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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley).

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James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 1
lue if it did not, in some respects, illustrate one of the most extraordinary changes in the opinions of a great people which history records. The election of Mr. Buchanan seemed definitely to indicate not merely the perpetuity of Human Slavery in this Republic, but the acquiescence of the people of the Free States, or of a majoreholder having any measure at heart, needed only to cry out that, if denied, he intended to secede, to carry his point with marvelous and triumphant celerity. Mr. Buchanan was a Northern man, but although he is dead, the sad and mortifying truth must be spoken: he had so disciplined himself in this school of what may be called unning. He was no better and no worse perhaps than his friends; but he had the misfortune to be their representative. To the last moment of his administration, Mr. Buchanan was faithful to the traditions of his party; and while the bugle call of sedition was sounding through half the Republic — while its flag was defended by a han
toral pleasures of the plantation, and the patriarchal felicities of the Blacks. There was the lawyer pleading that, in certain cases, the Habeas Corpus is good for nothing. And under all there were crowds of prejudiced and unreasoning men of every social grade, from the highest to the lowest, who denounced every objector to this condition of affairs as a destructive and a radical, and who thought a flourishing trade with the South worth all the morality ever propounded, from Plutarch to Dr. Paley. It would, doubtless, have been easier — I know it would often have been thought in better taste — to have taken a low and despairing view of public affairs, and sadly to have predicted the second coming of chaos. But, partly perhaps from a constitutional habit, I was led to consider serious subjects cheerfully; although I hardly ever made a jest upon the subject of Slavery without a feeling of self-rebuke. But it must be remembered that the gentlemen upon the other side were already
t in better taste — to have taken a low and despairing view of public affairs, and sadly to have predicted the second coming of chaos. But, partly perhaps from a constitutional habit, I was led to consider serious subjects cheerfully; although I hardly ever made a jest upon the subject of Slavery without a feeling of self-rebuke. But it must be remembered that the gentlemen upon the other side were already in the field as mourners, and had pretty much monopolized the business of groaning. Nestor was with them, and so was Heraclitus; and if the country was to be saved by crying, they were clearly designed to be the saviours. They were angry often enough at finding serious subjects lightly treated, and they did not relish a style which sometimes made havoc of their dignity; but, upon the other hand, it may be said that there were those who did not at all relish their mournful methods, and who could not see that they were taking any very promising way to avert the calamities which the
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
men we may not be permitted to judge, but surely there is no law which forbids us to make a conscientious estimate of their heads; and he who, upon the strength of two or three little texts-upon the fact of the existence of Slavery among the Jews and in the Roman Empire-upon that small portion of history which records the curse upon Canaan, could assert, and in pulpit, newspaper, review, and volume, persist in the assertion that the Slavery of Four Millions of Men, in the Republic of the United States, in the year of Christianity One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty,--that such Slavery, utterly modern in its theory and practice, was a thing to be not merely justified, but applauded and defended in the pulpit-he, I say, who could make this large demand upon the faith of his neighbors, must have had one of those narrow and monkish natures which may be capable of a certain degree of usefulness in drilling battalions of neophytes, but which are equally incapable of lofty views or elevated
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d together, that against all natural rules, a peculiar and disagreeable smell would be noticed in the atmosphere, and that it would even be perceptible in Heaven. I do not know that the Pro-Slavery Politician was a whit less absurd; but he had the advantage of confining his argumentation to matters of earth and sense, and of uttering low things from a lower standpoint. He did not pass the flaming bounds of time and space ; but restricting himself to the somewhat different atmosphere of Washington, he was content to limit human progress by existing enactments, and to plead precedent against the piteous appeals of those who sued for redress in forma pauperis. He had more than the respect of the proverb for what-ever is. He not only believed it to be right, but he proclaimed it, at the top of his voice, to be immutable. Whatever the Slaveholder asked for, he was ready to accord; and naturally the Slaveholder soon learned that he could not ask for too much. The position of the Pro
Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
t many unquestionably were left to believe that the Institution was Divine in its origin, and that it was still authorized by the Divine sanction. The hearts of men we may not be permitted to judge, but surely there is no law which forbids us to make a conscientious estimate of their heads; and he who, upon the strength of two or three little texts-upon the fact of the existence of Slavery among the Jews and in the Roman Empire-upon that small portion of history which records the curse upon Canaan, could assert, and in pulpit, newspaper, review, and volume, persist in the assertion that the Slavery of Four Millions of Men, in the Republic of the United States, in the year of Christianity One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty,--that such Slavery, utterly modern in its theory and practice, was a thing to be not merely justified, but applauded and defended in the pulpit-he, I say, who could make this large demand upon the faith of his neighbors, must have had one of those narrow and monki
ite, and often advanced the most indefensible opinions in language of more than sophomorical elegance. When at his worst in public policy, he was most dulcet in his demeanor; and he vetoed necessary measures with commendable suavity. Mr. Buchanan, we regret to observe, is rather snappish, and too much inclined to snub the humble petitioners who approach the throne. The different characters of the last and of the present President may receive illustration from the following facts: Last January, when Mr. Pierce was about to retire from the presidential glees and glooms, he received from the American Bible Society a copy of the Holy Scriptures, as a token of their high regard for the office which he held. We do not know to whom the Society could more appropriately have made the donation than to one who, during his administration of public affairs, was singularly unmindful of many of the teachings of The Book. Uncharitable people might say that Mr. Pierce's case was like that of t
must be confessed, and not worth half so much as those big cheeses which it used to be the fashion to present to presidents. But the donors gave all; they could no more; though poor the offering was. That Mr. Buchanan would have found a study of the paper profitable, we confidently aver. But instead of devoting himself to it like a good scholar, he ungratefully wrote to the Connecticut gentlemen a letter, the burthen of which was, Thank you for nothing! --a letter the very opposite of what may be called genial, and as puckery as a persimmon before the frost. Some writer (French, of course) says that he prefers bad morals to bad manners; and without going to that extreme, we must say that suavity in a public officer is by no means to be despised. The mistress of the White House is said to be a well-bred young woman; and we advise Mr. Buchanan to entrust his more delicate correspondence to her. Female tact will amply atone for any lack of political knowledge. October 10, 1857.
d, in by no means a heart-broken state, with Mr. Pierce, and settled ourselves to bear as best we min the placidity of old age. On the contrary, Mr. Pierce was particularly polite, and often advanced m the following facts: Last January, when Mr. Pierce was about to retire from the presidential glhe Book. Uncharitable people might say that Mr. Pierce's case was like that of the man who, upon beand we hope that it will prove profitable to Mr. Pierce. A suspicious and touchy man, however, uponvolume, and of his lack of a copy of it. But Mr. Pierce behaved in no such ungracious way. On the cotions there is no union of Church and State, Mr. Pierce informs us that Christianity animates our nad will depend upon what kind of Christianity Mr. Pierce refers to. The truth is that there are severwhich particular kind they are alluding. If Mr. Pierce in the above elegant extract referred to thes theft of the earnings of the poor. But if Mr. Pierce refers to that other Christianity of older d
James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 10
with Mr. Pierce, and settled ourselves to bear as best we might the reign of Mr. Buchanan, the general opinion was that we had made a change for the better. There waenerous and ungracious things. In fact, despite the little Ostend escapade, Mr. Buchanan ran very much upon the merits of his respectability and figured in the multiin his demeanor; and he vetoed necessary measures with commendable suavity. Mr. Buchanan, we regret to observe, is rather snappish, and too much inclined to snub theh all will admit to be remarkably civil. How different the style in which Mr. Buchanan received his present! Certain gentlemen in Connecticut remarking with pain the donors gave all; they could no more; though poor the offering was. That Mr. Buchanan would have found a study of the paper profitable, we confidently aver. But ress of the White House is said to be a well-bred young woman; and we advise Mr. Buchanan to entrust his more delicate correspondence to her. Female tact will amply a
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