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Browsing named entities in a specific section of H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia.. Search the whole document.

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Stonington (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
a little more than a hundred men, unprovided alike with furnaces for heating shot, or casements to cover themselves from rockets and shells. Nevertheless, the enemy was completely repulsed; one of his largest ships was entirely destroyed, and 85 men were killed and wounded on board the other; while our loss was only eight or nine. Here a naval force of five to one was repelled by the land-battery. Again, in 1814, a barbette battery of one four-pounder and two eighteen-pounder guns at Stonington, repelled a British fleet of one hundred and thirty-four guns. During the engagement the Americans exhausted their ammunition, and spiked their eighteen-pounders, arid only one of them was afterwards used. Two of the enemy's ships, carrying one hundred and twelve guus, were engaged during the whole time of attack, and during much of this time bombarded the town from a position beyond reach of the land-battery. They were entirely too far off for the four-pounder gun to be of any use. Sup
New London Harbor (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
es of Portsmouth and the vicinity, about two hundred guns. These works are also only partly built. Massachusetts. Projected works east of Boston, carrying about sixty guns These are not yet commenced. Works for defence of Boston Harbor carry about five hundred guns. These are nearly three-quarters completed. Those of New Bedford harbor carry fifty guns: not yet begun. Rhode Island. Newport harbor,--works carry about five hundred guns, nearly completed. Connecticut. New London harbor, New Haven, and the Connecticut river. The first of these nearly completed ; the two latter not yet begun. New York. The works projected for the defence of New York harbor are estimated to carry about one thousand guns. These works are not yet one-half constructed. Pennsylvania. The works projected for the ;defence of the Delaware Bay and Philadelphia will carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are not one-quarter built. Maryland and Virginia. Baltimore and
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
tteries, carrying about one hundred and fifty guns. These are only partly built. New Hampshire. Defenses of Portsmouth and the vicinity, about two hundred guns. These works are also only partly built. Massachusetts. Projected works east of Boston, carrying about sixty guns These are not yet commenced. Works for defence of Boston Harbor carry about five hundred guns. These are nearly three-quarters completed. Those of New Bedford harbor carry fifty guns: not yet begun. Rhode Island. Newport harbor,--works carry about five hundred guns, nearly completed. Connecticut. New London harbor, New Haven, and the Connecticut river. The first of these nearly completed ; the two latter not yet begun. New York. The works projected for the defence of New York harbor are estimated to carry about one thousand guns. These works are not yet one-half constructed. Pennsylvania. The works projected for the ;defence of the Delaware Bay and Philadelphia will carry abou
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
each of Fort McHenry, and commenced a bombardment which lasted twenty-five hours. During this attack, the enemy threw fifteen hundred shells, four hundred of which exploded within the walls of the fort, but without making any impression on either the strength of the work or the garrison, and the British were compelled to retire with much loss. In 1815, a squadron of British ships, stationed off the mouths of the Mississippi, for the purpose of a blockade ascended the river as high as Fort St. Philip, which is a small work capable of an armament of only twenty guns in all. A heavy fire of shot and shells was continued with but few and short pauses. for nine days and nights, but making no impression either on the fort or garrison, they retreated to their former position at the mouth of the river. There is but a single instance in the war of 1812, where the enemy's vessels succeeded in reducing a fort; and this has sometimes been alluded to, by persons ignorant of the real facts o
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
othing has yet been done to these works. Next Portland, with works carrying about forty or fifty guns, and Fort Penobscot and batteries, carrying about one hundred and fifty guns. These are only partly built. New Hampshire. Defenses of Portsmouth and the vicinity, about two hundred guns. These works are also only partly built. Massachusetts. Projected works east of Boston, carrying about sixty guns These are not yet commenced. Works for defence of Boston Harbor carry about fivestill more uncertain chance of keeping him there; the escape of a single vessel being sufficient to cause the loss of our harbor.” These remarks are based upon the supposition that we have but the single harbor of New York; whereas Portland, Portsmouth, Boston, Newport, the Delaware, the Chesapeake, Charleston, Savannah, Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, and numerous other places, are equally open to attack, and therefore must be equally defended, for we know not to which the enemy will direct
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
r and a few exposed points along the; coast. In these two contests with Great Britain, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, and New Orleans, being within reach of the British naval power, and offeringhiladelphia will carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are not one-quarter built. Maryland and Virginia. Baltimore and Annapolis — these works will carry some two hundred and fifty guns. The works for the Chesapeake Bay will carry abilled and six wounded. Holmes says six wounded, but makes no mention of any killed. The fleet sent to the attack of Baltimore, in 1814, consisted of forty sail, the largest of which were ships of the line, carrying an army of over six thousand cannels, as is done in most of the other works for the defence of New York, the works for Boston, Newport, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, &c., and an approximation to it is not incompatible with the defence of the broader
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
imore and Annapolis — these works will carry some two hundred and fifty guns. The works for the Chesapeake Bay will carry about six hundred guns; and those for the Potomac river about eighty guns. These are more than one-half completed. North Carolina. The works at Beaufort and Smithville carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are essentially completed. South Carolina. The works for the defence of Charleston carry some two hundred guns. They are one-half constructed. Georgia. The defences of Savannah carry about two hundred guns, and are nearly three-quarters finished. Florida. The works projected for the defence of St. Augustine, Key West, Tortugas, and Pensacola will carry some eight or nine hundred guns. Those at St. Augustine and Pensacola are essentially completed, but those at Key West and Tortugas are barely begun. Alabama. The works for the defence of Mobile will carry about one hundred and sixty guns. These are nearly constructed. Loui
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
eral Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre The principal attacks which we have had to sustain, either as colonies or states, from civilized foes, have come from Canada. As colonies we were continually encountering difficulties and dangers from the French possessions. In the war of the Revolution, it being one of national emancipation, the military operations were more general throughout the several states ; bnaval power, and offering the dazzling attraction of rich booty, have each been subjected to powerful assaults. Similar attacks will undoubtedly be made in any future war with England. An attempt at permanent lodgment would be based either on Canada or a servile insurrection in the southern states. The former project, in a military point of view, offers the greatest advantages, but most probably the latter would also be resorted to for effecting a diversion, if nothing more. But for inflic
Brest (France) (search for this): chapter 8
h floating defences. In 1744, a French fleet of twenty ships, and a land force of twenty-two thousand men, sailed from Brest to the English coast, without meeting with any opposition from the superior British fleet which had been sent out, under France to seek shelter. In 1755, a French fleet of twenty-five sail of the line, and many smaller vessels, sailed from Brest for America. Nine of these soon afterwards returned to France, and the others proceeded to the gulf of St. Lawrence. Anat Spithead; Sir Roger Curtis, with a smaller force, was cruising to the westward; Vice-admiral Colpoys was stationed off Brest, with thirteen sail of the line; and Sir Edward Pellew (afterwards Lord Exmouth) watched the harbor, with a small squadrofleet was eight days on the passage, and three more in landing the troops; and most of the vessels might have returned to Brest III safety, had it not been for disasters by storms, for only one of their whole number was intercepted by the vast naval
J. B. Warren (search for this): chapter 8
Wales. Again, in 1798, the immense British naval force failed to prevent the landing of General Humbert's army in the bay of Killala; and, in the latter part of the same year, a French squadron of nine vessels and three thousand men escaped Sir J. B. Warren's squadron, and safely reached the coast of Ireland. As a further illustration, we quote from the report of the Board of National Defence in 1839. The Toulon fleet, in 1798, consisting of about twenty sail of the line and twenty smaller oston,2091,973 191825189,264 371826 and 1840 St. Louis,20102,461 951828135,458 751834 and 1839 Vincennes,20111,512 791826178,094 811830 and 1838 Vandalia,2090,977 88182859,181 341832 and 1834 Lexington,20?114,622 35182683,386 521827 and 1837 Warren,20?99,410 011826152,596 031830 and 1838 Fairfield,20100,490 35182665,918 261831 and 1837 Natches, Broken up in 1840.20?106,232 191827129,969 801829 and 1836 Boxer,1030,697 88183128,780 481834 and 1840 Enterprise,1027,938 63183120,716 59183
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