe
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
hich drove the fleet back upon the coast of France to seek shelter. In 1755, a French fleet of twenty-five sail of the line, and many smaller vessels, sailed from Brest for America. Nine of these soon afterwards returned to France, and the others proceeded to the gulf of St. Lawrence. An English fleet of seventeen sail of the line and some frigates ates had been sent out to intercept them; hut the two fleets passed each other in a thick fog, and all the French vessels except two reached Quebec in safety. In 1759, a French fleet, blockaded in the port of Dunkirk by a British force under Commodore Bogs, seizing upon a favorable opportunity, escaped from the enemy, attacked the coast of Scotland, made a descent upon Carrickfergus, and cruised about till February, 1760, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty-one ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France, and several of these were actually in pursuit. In 1796, when the French att
Harlem Heights (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
fence of our shipping upon the high seas; but it cannot replace fortifications in the protection of our harbors, bays, rivers, arsenals, and. commercial towns. Let us take a case in point. For the defence of New York city, it is deemed highly important that the East River should be closed to the approach of a hostile fleet at least fifteen or twenty miles from the city, so that an army landed there would have to cross the Westchester creek, the Bronx, Harlem river, and the defiles of Harlem heights — obstacles of great importance in a judicious defence. Throg's Neck is the position selected for this purpose; cannon placed there not only command the channel, but, from the windings of the river, sweep it for a great distance above and below. No other position, even in the channel itself, possesses equal advantages. Hence, if we had only naval means of defence, it would be best, were such a thing possible, to place the floating defences themselves on this point. Leaving entirely o
Vincennes (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
United States,44299,336 561797571,972 771821 and 1841 Brandywine,44 Returns incomplete.299,218 121825 Returns incomplete.377,665 951826 and 1838 Potomac,44 Returns incomplete.231,013 021822 Returns incomplete.82,597 031829 and 1835 Concord,20115,325 80182872,796 221832 and 1840 Falmouth,2094,093 271827130,015 431828 and 1837 John Adams,20110,670 691829119,641 931834 and 1837 Boston,2091,973 191825189,264 371826 and 1840 St. Louis,20102,461 951828135,458 751834 and 1839 Vincennes,20111,512 791826178,094 811830 and 1838 Vandalia,2090,977 88182859,181 341832 and 1834 Lexington,20?114,622 35182683,386 521827 and 1837 Warren,20?99,410 011826152,596 031830 and 1838 Fairfield,20100,490 35182665,918 261831 and 1837 Natches, Broken up in 1840.20?106,232 191827129,969 801829 and 1836 Boxer,1030,697 88183128,780 481834 and 1840 Enterprise,1027,938 63183120,716 591834 and 1840 Grampus,1023,627 42182196,086 361825 and 1840 Dolphin,1038,522 62183615,013 351839 and 1
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ish loss was twenty killed, and more than fifty wounded. Ours was only two killed and six wounded. Perkins says two killed and six wounded. Holmes says six wounded, but makes no mention of any killed. The fleet sent to the attack of Baltimore, in 1814, consisted of forty sail, the largest of which were ships of the line, carrying an army of over six thousand combatants. The troops were landed at North Point, while sixteen of the bomb-vessels and frigates approached within reach of Fort McHenry, and commenced a bombardment which lasted twenty-five hours. During this attack, the enemy threw fifteen hundred shells, four hundred of which exploded within the walls of the fort, but without making any impression on either the strength of the work or the garrison, and the British were compelled to retire with much loss. In 1815, a squadron of British ships, stationed off the mouths of the Mississippi, for the purpose of a blockade ascended the river as high as Fort St. Philip, which
Dunkirk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
n 1755, a French fleet of twenty-five sail of the line, and many smaller vessels, sailed from Brest for America. Nine of these soon afterwards returned to France, and the others proceeded to the gulf of St. Lawrence. An English fleet of seventeen sail of the line and some frigates ates had been sent out to intercept them; hut the two fleets passed each other in a thick fog, and all the French vessels except two reached Quebec in safety. In 1759, a French fleet, blockaded in the port of Dunkirk by a British force under Commodore Bogs, seizing upon a favorable opportunity, escaped from the enemy, attacked the coast of Scotland, made a descent upon Carrickfergus, and cruised about till February, 1760, without meeting a single British vessel, although sixty-one ships of the line were then stationed upon the coasts of England and France, and several of these were actually in pursuit. In 1796, when the French attempted to throw the army of Hoche into Ireland, the most strenuous effo
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ons on the soil of her allies, in Portugal and Belgium, the fall of Napoleon crowned the glory of their achievements. Let us now examine the several British naval attacks on our own forts, in the wars of the Revolution and of 1812. In 1776 Sir Peter Parker, with a British :fleet of nine vessels, carrying about two hundred and seventy These vessels rated two hundred and fifty-four guns, but the number actually carried is stated to have been two hundred and seventy. guns, attacked Fort Moultrie, in Charleston harbor, which was then armed with only twenty-six guns, and garrisoned by only three hundred and seventy-five regulars and a few militia. In this contest the British were entirely defeated, and lost, in killed and wounded, two hundred and five men, while their whole two hundred and seventy guns killed and wounded only thirty-two men in the fort. Of this trial of strength, which was certainly a fair one, Cooper, in his Naval History, says :--It goes fully to prove the imp
Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 8
impress of his footsteps on the surface of the ocean — it may be ell to consult experience. The naval power of Spain under Philip II. was almost unlimited. With the treasures of India and America at his command, the fitting out of a fleet of one hundred and fifty or two hundred sail, to invade another country, was no very gigantic operation. Nevertheless, this naval force was of but little avail as a coast defence. Its efficiency for this purpose was well tested in 1596. England and Holland attacked Cadiz with a combined fleet of one hundred and seventy ships, which entered the Bay of Cadiz without, on its approach to their coast, being once seen by the Spanish navy. This same squadron, on its return to England, passed along a great portion of the Spanish coast without ever meeting with the slightest opposition from the innumerable Spanish floating defences. In 1744, a French fleet of twenty ships, and a land force of twenty-two thousand men, sailed from Brest to the Engli
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