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Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
y of this scheme and disapproved the attempt; but, even although he had taken Vicksburg, he did not feel strong enough to oppose so powerful a politician as General sessed the minds of Halleck and Banks that, after the fall of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, New Orleans was in danger of capture from Texas, although a large portion ofort. On March 5, 1864, Halleck wrote to Banks: When General Sherman left Vicksburg he expected to return there by the 1st of March, to cooperate with you west o think it most probable that before this reaches you he will have returned to Vicksburg, or some other point on the river. Whether he has received any recent ordersarticularly Halleck. General Sherman and the Admiral, after the capture of Vicksburg, had discussed this plan of taking Shreveport by a sudden movement; but they the Mississippi. While at Alexandria, Major-General McPherson, commanding at Vicksburg, called for the immediate return of the marine brigade — a part of General Sm
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
's Mate, Rivers Drake; Gunner, J. C. Ritter; Acting-Boatswain, William Allen; Acting-Gunners, A. P. Snyder and L. K. Ellis. Marine officers. Captain, M. R. Kintzing; Second-Lieutenants, F. L. Church and C. H. Humphrey. Naval station, Memphis, Tenn. Lieutenant Commander, Thomas Pattison; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Benton; Acting-Master, H. S. Wetmore; Acting-First-Assistant Engineer, Wm. Apperly. Receiving ship Clara Dolsen. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, John Scott; Acting-Ensign, C. W. Lithurbury; Acting-Master's Mates, J. L. Williams, C. F. Clarkson and J. C. Wittsee. Inspection-ship Abraham. Paymaster, A. E. Watson; Acting-Ensign, Wm. Wagner; Acting-First-Assistant Engineer, Enos Hoshier. Hospital, Memphis, Tenn. Surgeons, Wi. Grier and H. F. McSherry; Acting-Assistant Surgeons, Henry Beauchamp, J. B. Parker and Abner Thorpe. Recruiting rendezvous, Chicago. Acting-Master, J. D. Harty; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. A. Daniels; Surgeon, Samuel J. J
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
the best information that could be obtained, was as follows: Magruder had about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya anwas thought, upon information received by the Government, to be exaggerated. The defences of the enemy consisted of a series of works covering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, y of 40,000 to 42,000 men of all arms, with such gun-boats as the Navy Department should order. Orders were given to my command at once to suspend operations at Galveston, and vigorous preparations were made for the new campaign. Having been charged by the President with duties not immediately connected with military operations
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. Building of the famous Red River dam at the falls. difficulties overcome by Colonel Bailey. communications between General Banks and Admiraof officers and regiments engaged in building the dam. burning of Alexandria. the end of the Red River expedition. cause of failure. results. correspondence between Generals Sherman, Banks, Hallats, the Navy could have held this position against all the Confederate forces at that time on Red River. The Admiral got very tired of General Banks' letters. He at first tried to soothe him, buhad become considerably demoralized on account of the Confederates having gained a position on Red River, at Dunn's Bayou, thirty miles below Alexandria, and he believed the report that they were pret.--report of Rear-Admiral David D. Porter.Flag-Ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron Mouth of Red River, May 16, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to inform you that the vessels lately caught by low wa
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
Berwick's Bay, between Berwick City and Franklin, on the Bayou Teche, directly on the line of march for Alexandria and Shreveport. Small garrisons were left at Brownsville and Matagorda Bay, in Texas--positions which, under instructions from the President and subsequently from Lieutenant-General Grant, were not to be abandoned — at New Orleans and at Port Hudson, which was threatened by a vigorous and active enemy. Smaller garrisons at Baton Rouge and Donaldson ville on the river, and at Pensacola and Key West on the coast, constituted the balance of forces under my command, It had been arranged that the troops concentrated at Franklin should move for the Red River on the 7th of March, to meet the forces of General Sherman at Alexandria on the 17th. But, for causes stated by General Franklin, their march was delayed until the 13th, at which time the advance, under General A. L Lee, left Franklin, the whole column following soon after and arriving at Alexandria, the cavalry on th
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
nd Shreveport should be taken possession of and held as the most important objective point of the operations of a campaign of troops about to take a position where they could command Texas, and establish a better line of defence for Arkansas and Missouri than now occupied by General Steele, yet the Administration does not desire in any manner to control your actions as to the time and manner of performing this service, and you will take counsel with Generals Sherman and Steele and Admiral Porterabsurdly the war at this time was conducted from Washington. Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of modern times, with a great prestige, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition o
Twisty Bayou (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
d, were at an end. The disposition of the enemy's forces at that time, according to the best information that could be obtained, was as follows: Magruder had about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, making a formidable
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 44
avid D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. The Ozark, a large iron-clad, was the last vessel to pass the dam, aned that his only object was to carry out the orders of General Halleck, dated Washington, November 9, 1862, viz.: To ascend the Red River with a military and naval foh to oppose so powerful a politician as General Banks, or the plans formed in Washington by General Halleck, who called them the views of the Administration. General flank and rear with all my cavalry, and to make a feint with infantry on the Washington road. I yielded to Sherman and Blunt as far as this plan is concerned. B. wof General Halleck. When the news of the failure of the expedition reached Washington, Banks was written to by way of censure, and informed that his movements regant with military matters how absurdly the war at this time was conducted from Washington. Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of mode
Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
ed River, we compelled the immediate evacuation of that post by the enemy, and enabled the fleet of gun-boats under Admiral Porter to pass up to Alexandria without firing a gun. The Army reached Alexandria the 9th of May (1863), in the evening, the Navy having reached there the morning of the same day. The enemy continued his retreat in the direction of Shreveport. The facts of the case are as follows, unimportant as they may be: After landing General Grant's troops fifteen miles below Grand Gulf, taking possession of that place and removing all the guns, the Admiral left at noon, May 3, 1863, and arrived that evening at the mouth of the Red River, and communicated with Admiral Farragut. He had with him the gun-boats Benton, Lafayette, Pittsburg, Price, ram Switzerland, and tug Ivy. Admiral Farragut informed Porter that, hearing that General Banks proposed marching on Alexandria, he had sent the Ansonia and Estrella, under Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke, up Red River, to try
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
r asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition of so little importance that he directed General Banks to send back A. J. Smith's command to Sherman after the 5th of May. General Grant was opposed to making any great effort to carry on the war west of the Mississippi, where it would take a large army and a large portion of the Navy even to hold the central portion of Louisiana, which forces would soon be wanted on the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers. All that was required was for Banks to hold New Orleans against General J. E. Johnston, who might pounce upon it if left unprotected. Banks had not troops enough in his command to authorize the withdrawal of a large force from New Orleans. All he could expect to do was to hold several points on the west bank of the Mississippi, forage in West Louisiana, and prevent supplies from crossing the Mississippi from Texas, and occasionally threatening Mobile, until such ti
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