hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 898 0 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 776 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes 707 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 694 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 676 8 Browse Search
Alexander M. Grant 635 1 Browse Search
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) 452 6 Browse Search
David D. Porter 385 63 Browse Search
Thomas W. Sherman 383 7 Browse Search
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) 338 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,102 total hits in 271 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...
A. J. Slemmer (search for this): chapter 10
ht vindicate its authority over its own forts; and as Fort Pickens was very weakly manned by Capt. Slemmer and 25 men, and was in danger every hour of falling into the hands of the Confederates, he p the early events of the Rebellion will remember that Fort Pickens was under the command of Captain Slemmer, of the Army, who held it with a handful of men, and was preparing to defend it against a lian; Capt. W. S. Walker, commanding the Brooklyn, or other naval officers in command; and Lieut. A. J. Slemmer, 1st Regt. Artillery, U. S. A., commanding Fort Pickens: In consequence of the assuranrted on foot the Fort Pickens expedition. There were only twenty-five men in the fort under Capt. Slemmer, and at that time Naval Historian Boynton states that Mr. Welles had taken all the necessary March 12, 1861, twenty-four days elapsed before any thing was done to relieve Fort Pickens, Capt. Slemmer remaining in command of the fort all that time with only twenty-five men. Where, then, is th
A. A. Henderson (search for this): chapter 10
eon, T. M. Potter; Lieuts., James E. Jouett, J. J. Mitchell. B. N. Wescott, James H. Spotts; Act.-Master's Mate, Charles W. Adams; Asst.-Surg., C. H. Burbank; Paymaster, L. Warrington; Midshipmen, Frederick Rodgers, George M. Brown, S. H. Hunt; Boatswain, William Black; Carpenter, Wm. H. Edgar; Gunner, William Carter; First Lieut. of Marines, C. D. Hebb. Steamer Richmond. Capt., F. B. Ellison; Lieuts., N. C. Bryant, A. B. Cummings, Robert Boyd, Jr., Edward Terry, Byron Wilson; Surgeon, A. A. Henderson; Asst.-Surgeon, William Howell; Paymaster, Geo. F. Cutter; Boatswain, I. T. Choate; Sailmaker, H. T. Stocker; Carpenter, H. L. Dixon; Gunner, James Thayer; Act.-Master's Mate, H. W. Grinnell; First Lieut. Marines, Alan Ramsey; Chief Engineer, John W. Moore; Asst.-Engineers, Eben Hoyt, J. L. Butler, Wm. Pollard, A. W. Morley, G. W. W. Dove, R. B. Plotts, C. E. Emery. Sloop-of-war Vincennes. Commander, Robert Handy; Lieut., John E. Hart; Surgeon, S. A. Engles; Paymaster, R. C. S
t that the Government had concluded to give up Fort Sumter without an attempt to retain it. On Mr. Fox's arrival in Charleston he sought an interview with Lieut. Hartstene, formerly of the U. S. Navy, and stated to him his desire to visit Major Anderson, and Hartstene in consequence introduced him to Governor Pickens, to whom hHartstene in consequence introduced him to Governor Pickens, to whom he showed the orders under which he acted. Governor Pickens directed Lieut. Hartstene to take Mr. Fox to Fort Sumter, where they arrived after dark and remained two hours. Major Anderson seemed to think it was too late then to undertake to relieve Sumter by any other means than by landing an army on Morris Island. He thoughtLieut. Hartstene to take Mr. Fox to Fort Sumter, where they arrived after dark and remained two hours. Major Anderson seemed to think it was too late then to undertake to relieve Sumter by any other means than by landing an army on Morris Island. He thought an entrance from the sea impracticable, but while discussing the matter on the parapet Mr. Fox heard the sound of oars, and though the boat was very near she could not be seen through the haze and darkness of the night until she had actually reached the landing. This gave Mr. Fox the idea of supplying the fort by means of boats.
Montgomery Meigs (search for this): chapter 10
ll appear from Mr. Fox's letter, which has been quoted. Captain Montgomery Meigs, of the Engineer Corps, had been thinking of a plan by whing in troops and mounting heavy guns. Neither Mr. Seward nor Captain Meigs believed in the plan to succor Fort Sumter. In their opinion tusiness, and was slow to act, though precious time was flying. Captain Meigs conferred with Lieut. D. D. Porter, who conceived the plan perfmptly that he did know, and then suggested the plan proposed by Captain Meigs. You are the very man I want, said the Secretary. Come with me to the President. At that moment Captain Meigs came in and accompanied the party. Those familiar with the early events of the Rebellion lans that had been proposed. He had talked with Mr. Seward and Captain Meigs, and was so heartily interested in the scheme, that he agreed tdone but write the necessary orders, Lieut. Porter wrote out and Capt. Meigs transcribed them. They were as follows: Executive Mansi
Andrew H. Foote (search for this): chapter 10
6th that a telegraphic dispatch was received by Captain Foote (commanding New York Navy Yard) as follows: Prep o'clock A. M., on April 2d, presented himself to Capt. Foote (who was acting Commandant of the Navy Yard at the him the order to fit out the Powhatan; which order Foote received with much surprise at this unusual way of dng business. It required three hours to convince Capt. Foote that he must obey the President's order, and that Capt. Mercer considered it absolutely necessary for Foote to carry out the President's orders to the letter. nceal the intended movement. Capt. Meigs also urged Foote to obey the President's order, and he finally decide lines ready to cast off. Then a telegram came to Capt. Foote from the Navy Department: Prepare the Powhatan for sea with all dispatch. Here was a dilemma! Again Foote wanted to telegraph the state of affairs to the Secr left her. The moment the ship had left the yard, Foote could contain himself no longer, and he at once tele
D. B. Macomb (search for this): chapter 10
ster of August 31, 1861. Flagship Niagara. Captain Wm. W. McKean, Flag Officer; Lieuts., John Guest, Wm. F. Spicer, J. C. P. De Krafft, Robt. L. May and Edw. E. Potter; Fleet Surg., G. R. B. Horner; Surgeon, J. Foltz; Asst. Surg., James McAllister; Chaplain, C. S. Stewart; Paymaster, G. B. Barry; Masters, J. D. Marvin, James O'Kane, T. L. Swan, H. B. Robeson and Silas Casey, Jr.; Capt. Marines, Josiah Watson; First Lieut., Geo. Butler; Chief Engineer, Robt. H. Long; Asst.-Engineers, D. B. Macomb, C. B. Kidd, E. A. C. DuPlaine, L. R. Green, R. H. Grinnell, A. H. Fisher and Robt. Potts; Boatswain, A. M. Pomeroy; Gunner, R. J. Hill; Carpenter, John Rainbow; Sailmaker, Stephen Seaman. Frigate Santee. Captain, Henry Eagle; Surgeon, T. M. Potter; Lieuts., James E. Jouett, J. J. Mitchell. B. N. Wescott, James H. Spotts; Act.-Master's Mate, Charles W. Adams; Asst.-Surg., C. H. Burbank; Paymaster, L. Warrington; Midshipmen, Frederick Rodgers, George M. Brown, S. H. Hunt; Boatswain,
C. S. Stewart (search for this): chapter 10
the rebellion by maintaining the blockade of the Southern Coast, the most severe duty performed by any officers during the war. Gulf Squadron, 1861, vessels and officers. Note.--Names of officers obtained mostly from Navy Register of August 31, 1861. Flagship Niagara. Captain Wm. W. McKean, Flag Officer; Lieuts., John Guest, Wm. F. Spicer, J. C. P. De Krafft, Robt. L. May and Edw. E. Potter; Fleet Surg., G. R. B. Horner; Surgeon, J. Foltz; Asst. Surg., James McAllister; Chaplain, C. S. Stewart; Paymaster, G. B. Barry; Masters, J. D. Marvin, James O'Kane, T. L. Swan, H. B. Robeson and Silas Casey, Jr.; Capt. Marines, Josiah Watson; First Lieut., Geo. Butler; Chief Engineer, Robt. H. Long; Asst.-Engineers, D. B. Macomb, C. B. Kidd, E. A. C. DuPlaine, L. R. Green, R. H. Grinnell, A. H. Fisher and Robt. Potts; Boatswain, A. M. Pomeroy; Gunner, R. J. Hill; Carpenter, John Rainbow; Sailmaker, Stephen Seaman. Frigate Santee. Captain, Henry Eagle; Surgeon, T. M. Potter; Lie
George W. Blunt (search for this): chapter 10
ank in Washington who would sustain Mr. Fox in his project, directing that if one could be found he should be brought to the executive mansion. Mr. Fox took Commodore Stringham to the President, who that morning had held a long conference with Commodore Stewart, and both declared that Sumter could be relieved on the plan Mr. Fox proposed. On the 10th of March the President sent Mr. Fox to New York to make inquiries about obtaining vessels for the voyage, and he there consulted Messrs. George W. Blunt, Wm. H. Aspinwall and Charles H. Maxwell with regard to the necessary preparations. There were many delays in getting off the expedition, caused principally by everybody's desire to avoid a war. As late as the 4th of April the President informed Mr. Fox that he would allow the expedition to start for Charleston, but that he would in the meantime write a letter to the authorities of that place and promise that no attempt would be made to land troops if vessels were allowed to supply
E. S. Boynton (search for this): chapter 10
commission. To read the account of the naval historian (Boynton), the Navy Department depended on the Powhatan for the sucwhatan has so constantly been quoted by a naval historian (Boynton), and he has stated certain matters in a way not altogethehat indecision or apparent inaction (which is spoken of in Boynton's Naval History of the War) from March 4th to April, 1861. as effective as if he had built a thousand-gun fort. Mr. Boynton, a very clever and pleasant historian, and who has writtthe Navy, gives a different version of this affair. But Mr. Boynton was not altogether fair when anything regarding the claie nothing undone to obtain a true statement of affairs. Mr. Boynton while writing his history held an appointment under the lves prominent in the war. It was only in cases where Mr. Boynton felt called upon to adopt the views of the Navy Departmefort under Capt. Slemmer, and at that time Naval Historian Boynton states that Mr. Welles had taken all the necessary precaut
J. D. Marvin (search for this): chapter 10
uthern Coast, the most severe duty performed by any officers during the war. Gulf Squadron, 1861, vessels and officers. Note.--Names of officers obtained mostly from Navy Register of August 31, 1861. Flagship Niagara. Captain Wm. W. McKean, Flag Officer; Lieuts., John Guest, Wm. F. Spicer, J. C. P. De Krafft, Robt. L. May and Edw. E. Potter; Fleet Surg., G. R. B. Horner; Surgeon, J. Foltz; Asst. Surg., James McAllister; Chaplain, C. S. Stewart; Paymaster, G. B. Barry; Masters, J. D. Marvin, James O'Kane, T. L. Swan, H. B. Robeson and Silas Casey, Jr.; Capt. Marines, Josiah Watson; First Lieut., Geo. Butler; Chief Engineer, Robt. H. Long; Asst.-Engineers, D. B. Macomb, C. B. Kidd, E. A. C. DuPlaine, L. R. Green, R. H. Grinnell, A. H. Fisher and Robt. Potts; Boatswain, A. M. Pomeroy; Gunner, R. J. Hill; Carpenter, John Rainbow; Sailmaker, Stephen Seaman. Frigate Santee. Captain, Henry Eagle; Surgeon, T. M. Potter; Lieuts., James E. Jouett, J. J. Mitchell. B. N. Wescott,
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...