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Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
return and extinguish the flames, he proceeded on his way up the river. He reached the town of Jacksonville, landed, threw out pickets and placed guards over the public buildings. Jacksonville was the county-seat of Onslow County, and quite an important place. Here he captured 25 stand of arms in the Court-house, and a large mail in the post-office. He also took two schooners and confiscated the negroes of the Confederate postmaster. Jacksonville being situated on the main road to Wilmington, it was not long before the news of Cushing's performances reached the latter place, and the Confederates at once took measures to prevent his escape. As soon as he had finished with the town, Cushing dropped down with his two prizes until he came in sight of a camp on the riverbank, which he shelled very thoroughly. The enemy opened fire on the Ellis with rifles, but they were soon dispersed. Night coming on, the pilots declined to take the vessels out of the river until daylight nex
Onslow (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
of a vessel bound out with a load of cotton and turpentine. The enemy set fire to her in order to prevent her falling into Cushing's hands; but this officer did not waste time over her. After assuring himself that she was thoroughly ignited, and that the owner could not return and extinguish the flames, he proceeded on his way up the river. He reached the town of Jacksonville, landed, threw out pickets and placed guards over the public buildings. Jacksonville was the county-seat of Onslow County, and quite an important place. Here he captured 25 stand of arms in the Court-house, and a large mail in the post-office. He also took two schooners and confiscated the negroes of the Confederate postmaster. Jacksonville being situated on the main road to Wilmington, it was not long before the news of Cushing's performances reached the latter place, and the Confederates at once took measures to prevent his escape. As soon as he had finished with the town, Cushing dropped down wit
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
r, leaving Commander S. C. Rowan in charge of the sounds of North Carolina. The gallant service performed by Commander Rowan, in the capture of Newburn and Elizabeth City, has already been related, though complete justice has not been done to the officers and men who embarked in frail vessels never intended to go under the fireved under him, as for its brevity and truthfulness; he could have said no more had he used a folio of words: Order.United States Steamer Delaware. off Elizabeth City. February 11th, 1862. The commander of the flotilla in Albemarle Sound avails himself of the earliest moment to make a public acknowledgment of the coolnesGoldsborough all the sounds had been taken possession of under the admirable management of Commander Rowan, Lieutenant Flusser and others. Newbern, Plymouth, Elizabeth City, and every important place, was in charge of a gun-boat or was garrisoned by soldiers, and most of the Confederate troops that had been sent to resist the Uni
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
by the Confederates, June 11. Susquehanna, Seminole and Dakota anchor before Norfolk. the retreating enemy set fire to the Navy Yard. attack on Drury's Bluff by ear-Admiral Goldsborough's fleet captain. known, but on the 10th of May, 1862, Norfolk surrendered to a Federal force under General Wool,who had landed at Willoughbyerrimac was blown up. Thus ended the farce of the Confederate occupation of Norfolk. It should never have fallen into their hands, and could have been retaken atn colors. The Susquehanna, Seminole, Dakota and San Jacinto proceeded up to Norfolk without difficulty, and cast their anchors before the town. The deserting Connfederate officers might have a chance some day to live in them again. Thus Norfolk became the head quarters of the Navy, as it ought to have been from the beginn as on May 9, 1862, while the Confederates were much weaker. The retreat from Norfolk was caused by a panic which sometimes seizes upon people, and leads them to do
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
other vessels. remarks on the services of the North Atlantic Squadron. Flag-officer Goldsborough and Commander Rowan receive the thanks of congress. attack on Hamilton by Lieutenant Flusser. attack on Confederate troops at Washington, N. C., by Lieutenant R. T. Renshaw. blowing up of the Army gun-boat picket. exhibit of t river, at 1 o'clock P. M., the flotilla was fired upon from the south bank by riflemen. Flusser returned the fire and pushed on, expecting to meet the enemy at Hamilton in force. The vessels were under fire from the banks and rifle-pits for two hours, during which time they had to run very slowly, looking out for batteries. When they reached Hamilton, the enemy, who had been firing from concealed places, retreated, being afraid to meet Flusser's little force of 100 sailors and soldiers in the open field. The only reward which they received for all their exposure was the capture of an unimportant town and a small schooner. The loss on board the ve
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 35
r Rowan receive the thanks of congress. attack on Hamilton by Lieutenant Flusser. attack on Confederate troops at Washington, N. C., by Lieutenant R. T. Renshaw. blowing up of the Army gun-boat picket. exhibit of the work done by the North At this squadron to attract much notice, yet it was in some respects the most important squadron afloat. The security of Washington greatly depended on its efficiency, for, in the event of a move of the Confederates upon the Capital, a large force of t the enemy from marching directly upon the city, and give time to assemble troops enough to meet him in the field. Washington City would have been cut off entirely in its river communications with the North, in the earlier part of the war, but forwere highly spoken of. Acting-Lieutenant R. T. Renshaw, commanding U. S. steamer Louisana, reports that while at Washington, N. C., on the 6th of September, 1862, the enemy attacked that place in force and opened on his vessel with volleys of mus
Zuni (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
ons of Flag-officer Goldsborough in the sounds of North Carolina. importance of gun-boats in co-operating expeditions of the Army and Navy. Commander S. C. Rowan's general order to the officers and men under his command. operations in the Blackwater River under Lieutenant Flusser. the gun-boats extricate themselves from a dilemma. notice of Lieutenant Cushing, his attack on the town of Jacksonville and his gallant defence of the Ellis. capture of Fort Macon by the Army and Navy. surrender been carried out with a judgment and success which entitled all concerned to the highest praise. In the latter part of September, 1862, a joint expedition of the Army and Navy was prepared to operate against Franklin, a small town on the Blackwater River. It was agreed between the military commander, General Dix, and the commander of the gun-boats, that the attack should be made on the 3d of October. The expedition was under the command of Lieutenant C. W. Flusser, on board the steamer C
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
elves suffered little damage. On May 5, 1862, Yorktown was evacuated by the Confederates, and General McClellan telegraphed to Captain Wm. Smith of the Wachusett to assist in communicating with Gloucester and to send some of the gun-boats up York River to reconnoitre. The flotilla was immediately underway, and proceeded to Gloucester Point, where the American flag was hoisted. The Corwin, Lieutenant T. S. Phelps, and the Currituck, Acting-Master W. F. Shankland, pushed on some twelve mile extreme, and the officers of the Navy were delighted with this opportunity to show that the same spirit existed at this point as elsewhere to perform the most hazardous undertakings. The work of the North Atlantic squadron in the James and York rivers was deficient in those dashing strokes which had been made in other squadrons, and which so attracted the attention of the Northern people. With the single exception of the affair of the Merrimac, nothing had been done by the northern portion
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
wn, May 5, 1862. co-operation of the Navy. attack on Sewell's Point by Flag-officer Goldsborough. evacuation of Sewell's Sewell's Point and Craney Island. Merrimac blown up by the Confederates, June 11. Susquehanna, Seminole and Dakota anchor before Noough was ordered by the President to make an attack on Sewell's Point and to ascertain the possibility of landing a body of . The demonstration was made, and the ships shelled Sewell's Point, and ascertained the fact that the number of the enemyederates found that they could not hold their works at Sewell's Point in the face of even a small number of troops, or that ho had landed at Willoughby's Point. All the works on Sewell's Point were evacuated, and also those at Craney Island, and er stay there, he sent Lieutenant Selfridge in a tug to Sewell's Point, and Commander Case in another to Craney Island, to asertain the position of affairs. Selfridge landed at Sewell's Point and found that the enemy had departed, on which he hoi
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
sels to Philadelphia and New York for repairs, and now the operations up the James River could be carried on more effectively. On May 18, 1862, Flag-officer Goldsborough reports to the Department an engagement which took place on the James River between some gun-boats under Commander John Rodgers and a heavy battery on Drury' steamers Aroostook, Port Royal and Naugatuck. These vessels moved up the James River on the 15th of May and encountered no artificial impediments until they reacs expedition convinced Commander Rodgers that an army could be landed on the James River within ten miles of Richmond, on either bank, and that this land force with evacuation of Drury's Bluff in its then condition, and other forts along the James River; that obstructions could then be removed, and perhaps the gun-boats might wo most hazardous undertakings. The work of the North Atlantic squadron in the James and York rivers was deficient in those dashing strokes which had been made in o
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