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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 61
which the members are mostly in the church-yard. All hope of a modern miracle being therefore absurd, it is sagaciously proposed, by one of the newspapers in this city, to reconstruct the Republican party--to purge it, to wash it, to rehabilitate it, to make it respectable, by casting out what are called its radical elements. The volunteer washerwoman on this occasion has kindly printed her soap-and-water programme. With eminent prudence, she condescends to allow the President of the United States to remain in the party. Also, all other persons, public or private, who will give their solemn word to refrain from rampant radicalism --couchant radicalism being, we suppose, permitted. Only a conservative policy is to be tolerated; and it is anticipated that the radical, finding this intolerable, will become outrageous and bolt, And leave the spoils to Crittenden and me. Of course, after this radical bolting, the Republican party will be the natural nucleus for all the conser
Brigham Young (search for this): chapter 61
affered for and cheapened by cliques? stuffed full of other men's opinions? completely exenterated as to their own? Ah! but we are all to be graciously allowed the Chicago Platform! We should much like to know who has asked for anything else — except, indeed, Mr. Crittenden, who, in the new arrangement, is to be allowed, we presume, a private platform of his own. And if he, why not other people who may fall into the regenerated ranks? Why not insert a polygamical plank, and rope in Brigham Young! Really, since these gentlemen are to take possession of us, of our souls, our bodies, our President, our Congress, our constituencies, our clubs, and our newspapers, it behooves us to be enquiring, with all due civility, what we are to believe after all the arrangements have been completed? Will the reconstructors leave us our name? or will they filch it from us? or will they call themselves the Reformed Republican Party? Has not that word, Reformed, an ugly sound? to say nothing
Crittenden (search for this): chapter 61
vative policy is to be tolerated; and it is anticipated that the radical, finding this intolerable, will become outrageous and bolt, And leave the spoils to Crittenden and me. Of course, after this radical bolting, the Republican party will be the natural nucleus for all the conservative men in the country. A respectable o their own? Ah! but we are all to be graciously allowed the Chicago Platform! We should much like to know who has asked for anything else — except, indeed, Mr. Crittenden, who, in the new arrangement, is to be allowed, we presume, a private platform of his own. And if he, why not other people who may fall into the regenerated ll themselves the Reformed Republican Party? Has not that word, Reformed, an ugly sound? to say nothing of that other word, Republican? Pray, how will dear Mr. Crittenden like that? The whole scheme, it must be allowed, argues great kindness of nature in the schemers. We are not only to welcome home the Prodigal Son, but we