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Grand Ecore (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
states as follows: When we returned to Grand Ecore, I sent Colonel Bailey to Admiral Porter, s burning until the Army was on its march to Grand Ecore, which seemed to be the signal for the dest; and, if they did get over, to assemble at Grand Ecore and remain there to protect that place. s says delayed the Army, took possession of Grand Ecore, which place had been evacuated by the enemy. Banks' army did not reach Grand Ecore until the 1st, 2d, and 3d of April. How, then, can Generat passed the Falls were necessary to guard Grand Ecore, and a sufficient force was left to protecty exclusively in its retrograde movement to Grand Ecore. (!!) Banks might also have added-impelpids at Alexandria, and three days delay at Grand Ecore in waiting the rise of the river, enabled t that all my vessels navigated the river to Grand Ecore with ease, and with some of them I reached fact that the gun-boats were unable to pass Grand Ecore until the 7th, justified the belief that it[6 more...]
Atchafalaya River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
as intent on a march on Shreveport, although in a letter to Halleck he says: The rivers and bayous have not been so low in this State for fifty years, and Admiral Porter informs me that the mouth of the Red River, and also the mouth of the Atchafalaya, are both hermetically sealed to his vessels by almost dry sand-bars, so that he cannot get any of the vessels into any of the streams. It is supposed that the first rise of the season will occur early in the next month. (!) Whatever may about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry for
Monroe (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, making a formidable army of from 25,000 to 30,000 men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and co-operation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my dispatch o
Matagorda Peninsula, Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
designated it would be entirely successful. Having received from them similar assurances, both my discretion and my authority, so far as the organization of the expedition was concerned, were at an end. The disposition of the enemy's forces at that time, according to the best information that could be obtained, was as follows: Magruder had about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his fo
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
aplain, Wm. H. Stewart; Acting-Master, Benj. Sebastian; Acting-Ensigns, L. Gardner and D. W. Sainter; Acting-Master's-Mates, W. H. Gray and A. E. McLean; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, G. W. Fulton; Acting-Second-Assistant, Jeremiah Wetzell. Receiving-ship Grampus. Acting-Master, Elizah Sells; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, M. W. Reber, Acting-Ensign, C. W. Lithurbury; Acting-Master's Mates, J. L. Williams, C. F. Clarkson and J. C. Wittsee. Inspection-ship Abraham. Paymaster, A. E. Watson; Acting-Ensign, Wm. Wagner; Acting-First-Assistant Engineer, Enos Hoshier. Hospital, Memphis, Tenn. Surgeons, Wi. Grier and H. F. McSherry; Acting-Assistant Surgeons, Henry Beauchamp, J. B. Parker and Abner Thorpe. Recruiting rendezvous, Chicago. Acting-Master, J. D. Harty; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. A. Daniels; Surgeon, Samuel J. Jones. Recruiting rendezvous, Cincinnati. Acting-Master, A. S. Bowen; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Geo. E. Jones; Assistant-Paymaster, Wm. H. Sells.
Galveston Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
rom the north, making a formidable army of from 25,000 to 30,000 men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and co-operation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my dispatch of February 2, but was thought, upon information received by the Government, to be exaggerated. The defences of the enemy consisted of a series of works covering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for the defence of the Red River, and extensive and formidable works at Trinity, the junction of the Tensas and Washita at Camden, commanding approaches from the north. To meet these forces of the enemy it was proposed to concentrate, in some general plan of operations, 15,000 of the troops under command of General Steele, a detachment of 10,000 from the command of General Sherman, a
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
uld be held at all consequences within the State of Texas. General Halleck further remarked that favoring such a scheme. He wanted a point in Texas to hold permanently. With the aid of gun-boatabine Pass, and all that was worth anything in Texas would have been at the disposal of Federal forfficulties that would beset an expedition into Texas by any other route, and, indeed, to have expreurg, New Orleans was in danger of capture from Texas, although a large portion of the country is in began to agitate his plan for the invasion of Texas, all the armies of the West had been placed unnt supplies from crossing the Mississippi from Texas, and occasionally threatening Mobile, until suhe ground--the remainder had just arrived from Texas and were at Berwick Bay without transportation Banks simply wanted to hold a strong point in Texas, he had the opportunity at Sabine Pass, which among them were 6,000 or 7,000 raw troops from Texas, commanded by General Green. These were badly[6 more...]
Berwick Bay (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
, as he only received the order to advance from the town of Franklin on the 12th of March. Banks informed General Franklin that he had promised to meet the Admiral in Alexandria on the 17th of March, and as the latter place is 175 miles from the town of Franklin, of course it was impossible to fulfill this promise. Besides, on the 10th of March only 3,000 of the troops which were to form that arm of the expedition were on the ground--the remainder had just arrived from Texas and were at Berwick Bay without transportation, and the cavalry had not arrived from New Orleans. Franklin started on the 13th, and his advance-guard reached Alexandria on the 25th, the rear-guard and pontoon train on the 26th and 27th. Thus Franklin marched at the rate of sixteen miles a day over bad roads, having to build many bridges across streams; while Banks, who had agreed to be at Alexandria on the 17th, only arrived on the 25th in a fast steamer — yet General Banks undertakes to say that Franklin re
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
ost expedition. Sherman was willing to listen to the Admiral, and the latter always gave that attention to Sherman's opinion which was due to his experience. It will strike any one at all conversant with military matters how absurdly the war at this time was conducted from Washington. Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of modern times, with a great prestige, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition of so little importance that he directed General Banks to send back A. J. Smith's command to Sherman after the 5th of May. General Grant was opposed to making any great effort to carry on the war west of the Mississippi, where it would take a large army and a large por
Alabama river (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
nks as follows: The Mississippi, though low for the season, is free of ice and in good boating order, but I understand Red River is still low. I had a man in from Alexandria yesterday, who reported the Falls or Rapids impassable except for the smallest boats. My inland expedition is now working, and I will be off for Jackson, etc., to-morrow. The only fear I have is in the weather; all the other combinations are good. I want to keep up the delusion of an attack on Mobile and the Alabama River, and therefore would be obliged to you if you would keep up a foraging or other expedition in that direction. My orders from General Grant will not as yet justify me in embarking for Red River, though I am very anxious to operate in that direction. The moment I learned you were preparing for it, I sent a communication to Admiral Porter and dispatches to General Grant, at Chattanooga, asking him if he wanted me and Steele to co-operate with you against Shreveport, and I will have his
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