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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
t Louisiana, and prevent supplies from crossing the Mississippi from Texas, and occasionally threatening Mobile, until such time as Grant should direct him to march upon the latter city and capture it, which would have been when Sherman began his march to the sea. This would have left no enemies in Sherman's rear. He would have had the railroads open behind him, including the important one from Mobile to Montgomery, which, with a Union Army at Mobile, would have insured the pacification of Alabama and Mississippi, and would have prevented any attempt on the part of the Confederates to pursue Sherman's rear; and in case of necessity the Federals could have thrown a large part of Bank's Army by rail upon Montgomery and Atlanta, if Sherman had got into difficulty, and there would have been a line of communication open to Sherman from the time he started until he reached Savannah. General Banks made a report to Mr. Wade, President of the Senate, of his operations from the time he took
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
man was willing to listen to the Admiral, and the latter always gave that attention to Sherman's opinion which was due to his experience. It will strike any one at all conversant with military matters how absurdly the war at this time was conducted from Washington. Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of modern times, with a great prestige, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition of so little importance that he directed General Banks to send back A. J. Smith's command to Sherman after the 5th of May. General Grant was opposed to making any great effort to carry on the war west of the Mississippi, where it would take a large army and a large portion of the Navy even
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
l Grant will not as yet justify me in embarking for Red River, though I am very anxious to operate in that direction. The moment I learned you were preparing for it, I sent a communication to Admiral Porter and dispatches to General Grant, at Chattanooga, asking him if he wanted me and Steele to co-operate with you against Shreveport, and I will have his answer in time, for you cannot do anything until Red River has twelve feet of water on the rapids at Alexandria. That will be from March tild to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition of so little importance that he directed General Banks to send back A. J. Smith's command to Sherman after the 5th of May. General Grant was opposed to making any great effort to
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 44
n at all. After the fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, the Federals held both banks of the Mississippi, and gun-boats had access to its tributaries for at least a hundred miles into the heart of tand that the officers captured while shipping cotton to New Orleans from the west bank of the Mississippi were in the Confederate service, we are inclined to believe there would have been little diffthose under General Banks, so as to shorten the line of defence on the western side of the Mississippi River, and to establish a position within the State of Texas which should be permanently held, iom New Orleans. All he could expect to do was to hold several points on the west bank of the Mississippi, forage in West Louisiana, and prevent supplies from crossing the Mississippi from Texas, andor no orders, his command should not leave the fleet until they saw it safe through to the Mississippi River. Admiral Porter replied that he was not surprised to hear such news, as he had been antici
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, makices of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for the defence of the Red River, and extensive and formidable works at Trinity, the junction of the Tensas and Washita at Camden, commanding approaches from the north. To meet these forces of the enemy it was proposed to concentrate, in some general plan of operations, 15,000 of the troops under command of General Steele, a detachment of 10,000 from the command of Gener
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
nces, of renewing operations in this part of Louisiana, the season having passed for operating with necessary to proclaim to the inhabitants of Louisiana that the country was open to trade, and thatndria, which is exactly in the centre of western Louisiana, and lies on a large river, by which he rates saw that it was the subjugation of all Louisiana and the invasion of Texas that was contemplathat time. Any one who studies the map of Louisiana can estimate the value of General Halleck's e, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee,the Navy even to hold the central portion of Louisiana, which forces would soon be wanted on the Cuhe west bank of the Mississippi, forage in West Louisiana, and prevent supplies from crossing the Misuch a manner as to expel the enemy from northern Louisiana and Arkansas; 4th, such preparation and end of his military career. As Governor of Louisiana, Banks was not equal to Butler, who, with le[3 more...]
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
eized by the Navy was taken according to law, sent to the U. S. Marshal at Cairo, Illinois, and every form gone through with to avoid loss. Out of the many thousand bales sent to Cairo not a pound was lost or unaccounted for. In seizing cotton, the naval officers acted by direct authority of the Navy and Treasury Departmentsfficers to seize cotton which had been bought up by speculators, and send it to Cairo for them, which was invariably declined, although all the protection asked for of ales which had been seized by the Navy were returned to their owners in Cairo, Illinois, without any expense for transportation. These facts were proved in evide the Navy, and others, and many instances could be cited from the books kept at Cairo. Illinois, by Captain A. M. Pennock, Chief-of-Staff. If this expedition wasant, Eugene Callahan; Acting-Third-Assistant, T. H. Neely. Naval stations at Cairo and Mound City. Captain Alex. M. Pennock, Fleet-Captain and Commandant of St
Fort De Russy (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
four hours. Moving rapidly to the rear of Fort de Russy, a strong work on Red River, we compelled with the above-named vessels, arriving at Fort De Russy on the 5th. On the way up he met the two is wheel had been disabled by a shell from Fort De Russy; the other vessel was struck, but there wasels, and shortly after took possession of Fort De Russy. It was a strong work, with three casematit remembered, the Navy took possession of Fort De Russy--no very important event — on the morning officers and a gang of negroes working at Fort De Russy. The people all along the river were gladhafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and veston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles frAtchafalaya, and proceeded at once towards Fort De Russy, carrying it by assault at 4:30 P. M. on t necessary, and General Smith s capture of Fort De Russy, and Dick Taylor's forcing the fight at Sa
Opelousas (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
ya by means of the gun-boats Ansonia and Estrella. Banks says in his report: On the 5th of May our headquarters at Opelousas was broken up and the troops moved for Alexandria, a distance of from 90 to 100 miles, making this march in three days,rt De Russy--no very important event — on the morning of May 5, 1863, while General Banks only started on that day from Opelousas, distant, he says, from Alexandria, one hundred miles; yet he claims to have caused the evacuation of the post, enablinthout firing a gun. (!) How he could get in the rear of De Russy and cause its evacuation, when he had not started from Opelousas until late on the day it was captured by the Navy, is a mystery, and military men should make a note of it for future rnsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; w
Madisonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
once to suspend operations at Galveston, and vigorous preparations were made for the new campaign. Having been charged by the President with duties not immediately connected with military operations, but which were deemed important and required my personal attention at New Orleans, the organization of the troops of my command assigned to the expedition was intrusted to Major-General W. B. Franklin. The main body of his command, consisting of the 19th corps--except Grover's division at Madisonville, which was to join him — and one division of the 13th corps, under General Ransom, were at this time on Berwick's Bay, between Berwick City and Franklin, on the Bayou Teche, directly on the line of march for Alexandria and Shreveport. Small garrisons were left at Brownsville and Matagorda Bay, in Texas--positions which, under instructions from the President and subsequently from Lieutenant-General Grant, were not to be abandoned — at New Orleans and at Port Hudson, which was threatened b
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