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Browsing named entities in a specific section of H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia.. Search the whole document.

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Algerine (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
and sailed beyond their reach. The ships retired-1st, because they had become much injured, and their ammuninition nearly exhausted; 2d, in order to escape from a position so hazardous in case of a storm; and 3d, to get beyond the reach of the Algerine batteries. Lord Exmouth himself gives these as his reasons for the retreat, and says, the land wind saved me many a gallant fellow. And Vice-admiral Von de Capellan, in his report of the battle, gives the same opinion: in this retreat, says hestruction of a few second-rate towns, even when practicable, it is a mean, unworthy species of warfare, by which nothing was ever gained. The severe loss sustained before Algiers must also be taken into account, because it was inflicted by mere Algerine artillery, and was much inferior to what may be expected from a contest maintained against batteries manned with soldiers instructed by officers of skill and science, not only in working the guns, but in the endless duty of detail necessary for
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
elphia will carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are not one-quarter built. Maryland and Virginia. Baltimore and Annapolis — these works will carry some two hundred and fifty guns. The works for the Chesapeake Bay will carry about six hundred guns; and those for the Potomac river about eighty guns. These are more than one-half completed. North Carolina. The works at Beaufort and Smithville carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are essentially completed. South Carolina. The works for the defence of Charleston carry some two hundred guns. They are one-half constructed. Georgia. The defences of Savannah carry about two hundred guns, and are nearly three-quarters finished. Florida. The works projected for the defence of St. Augustine, Key West, Tortugas, and Pensacola will carry some eight or nine hundred guns. Those at St. Augustine and Pensacola are essentially completed, but those at Key West and Tortugas are barely begun. Alabama. Th
Sweden (Sweden) (search for this): chapter 8
s of Cronenberg and Elsinore were lined with one hundred pieces of cannon and. mortars; but the Swedish battery had been much neglected, and then mounted only six guns. Nevertheless, the British adm fired upon. It must be remembered that at this time England was at peace with both Denmark and Sweden, and that no just cause of war existed. Hence, the admiral inferred that the commanders of thesat, even had it been possible, Denmark would not have consented to their doing so, for fear that Sweden would renew her old claim to one half of the rich duties levied by Denmark on all ships passing at season, a few days would have been sufficient for placing a hundred guns in battery, and that Sweden had much more time than was requisite. And with a hundred guns on each side of the channel, serg and Elsinore. 3d. It is the opinion of Napoleon and the best English writers, that if the Swedish battery had been put in order, and acted in concert with the Danish works, they might have so d
Key West (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
rleston carry some two hundred guns. They are one-half constructed. Georgia. The defences of Savannah carry about two hundred guns, and are nearly three-quarters finished. Florida. The works projected for the defence of St. Augustine, Key West, Tortugas, and Pensacola will carry some eight or nine hundred guns. Those at St. Augustine and Pensacola are essentially completed, but those at Key West and Tortugas are barely begun. Alabama. The works for the defence of Mobile will carKey West and Tortugas are barely begun. Alabama. The works for the defence of Mobile will carry about one hundred and sixty guns. These are nearly constructed. Louisiana. The works for the defence of New Orleans will carry some two hundred and fifty or three hundred guns; they are nearly completed. The works north of the Chesapeake cost about three thousand dollars per gun; those south of that point about six thousand dollars per gun. This difference in cost is due in part to the character of the soil on which the fortifications are built, and in part to the high prices paid in
Leghorn (Italy) (search for this): chapter 8
one hundred and fifty guns and about thirteen hundred men. And what effects were produced by this strange combat? The attacking force lost thirty-seven men killed and wounded, the eighty-gun ship was much disabled, while the fort and garrison escaped entirely unharmed! What could not be effected by force was afterwards obtained by negotiation. In 1808 a French land-battery of only three guns, near Fort Trinidad, drove off an English seventy-four-gun ship, and a bomb-vessel. In 1813 Leghorn, whose defences were of a very mediocre character, and whose garrison at that time was exceedingly weak, was attacked by an English squadron of six ships, carrying over three hundred guns, and a land force of one thousand troops. The whole attempt was a perfect failure. In 1814, when the English advanced against Antwerp, says Colonel Mitchell, an English historian, Fort Frederick, a small work of only two guns, was established in a bend of the Polder Dyke, at some distance below Lillo.
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ampshire. Defenses of Portsmouth and the vicinity, about two hundred guns. These works are also only partly built. Massachusetts. Projected works east of Boston, carrying about sixty guns These are not yet commenced. Works for defence of Boston Harbor carry about five hundred guns. These are nearly three-quarters completed. Those of New Bedford harbor carry fifty guns: not yet begun. Rhode Island. Newport harbor,--works carry about five hundred guns, nearly completed. Connecticut. New London harbor, New Haven, and the Connecticut river. The first of these nearly completed ; the two latter not yet begun. New York. The works projected for the defence of New York harbor are estimated to carry about one thousand guns. These works are not yet one-half constructed. Pennsylvania. The works projected for the ;defence of the Delaware Bay and Philadelphia will carry about one hundred and fifty guns. They are not one-quarter built. Maryland and Virginia.
Diamond Rock (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
inequality of nearly seventeen to one, the little battery compelled the superior naval force to retreat with great loss. Shortly after this, the French and Spanish fleets attacked the same English squadron with a force of nearly three to one, but met with a most signal defeat; whereas with a land-battery of only one to seventeen, the same party had been victorious. What proof can be more decisive of the superiority of guns on shore over those afloat! In 1803 the English garrison of Diamond Rock, near Port Royal Bay, with only one hundred men and some fifteen guns, repelled a French squadron of two seventy-four-gun ships, a frigate, and a brig, assisted by a land attack of two hundred troops. There was not a single man killed or wounded in the redoubt, while the French lost fifty men! The place was afterwards reduced by famine. In 1806 a French battery on Cape Licosa, of only two guns and a garrison of twenty-five men, resisted the attacks of a British eighty-gun ship and tw
Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ell here to point out, in very general terms, the positions and character of these works, mentioning only such as have been completed, or are now in course of construction, and such as are intended to be built as soon as Congress shall grant the requisite funds. There are other works projected for some future period, but as they do not belong to the class required for immediate use, they will not be referred to. Maine. Beginning at the northeastern extremity of our coast, we have, for Eastport and Wiscasset, projected works estimated to carry about fifty guns. Nothing has yet been done to these works. Next Portland, with works carrying about forty or fifty guns, and Fort Penobscot and batteries, carrying about one hundred and fifty guns. These are only partly built. New Hampshire. Defenses of Portsmouth and the vicinity, about two hundred guns. These works are also only partly built. Massachusetts. Projected works east of Boston, carrying about sixty guns These ar
America (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
e get ho glimpse and hear no tidings, and seeing the impress of his footsteps on the surface of the ocean — it may be ell to consult experience. The naval power of Spain under Philip II. was almost unlimited. With the treasures of India and America at his command, the fitting out of a fleet of one hundred and fifty or two hundred sail, to invade another country, was no very gigantic operation. Nevertheless, this naval force was of but little avail as a coast defence. Its efficiency for tintercept them. The landing of the troops was prevented by a storm, which drove the fleet back upon the coast of France to seek shelter. In 1755, a French fleet of twenty-five sail of the line, and many smaller vessels, sailed from Brest for America. Nine of these soon afterwards returned to France, and the others proceeded to the gulf of St. Lawrence. An English fleet of seventeen sail of the line and some frigates ates had been sent out to intercept them; hut the two fleets passed each
Trafalgar (Spain) (search for this): chapter 8
nemy himself, and hear nothing of them from merchant vessels, we may judge of the probability of waylaying our adversary on the broad Atlantic. The escape of another Toulon fleet in 1805; the long search for them in the Mediterranean by the same able officer; the pursuit in the West Indies; their evasion of him among the islands; the return to Europe; his vain efforts subsequently, along the coast of Portugal, in the bay of Biscay, and off the English channel; and the meeting at last at Trafalgar, brought about only because the combined fleets, trusting to the superiority that the accession of several reinforcements had given, were willing to try the issue of a battle — these are instances, of the many that might be cited, to show how small is the probability of encountering upon the ocean an enemy who desires to avoid a meeting, and how little the most untiring zeal, the most restless activity, the most exalted professional skill and judgment, can do to lessen the adverse chances.
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