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Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
his name frequently appears in the dispatches of the commander-in-chief as always doing well in whatever situation he was placed. The operations of the Navy were conducted all along the coast of South Carolina and in Florida, after the active and exciting raids in the harbor of Charleston. Several vessels were taken by the enemy: the Columbine, a captured river-boat, was retaken by the Confederates up the St. John's River, and the U. S. S. Water Witch captured by a number of boats in Ossabaw Sound after a gallant defence; but these were small mishaps, and to be expected in a large base of operations. The last mentioned might have been avoided by shifting the berth after dark, and keeping the watch at quarters in a place where a boarding expedition of the enemy was to have been expected. They were quite as fertile in expedients to destroy and capture as were tle Federal forces. Most of the officers of the Water Witch were wounded during the first of the attack, and Lieutenant-Co
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
Rear-Admiral DuPont delivered to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren the command of the forces occupying the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and part of Florida. This force, which consisted of 70 vessels of all classes, was scattered along the coast for a disss they determined to remain and stand the consequences : Headquarters First Military District, Department of S. C., Ga., And Florida. June, 13, 1864. General — I have the honor to inclose for transmission to the Commanding General of the Uthe other forces in the field, and was informed that there was a very alarming state of affairs in that Department; that Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi were the only States where there was an accumulation, and that the Confederate Army was at that time being subsisted from these States. The Commissary of Georgia sent dispatches that he could not send another pound of provisions to Richmond. Alabama, under the most urgent call, could only send forward 135,000 pounds of food. Mississippi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 50
time we now know full well, and probably some civilian member of the Confederate Cabinet suggested this confinement of Federal prisoners in Charleston; for it cannot be conceived that any of the high-toned officers, who on many occasions showed true chivalric feeling in the capture of Federals, should have instituted a scheme that would surely have reflected on them as honorable soldiers. On the 20th of June the Rear-Admiral commanding received a notification from the Navy Department in Washington that the Confederates in Charleston were preparing for a simultaneous move on the blockade, inside and out, in order to cover the exit of a large quantity of cotton. The next day, the Sonoma, Commander George H. Cooper, and Nipsic, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson, were sent as outside cruisers to cover the blockade south of Port Royal, where it was weakest, and where the chief effort was to be made. A plan was laid between General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to make a diversion by
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
quest in writing to Flagofficer W. W. Hunter, that the Confederate Secretary of the Navy be applied to for his release, according to the supposed agreement; but he only, after a second application, received for answer the following letter: Savannah, July 17, 1864 I have received your note of this day. In reply, I have to inform you that I am instructed by the honorable Secretary of the Navy as follows, viz.: When the services of Assistant-Surgeon Pierson, United States Navy, are no longruisers to cover the blockade south of Port Royal, where it was weakest, and where the chief effort was to be made. A plan was laid between General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to make a diversion by cutting the railroad between Charleston and Savannah. Generals Foster, Schimmelfennig and Hatch were to land, each with a force considered adequate for the occasion, while General Birney was to go into the North Edisto, and as high as possible, to destroy the railroad. The Navy was to enter the
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
d with their heavy guns and bursting shells, and the Southerners were usually discomfited. General Gordon landed at Jacksonville on the 9th of May, and assumed command of the district of Florida; and, in view of the long line of river to be kept oal force employed in the St. John's River, under Commander Balch, was composed of the Pawnee, Mahaska and Norwich, off Jacksonville, and the Ottawa at Palatka. With such a small force it would have been impossible to prevent the enemy from practicin transport Maple-leaf offered another success for the Confederates, and was blown up by a torpedo, fifteen miles above Jacksonville — this being the highway to Palatka and above, where Federal troops were being constantly transported. The duty on th by the Army, as will appear by the following letter: Headquarters of Auxiliary Column To Gordon's Command, Jacksonville, Florida, June 3, 1864. Captain — It is a duty and pleasure to express through you to the officers and privates of your
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
icket duty by night along the sea-shore of Morris Island, and in the little stream on its inner borPatapsco, Ottawa. July 31. Batteries on Morris Island Ottawa. Aug. 1. Wagner Montauk, Patapscd vicinity Patapsco, Catskill. Aug. 13. Morris Island Dai Ching, Ottawa, Mahaska, Racer, Wissahi Aug. 19. Wagner Ironsides. Aug. 20. Morris Island Ironsides, Mahaska, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Lodrk. The operations of the iron-clads at Morris Island were appropriately closed by a severe contan's Island, to co-operate, as was done at Morris Island. No doubt the struggle would have been a ly, 1863, the Passaic went into action with Fort Wagner, followed by the Patapsco and the New Ironstes, who, after they had lost the forts on Morris Island and seen Sumter battered out of shape by tof approach than ever. Colonel Davis held Morris Island up to Cummings' Point and commanded Sumterhimmelfennig, Commanding United States Forces, Morris and Folly Islands, etc. There is much to b[11 more...]
San Juan River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
a force into Florida, on the west bank of the St. John's River, and desired his assistance. In consequence, three gun-boats were sent to the St. John's River by the commander-in-chief, who, the same evening, departed hleaving a sufficient force of gun-boats in the St. John's River to co-operate with the Army if necessary. Th, were participating in the expedition up the St. John's River. When the Federal troops landed, they threw uted to any reduction of the naval force in the St. John's River, in which Commander Balch concurred with him. y as much as possible to the lower part of the St. John's River. Notwithstanding the vigilance of the navally wounded. The naval force employed in the St. John's River, under Commander Balch, was composed of the Patain Geo. B. Balch, Commanding Naval Squadron, St. John's River. In these small affairs whatever was attemr-boat, was retaken by the Confederates up the St. John's River, and the U. S. S. Water Witch captured by a nu
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
rate Army was at that time being subsisted from these States. The Commissary of Georgia sent dispatches that he could not send another pound of provisions to Richmond. Alabama, under the most urgent call, could only send forward 135,000 pounds of food. Mississippi was doing all she could in supplying rations to General Beauregard's army. South Carolina could only subsist the troops at Charleston and the prisoners in the interior of the State. The enemy had visited every section of North Carolina, and that State was only able to supply the forts at Wilmington with rations of the most ordinary kind, and not a pound of meat could be shipped to either Wilmington or Richmond. Fortunately for the Confederates, the blockade-runner Banshee succeeded in eluding the blockaders and getting into Wilmington; and owing to this timely supply of provisions the reserves at the forts were prevented from being starved out. As it was, the commissaries were only able to supply them with thirty da
Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
head. Aug. 2. Wagner Ottawa. Marblehead. Aug. 4. Wagner Montauk, Marblehead. Aug. 6. Wagner Marblehead. Aug. 8. Wagner Ottawa, Mahaska, Marblehead. Aug. 11. Wagner and vicinity Patapsco, Catskill. Aug. 13. Morris Island Dai Ching, Ottawa, Mahaska, Racer, Wissahickon. Aug. 14. Morris Island Wissahickon, Mahaska, Dan Smith, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Racer. Aug. 15. Wagner Racer, Dan Smith. Aug. 17. Batteries on Morris Island to direct fire from the batteries which opened on Sumter. Weehawken, Ironsides, Montauk, Nahant, Catskill, Passaic, Patapsco, Canandaigua Mahaska, Ottawa, Cimmaron, Wissahickon, Dai Ching, Lodona. Aug. 18. Wagner, to prevent assault Ironsides, Passaic, Weehawken, Wissahickon, Mahaska, Dai Ching, Ottawa, Lodona. Aug. 19. Wagner Ironsides. Aug. 20. Morris Island Ironsides, Mahaska, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Lodona. Aug. 21. Sumter and Wagner Ironsides, Patapsco, Mahaska, Dai Ching. Aug. 22. Wagner Weehawken, Ironsides, Montauk. Aug. 23. S
New Market (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
allant affairs on the Federal side as well as on that of the Confederates; for though the latter resorted to every means in their power to damage the Federal vessels, yet the officers of the Navy were ever on the alert to take advantage of anything that would enable them to circumvent the enemy. These were small affairs, but they were hazardous, and showed the skill of the Union officers and men. On the 23d of March, a steamer, supposed to be loading with cotton, was discovered up the Santee River, at a point called McClellansville, and Commodore Rowan, senior officer of the blockading squadron, ordered Lieutenant A. W. Weaver, of the gun-boat Winona, to fit out an expedition and cut her out. Accordingly, an expedition was started from the Winona, under the command of Acting-Master E. H. Sheffield (executive officer), consisting of the gig and second and third cutters. Acting-Ensign Lieutenant-Commander (now Captain) A. W. Weaver. Wm. McKendry was in charge of one cutter, Ac
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