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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). Search the whole document.

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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 68
n or peace, if schemes of Confiscation, Emancipation, and other unconstitutional measures, shall be enacted under the form of laws. The thirty-five gentlemen voted to print this rather than else thrilling opinion, for the benefit of mankind in general, and then the Thirty-five gentlemen broke camp and went back to their boarding-houses. There has n't been. anything politically more portentous since the Three Tailors of Tooley street issued their Proclamation, beginning, We, the people of England. Considering the great importance of this demonstration, it is to be regretted that Conservators did not, by some address more enlarged than a resolution, let us know by what process of reasoning they arrived at the conclusion that the Abolition of Slavery would forever bar the restoration of the Union. If we were inclined to be hypercritical, we might ask why these Representatives allow themselves to talk of the restoration of the Union at all? Do they consider that by any constitutio
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 68
demonstration, it is to be regretted that Conservators did not, by some address more enlarged than a resolution, let us know by what process of reasoning they arrived at the conclusion that the Abolition of Slavery would forever bar the restoration of the Union. If we were inclined to be hypercritical, we might ask why these Representatives allow themselves to talk of the restoration of the Union at all? Do they consider that by any constitutional theory the Union is abolished? that South Carolina could abolish it? that Jefferson Davis, by any villainy, could destroy it in any sense? Because, before a thing can be restored, if we know anything of language or of logic, it must first be lost. The truth is, that the Thirty-five, in their eagerness to construct a pretty series of resolutions, have done that which has been esteemed impossible — they have fairly bitten off their own noses. Eight into the jaws of a solecism, as we shall prove, tumbled the Thirty-five. If the Union ca
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 68
we are as willing to pardon injuries as our neighbors are; but at the risk of being, regarded as revengeful, we must admit our inability to keep pace with that eminent Professor of Forgiveness and Forgetfulness, Mr. Richardson of Illinois, who said in the Conserved Caucus, that peace can only be restored by saying to the masses at the South, You have done wrong! Lay down your arms and you shall not be touched. But should Congress decide upon this emollient course, let Richardson be the United States. Embassador to the camps of the Rebels! Let him enter their lines, blowing the most assuasive tunes upon the mildest of trumpets! Let him, while gentle smiles illumine his countenance, say tenderly to the Confederate armies, You have done wrong! Lay down your arms, and you shall not be touched! We can imagine his reception. Even while he blandly speaks, bowie-knives flash, revolvers are aimed at his sacred person, and an extemporized halter dangles aloft. Jefferson Davis and staff
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 68
We hope that we are as willing to pardon injuries as our neighbors are; but at the risk of being, regarded as revengeful, we must admit our inability to keep pace with that eminent Professor of Forgiveness and Forgetfulness, Mr. Richardson of Illinois, who said in the Conserved Caucus, that peace can only be restored by saying to the masses at the South, You have done wrong! Lay down your arms and you shall not be touched. But should Congress decide upon this emollient course, let Richardsoe his reception. Even while he blandly speaks, bowie-knives flash, revolvers are aimed at his sacred person, and an extemporized halter dangles aloft. Jefferson Davis and staff march from headquarters to behold his execution, and Richardson of Illinois is soon no more a member of Congress, and the caucus is reduced to Thirty-four. If he pleases to make this excursion upon his own responsibility, let him depart as soon as convenient. Our opinion is, that he will not be back again in his seat,
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 68
The Council of Thirty-five. on Saturday last, in Washington, thirty-five Conservative gentlemen solemnly resolved that the Abolitionists will leave to the country but little hope of the restoration of the Union or peace, if schemes of Confiscation, Emancipation, and other unconstitutional measures, shall be enacted under the form of laws. The thirty-five gentlemen voted to print this rather than else thrilling opinion, for the benefit of mankind in general, and then the Thirty-five gentlemavery there would have been no Rebellion. That is, upon all hands, admitted. Then, without Slavery there can be no Rebellion. Ah! that is a sequitur clear enough to most men, but altogether too tough a nut for the the Thirty-five Wise Men of Washington to crack! We are profoundly sorry for their intellectual. weakness; but instead of asking us to stultify ourselves, they should, for their own part, try to think with a little more accuracy. We hope that we are as willing to pardon injurie
Richardson (search for this): chapter 68
are; but at the risk of being, regarded as revengeful, we must admit our inability to keep pace with that eminent Professor of Forgiveness and Forgetfulness, Mr. Richardson of Illinois, who said in the Conserved Caucus, that peace can only be restored by saying to the masses at the South, You have done wrong! Lay down your arms and you shall not be touched. But should Congress decide upon this emollient course, let Richardson be the United States. Embassador to the camps of the Rebels! Let him enter their lines, blowing the most assuasive tunes upon the mildest of trumpets! Let him, while gentle smiles illumine his countenance, say tenderly to the Coolvers are aimed at his sacred person, and an extemporized halter dangles aloft. Jefferson Davis and staff march from headquarters to behold his execution, and Richardson of Illinois is soon no more a member of Congress, and the caucus is reduced to Thirty-four. If he pleases to make this excursion upon his own responsibility, l
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 68
they consider that by any constitutional theory the Union is abolished? that South Carolina could abolish it? that Jefferson Davis, by any villainy, could destroy it in any sense? Because, before a thing can be restored, if we know anything of laontending; so that fear of the abolition of Slavery had really nothing to do with the war. Is it to be supposed that Jefferson Davis is in the field because he believed his negroes would be taken from him by the Lincoln Administration? He must be gder than crude, who thinks so. Even the miserable heads of muddled Secessionists did not mix up matters in that way. What Davis and other gentlemen in the man-owning business were afraid of was, that non-extension might prove equivalent to non-existdly speaks, bowie-knives flash, revolvers are aimed at his sacred person, and an extemporized halter dangles aloft. Jefferson Davis and staff march from headquarters to behold his execution, and Richardson of Illinois is soon no more a member of Co
July 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 68
dquarters to behold his execution, and Richardson of Illinois is soon no more a member of Congress, and the caucus is reduced to Thirty-four. If he pleases to make this excursion upon his own responsibility, let him depart as soon as convenient. Our opinion is, that he will not be back again in his seat, at any rate during the present session. It must, we think, be taken for granted, by this time, that the Secession leaders are in earnest. They ask for no favors; they propose no treaties; they announce their intention of fighting out this quarrel. Are we never to take them at their word? Are we never to use the weapons which God and nature have put into our hands? It is not customary to approach a mad dog, holding an olive-branch in one hand and a leg of fat mutton in the other. The prejudice of the world is rather in favor of more active measures, whatever may be the opinion of the dog. And this is all we have to say at present of the Council of Thirty-five. July 5, 1862.