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der his command, and reported that the credit of the Navy had been well maintained throughout. Commander Renshaw, at Washington, and Lieutenant-Commander McCann, below on the river, conducted affairs with prudence and zeal. The former held a position of great responsibility and severe trial, and he met the various emergencies with promptness and decision. He had the direction of naval matters, and would have been held responsible if the town had fallen into the enemy's hands. On the 3d inst., the enemy had established their batteries abreast of the town, one of them a rifled 12-pounder, distant 600 yards. The batteries succeeded in firing only five shots before they were silenced by the Federal shell, which fairly demolished the works. During the siege (if it may be so called) there was an incessant peal of artillery, and the enemy seemed determined to carry the place, no matter what the cost might be to them; but, whether aground on the river-bed or lying in the stream, the
eries, thus conveying ammunition and dispatches. On the 3d of April, the flotilla below Hill's Point was reinforced by the Southfield, Whitehead and Seymour, from Plymouth. In the meantime the Commodore Hull and Louisiana, and an armed transport called the Eagle, under charge of Second-Assistant Engineer J. L. Lay and Assistant Paymaster W. W. Williams, of the Louisiana, as volunteers, were almost continually engaged with the enemy's batteries opposite Washington, until the morning of the 4th, when the Ceres made a gallant dash past the forts, with a full supply of ammunition, and joined the besieged force above. On the 6th, a small naval battery of two light guns was established on shore, commanding the channel from above, to repel any attempt on the part of the enemy to attack the gun-boats from that quarter by water. On the 7th inst. 112, on the 8th 107, and on the 9th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On
Whitehead and Seymour, from Plymouth. In the meantime the Commodore Hull and Louisiana, and an armed transport called the Eagle, under charge of Second-Assistant Engineer J. L. Lay and Assistant Paymaster W. W. Williams, of the Louisiana, as volunteers, were almost continually engaged with the enemy's batteries opposite Washington, until the morning of the 4th, when the Ceres made a gallant dash past the forts, with a full supply of ammunition, and joined the besieged force above. On the 6th, a small naval battery of two light guns was established on shore, commanding the channel from above, to repel any attempt on the part of the enemy to attack the gun-boats from that quarter by water. On the 7th inst. 112, on the 8th 107, and on the 9th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. O
iams, of the Louisiana, as volunteers, were almost continually engaged with the enemy's batteries opposite Washington, until the morning of the 4th, when the Ceres made a gallant dash past the forts, with a full supply of ammunition, and joined the besieged force above. On the 6th, a small naval battery of two light guns was established on shore, commanding the channel from above, to repel any attempt on the part of the enemy to attack the gun-boats from that quarter by water. On the 7th inst. 112, on the 8th 107, and on the 9th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. On the 12th, the gun-boats silenced and destroyed by their fire a battery which the enemy had erected with sand-bags and cotton-bales, abreast of the town, and which for seven days previously had maintained an active a
en the Ceres made a gallant dash past the forts, with a full supply of ammunition, and joined the besieged force above. On the 6th, a small naval battery of two light guns was established on shore, commanding the channel from above, to repel any attempt on the part of the enemy to attack the gun-boats from that quarter by water. On the 7th inst. 112, on the 8th 107, and on the 9th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. On the 12th, the gun-boats silenced and destroyed by their fire a battery which the enemy had erected with sand-bags and cotton-bales, abreast of the town, and which for seven days previously had maintained an active and dangerous fire on them. On the 13th, the Confederate boats filled with infantry, as pickets on the river below the forts, were driven ashore by Ac
24-pound howitzer. Stepping Stones (light ferry-boat),with a battery of howitzers. The Commodore Barney, Lieutenant W. B. Cushing, was also detached from other duty and sent to Jamestown Island. Commander (afterwards Rear-Admiral) Stephen D. Trenchard. The above list of vessels will show to what shifts the Navy was put to meet the calls made upon it by the Army. Gun-boats were called for everywhere, and these demands were more than the naval commander could comply with. On the 11th, Major-General Keyes telegraphed that the Federal troops in the neighborhood of Williamsburg were being driven by a large force of Confederates down towards the mouth of Queen's Creek, and that, if a large force of gun-boats was not sent to Yorktown, even Yorktown itself might fall. The Commodore Morris (the only available vessel) was sent immediately to the York River to co-operate with the Crusader, then there. Any one can imagine the embarrassment the commander-in-chief labored under t
55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. On the 12th, the gun-boats silenced and destroyed by their fire a battery which the enemy had erected with sand-bags and cotton-bales, abreast of the town, and which for seven days previously had maintained an active and dangerous fire on them. On the 13th3 shot and shells from the James Adger, and 145 from the flag-ship Minnesota. On the 22d of August, 1863, quite a gallant affair took place, when Lieutenant Cushing cut out and destroyed the blockade-running schooner Alexander Cooper. On the 12th, Cushing made a reconnaissance, in the boats of the Shokokon, of New Topsail Inlet, and was driven off by the fire of four Confederate field-pieces stationed near the entrance of the inlet. But before he was driven back he discovered a schooner a
th 55 shot and shell were fired by the enemy at the gun-boats without inflicting any serious damage. On the 10th, Acting-Ensign J. B. De Camarra succeeded in getting a schooner through from the lower fleet, loaded with naval ammunition. On the 12th, the gun-boats silenced and destroyed by their fire a battery which the enemy had erected with sand-bags and cotton-bales, abreast of the town, and which for seven days previously had maintained an active and dangerous fire on them. On the 13th, the Confederate boats filled with infantry, as pickets on the river below the forts, were driven ashore by Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Macdearmid, with a howitzer on a small schooner. On the same night the army transport Escort gallantly ran the blockade, with reinforcements for the Federal troops at Washington, having safely passed Hill's Point under cover of the gun-boats below. On the 14th and 15th, the enemy kept up a vigorous fire with their artillery, which was returned by the gun-
work; and who can so well describe, not only the acts that were done, but the motives that inspired them? Now and then a paragraph forcibly strikes our attention, and, though it lengthens this work beyond bounds, we cannot leave it out. On the 14th, when the Mount Washington was fighting her way out of the mud, and was getting out hawsers to bring her broadside to bear, Lamson says: * * * The hawser slipped, and the channel being so narrow, she was obliged to run down some distance beforwith a howitzer on a small schooner. On the same night the army transport Escort gallantly ran the blockade, with reinforcements for the Federal troops at Washington, having safely passed Hill's Point under cover of the gun-boats below. On the 14th and 15th, the enemy kept up a vigorous fire with their artillery, which was returned by the gun-boats. An opportunity occurred about the time mentioned for the Army and Navy to score a strong point on the Confederates. There were a number of t
he enemy's works at Hill's Point, but it was not attempted. The Confederate batteries were behind strong natural banks of earth-works, perforated at points with embrasures. The gun-boats had attacked them several times without any apparent effect. The position was deemed too strong to carry by assault with a limited number of troops, so the gun-boats and transports had to lie at anchor before it and make no sign, until troops could be marched overland from Newbern. On the morning of the 15th, the steamer Escort arrived with General Foster on board, who seemed to think the situation so serious that his presence was demanded. The day after his arrival the enemy suddenly disappeared, and the siege was raised. The commander of the North Atlantic squadron seemed to be well satisfied with the conduct of those under his command, and reported that the credit of the Navy had been well maintained throughout. Commander Renshaw, at Washington, and Lieutenant-Commander McCann, below on
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