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Saw Mills (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
s quickly as possible to headquarters, set fire to everything of a public character. The Navy Yard contained five saw-mills, besides planing-mills, machine shops, carpenter and blacksmith shops, in fact all the appliances for building a Navy. Saw-mills above the city were also destroyed and the Federal forces left nothing that could be used towards building a boat even. Yazoo never built another ram; the people were quite satisfied to have their houses left standing. The expedition retung the way. Failing in his efforts to make a passage through the boats, he set fire to them and they were all destroyed. The expedition was attacked at this point by artillery and sharp-shooters in force, but they were driven off with loss. Saw-mills were burned, the corn on which an enemy could subsist was destroyed, and at Yazoo City the crews landed and brought away all the bar, round and flat iron intended to be used in the building of their ironclads. Armed boats were sent through t
Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ht in some way be serviceable to the enemy and an expedition under Lieutenant-Commander Walker of the DeKalb was sent up that river to capture or destroy them. The Forest Rose, Linden, Signal and Petrel (vessels whose names have appeared frequently in this history) accompanied the expedition. The Signal knocked down her chimney among the trees the first night, and had to return. Walker pushed on with the smaller vessels (leaving the DeKalb to follow after) to within fifteen miles of Fort Pemberton, where the steamers John Walsh, Lockwood, Golden age and Scotland were found sunk on a bar, completely blocking the way. Failing in his efforts to make a passage through the boats, he set fire to them and they were all destroyed. The expedition was attacked at this point by artillery and sharp-shooters in force, but they were driven off with loss. Saw-mills were burned, the corn on which an enemy could subsist was destroyed, and at Yazoo City the crews landed and brought away all the
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
as in front, and the shriek of the shells from the army field-pieces, as they fell by the hundred in the Confederate works, could be heard down on the water amid the roar of the heavy cannon. The batteries one after another were silenced, as the gunboats, boats, firing bow and broadside guns, moved upon them until they came to the 13-gun battery in front of the city. This battery was commanded by Colonel Higgins (formerly a lieutenant in the U. S. Navy), who had so gallantly defended Fort Jackson. He felt called upon to show his old naval friends that he would not flinch from his post no matter what force was brought against him. But the water was high (nearly level with the banks), and the gunboats were above the enemy's water batteries; the first time they had ever enjoyed this advantage. They had nothing but this one battery to engage their attention, as all the others had been silenced. This was the hottest fire the gun-boats had yet been under, as Col. Higgins clung to his
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
e rebels when there was no time to hear from me. The war on the banks of the Tennessee and Cumberland has been carried on most actively. There has been incessant skirmishing between the guerrillas and gun-boats, in which the rebels have been defeated in every instance. So constant are these attacks that we cease to think of them as of any importance, though there has been much gallantry displayed on many occasions. Lieutenant-Commanders Phelps and Fitch have each had command of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, and have shown themselves to be most able officers. I feel no apprehension at any time with regard to movements in that quarter. Had it not been for the activity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Priche
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
et they were sent on shore to work the guns. As no dissatisfaction was expressed by the officers in command, it was presumed that the sailors performed their duty well. The banks of the Mississippi were so watchfully guarded from Vicksburg to Cairo that the Army transports went through with troops and stores, for a distance of about 450 miles, without molestation. The marine brigade, under Brigadier-General Ellet, was constantly landing along the river to break up guerilla warfare. Withou and the able general who commanded the Army I have not feared for the result, though it has been postponed longer than I thought it would be. First and foremost, allow me to speak of Captain Pennock, fleet captain and commandant of station at Cairo. To him I am much indebted for the promptness with which he has kept the squadron supplied with all that was required or could be procured. His duty has been no sinecure. and he has performed it with an ability that could not have been surpa
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
was left master of the field. It is not likely that he enjoyed the sport however, as he afterwards confessed to losing a great many of his men. The gun-boats had done what was required of them by General Grant, and more. He asked an hour's attack to annoy the garrison, while his Army assaulted in the rear; they fought the batteries for two hours and a half, more than twice as long as was required, and with what success will be seen from the following letter of General McArthur. Headquarters, 6Th Division, 17Th Army Corps, In Field Near Vicksburg, Miss., May 23, 1863. Admiral — I received your communication with regard to silencing the two batteries below Vicksburg, and in reply would say that I witnessed with intense interest the firing on that day, it being the finest I have yet seen. I would have taken advantage of the results thus gained by your vessels, and had given the necessary orders to do so, when I received peremptory orders from Major-General McClernand to m
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
the whole fabric was consumed. This was the last work built by the Confederates on the Mississippi River. All the appliances of a fort and a quantity of stores were in the houses at Warrenton. s in command, it was presumed that the sailors performed their duty well. The banks of the Mississippi were so watchfully guarded from Vicksburg to Cairo that the Army transports went through withken care of by the Navy, while he was engaged in reducing the monster on the east bank of the Mississippi. When the Army and Navy started out to capture Vicksburg the Mississippi was closed againshern cause, when the great slave power which had controlled so many miles of the banks of the Mississippi no longer existed. The chain which held slavery together was broken, and the commerce of thethe river. The fall of Vicksburg insured the fall of Port Hudson and the opening of the Mississippi River, which, I am happy to say, can be traversed from its source to its mouth, without apparent
Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
f. midnight attack on Vicksburg by the Army and Navy. attack on Yazoo City by the gun-boats and destruction of three iron-clad rams. attacke Yazoo River with a sufficient force to destroy all the works at Yazoo City, which had been used in the construction of their rams. As this naval force approached Yazoo City, the Confederate property was set on fire by Lieutenant Brown,late commander of the Arkansas, and our men no effort was left untried to reach the place and destroy her. Yazoo City fared badly for its misfortune in being selected as a site for a es left nothing that could be used towards building a boat even. Yazoo never built another ram; the people were quite satisfied to have thy other vessels on the tributaries of the Mississippi, and though Yazoo City was for some time after the rendevous of the cowardly guerillas, d, the corn on which an enemy could subsist was destroyed, and at Yazoo City the crews landed and brought away all the bar, round and flat iro
Warrenton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
uld get to the Confederates from that quarter. One iron-clad was left at Carthage, three at Warrenton, (where the enemy aimed at building heavy works), and two or three in the Yazoo. Notwithsta even willing that the gun-boats should have the satisfaction of going to the landing opposite Warrenton to obtain provisions and coal. They proceeded to erect a heavy work there that would command mpervious to shot or shells. Lieutenant-Commander Wilson, in the Mound City, appeared below Warrenton about the 12th of May, and seeing these works and no persons about, sent a party on shore to rississippi River. All the appliances of a fort and a quantity of stores were in the houses at Warrenton. which the Confederates set fire to and destroyed. And what houses were left in the town were destroyed by the Mound City's men. Warrenton had been a troublesome place and merited its fate. On the 15th of May, the admiral joined the fleet in the Yazoo, and on the 16th firing was heard in
Youngs Point (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
e Confederates through Louisiana. General Price had been moving about some twelve miles from Young's Point among the swamps and bayous, and it was reported that he intended to seize Young's Point witYoung's Point with some ten thousand men and try to provision Vicksburg by the front. There was only a small force of Federal troops at Young's Point and Milliken's Bend at this time, and Price might have gained aYoung's Point and Milliken's Bend at this time, and Price might have gained a partial success, but nothing substantial. One attempt was made on Milliken's Bend, and quite a number of the garrison killed, but the gun-boats Choctaw and Lexington went immediately to the reliequipped and fairly disciplined. General Mower, a very brave officer, had about 8,000 men at Young's Point, and uniting the marine brigade with his troops he marched out to hunt up General Price's arn the whole of our Army was in the rear of Vicksburg, with the exception of a small force at Young's Point under General Mower, and that place was attacked by Major-General Price with 12,000 men, the
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