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Halifax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
earth-works (which finally grew to be Fort Fisher) on the north side. Many reports are made of the capture or destruction of blockade-runners, and in chasing up these vessels great activity was displayed. On the 6th of May, Lieutenant-Commander Braine reports a boat expedition from the steamer Monticello and the mortar schooner Matthew Vassar (Acting-Master L. A. Brown), mentioning the destruction of one of the vessels in Morrell's Inlet, an English schooner called the Golden Liner, of Halifax, with a large cargo, and also the burning of two large store-houses. Destruction of this kind of property always caused serious loss to the enemy, and it could not be replaced. On May 26th, Rear-Admiral Lee reports the operations in the sounds of North Carolina. It appears that the Confederates had invested Washington, on the Pamlico River, which investment lasted eighteen days, and after a fruitless effort to take the place (which would have been of no use to them if they had succeede
Hill's Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
in demand. Lieutenant Lamson distinguishes himself at Hill's Point. Cushing prevents Longstreet and forces from crossing etty, effecting the capture of five guns and 130 men on Hill's Point. This position commanded the communication between theng the withdrawal of the troops, etc., last night, from Hill's Point, and for the efficient aid rendered by him, his officerieged forces at Washington, but they were stopped below Hill's Point by the re-establishment of the enemy's batteries there,d dispatches. On the 3d of April, the flotilla below Hill's Point was reinforced by the Southfield, Whitehead and Seymour the Federal troops at Washington, having safely passed Hill's Point under cover of the gun-boats below. On the 14th and tes. There were a number of troops in transports below Hill's Point waiting the opportunity to reinforce the troops above, e troops could easily have carried the enemy's works at Hill's Point, but it was not attempted. The Confederate batteries w
Mattapony River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
en who received commendations. General spinola's testimony in regard to gallant conduct of Navy. Lieutenant French's expedition. important captures. General Dix evacuates West Point, covered by gun-boats. expeditions up North, York, and Mattapony Rivers. cutting out of Confederate steamer Kate from under guns of Fort Fisher. acts of bravery displayed. attempt to destroy steamer Hebe. Lieutenant Cushing cuts out and destroys blockade-runner Alexander Cooper. destruction of the Venus. Mdore Morris (Lieutenant-Commander Gillis), Commodore Jones (Lieutenant-Commander Mitchell), the army gun-boat Smith Briggs and the transport Winnissimmet. These vessels proceeded to Walkertown, about twenty miles above West Point, on the Mattapony River. Here the troops were landed and marched to Aylett's, where the object of the expedition was successfully accomplished: a large foundry, with all its machinery, grist mills, and a quantity of grain were destroyed, and a number of horses cap
New Inlet (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
oing into Wilmington, was driven on Smith's Island Beach by the gun-boat Penobscot, but was eventually floated off by the enemy, and towed under the batteries at New Inlet. Early in the morning of the 1st of August, the blockading vessels, James Adger, Mount Vernon and Iroquois, approached, and the Mount Vernon, discovering the Fort Fisher (which had not at that time assumed such formidable proportions as it did later on). The Confederates were at this time towing the Kate in towards New Inlet, and Commander Patterson, in the James Adger, was ordered to assist the Mount Vernon in cutting her out, and prevent her reaching the protection of the batterieslf went alongside, and sent another party on board at the same time. A hawser was made fast to the prize, and she was towed out. The Confederate batteries at New Inlet opened with great vigor, and a masked battery of Whitworth guns on Smith's Island kept up a furious fire. The enemy did not seem to be particular in his aim, as
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
e done except keeping up a strict blockade of the coast and keeping the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds under subjection. All the naval force of the enemy between Norfolk and Howlet batteries had either been destroyed or made its escape to Richmond, enabling the Navy Department to decrease the large force kept in and about Hampton 862, the Government met with a serious loss by the sinking at sea of the famous little Monitor, which had set the huge Merrimac at defiance and driven her back to Norfolk. This was not only the great actual loss of a fighting vessel, but in addition there were associations connected with this little craft which made her name dear er the Purquimenous River, and returned that same night to Plymouth. Thus was cut off one of the means by which the enemy had supplied themselves with goods from Norfolk and Richmond, by the south side of the Chowan River, enabling the Navy to guard that ford with a gun-boat; for a large amount of contraband traffic had been carri
Sunny Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
and puts enemy to flight. other adventures. Lieutenant Flusser's expedition to Hertford, N. C. Confederates attack Fort Anderson. assistance rendered by gun-boats. enemy withdraws. letter of Col. Belknap. great havoc committed by steamer Hetz and their determination to give the enemy no rest. On the 14th of March, 1863, the Confederates made an attack on Fort Anderson, a work built by the Union troops opposite Newbern, and occupied by a regiment of volunteers. The enemy bombarded thk twice, but the schooner was placed in a sinking condition. Had it not been for the prompt assistance rendered to Fort Anderson by the gun boats, it would certainly have fallen into the enemy's hands. From the fact that the Army undertook to ho, 1863, General Pettigrew, with eighteen pieces of artillery and over three thousand men, made his furious assault on Fort Anderson, an unfinished earth-work garrisoned by three hundred men of my command (the 92d New York Volunteers), the capture or
Chowan River (United States) (search for this): chapter 36
of Monitor. gallant rescue of greater portion of Monitor's crew by the Rhode Island. serious loss to the government. operations of Lieutenant Flusser on the Chowan River. attack on Plymouth, N. C. the Southfield disabled. achievements of General J. G. Foster. Army and Navy co-operate in expedition against Goldsborough, N. CLee. He was a terror to the marauding troops of the enemy, who made a note of all his movements. On December 9th, 1862. he left Plymouth to operate on the Chowan River, leaving the Southfield, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. F. W. Behm, to protect the place. He had not much more than started when the enemy appeared and commennight to Plymouth. Thus was cut off one of the means by which the enemy had supplied themselves with goods from Norfolk and Richmond, by the south side of the Chowan River, enabling the Navy to guard that ford with a gun-boat; for a large amount of contraband traffic had been carried on from the Albemarle Sound and its rivers by
Smith's Island, N.C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
expeditions as accomplished important results. Our pages are limited, and we desire to make them as bright as possible. On the 31st of July, 1863, the steamer Kate, belonging to the Confederates, while going into Wilmington, was driven on Smith's Island Beach by the gun-boat Penobscot, but was eventually floated off by the enemy, and towed under the batteries at New Inlet. Early in the morning of the 1st of August, the blockading vessels, James Adger, Mount Vernon and Iroquois, approachederself went alongside, and sent another party on board at the same time. A hawser was made fast to the prize, and she was towed out. The Confederate batteries at New Inlet opened with great vigor, and a masked battery of Whitworth guns on Smith's Island kept up a furious fire. The enemy did not seem to be particular in his aim, as an 80--pounder Armstrong rifle-shot passed through the port-side of the Kate, and out through the starboard bulwarks, just as the Mount Vernon and her boats board
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
lantic Squadron, 1863. Successful expedition off Yorktown and up Neuse River. loss of Monitor. gallant rescue oe naval expedition under Commander Foxhall A. Parker, off Yorktown, which proved successful, the Navy being of much service ediately required by the Army to move up and down between Yorktown and Queen's Creek, and also to lie near Jamestown Island., and that, if a large force of gun-boats was not sent to Yorktown, even Yorktown itself might fall. The Commodore Morris (Yorktown itself might fall. The Commodore Morris (the only available vessel) was sent immediately to the York River to co-operate with the Crusader, then there. Any one cage, provisions and ammunition, and landing them safely at Yorktown. In the latter part of May, Lieutenant-Commander Jamesng of June 4th, an expedition of 400 soldiers embarked at Yorktown on board the United States steamers Commodore Morris (Liion of West Point and then evacuating it, to fall back on Yorktown, which latter place seems to have been kept for a harbor
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
or the contending forces throughout the war. On January 5th the indefatigable Lieutenant Cushing started on an expedition to capture some Wilmington pilots, and having heard that there was a pilot station at Little River, thirty miles below Fort Caswell. he made sail for that point, and reached it on the morning of January 5th, 1863. He crossed the bar at 8 o'clock at night with twenty-five men, in three cutters, and proceeded up the river. He was in hopes of finding pilots above and also ke to below Cape Fear shoals. The Cape Fear River had (since the complete blockade of Charleston) become the principal ground for blockade-runners, that river having two entrances, by either of which blockade-runners could enter, protected by Fort Caswell on the south side of Cape Fear, and by strong earth-works (which finally grew to be Fort Fisher) on the north side. Many reports are made of the capture or destruction of blockade-runners, and in chasing up these vessels great activity was
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